Another high official demoted due to Bo Xilai


Hong Kong’s Singtao Daily says today, Luo Lin, director of State Administration of Work Safety was suddenly removed. Senior mediaman Chen Jieren says in his microblog that internal high-level sources reveal Luo will perhaps be transferred to the post of deputy director of China Co-op. Luo was demoted because of his misconduct in handling the landslide at Wulong Mountain, Chonqing in 2009 in which 10 people died and 64 were missing. The landslide was caused by illegal logging on the slope where logging was banned, but in order to please Bo Xilai, the then Chongqing Party boss, Luo who was in charge of the investigation, determined that the disaster was caused by nature instead illegal logging and understated the death toll.


China Begins New Round of Stimulus, With Caution


New York Times says, due to falling growth rate, China’s leaders have begun to take measures to boost economy though they have made no formal announcement of a stimulus program. On Wednesday People’s Daily, the Communist Party’s leading newspaper, quoted leading Chinese economists as suggesting that any efforts to bolster growth are likely to be measured.

For details please visit New York Times website at:

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/05/31/world/asia/in-china-a-new-round-of-stimulus.html?_r=1&nl=todaysheadlines&emc=edit_th_20120531


Ambassador stunned at Wang Lijun’s request for asylum


Hong Kong’s Singtao Daily says in its report, in an interview with Newsweek, US Ambassador to China Gary Locke said his first reaction to the news of Wang Lijun seeking asylum was “OH, MY GOD!”

Gary Lock said that when he was at a meeting in Beijing away from the embassy, he received a cryptic email in his mobile phone telling him to “Return to the embassy’s secure communications area immediately.” He rushed back and found a Sino-US diplomatic storm was brewing as Chongqing police chief Wang Lijun was in US consulate in Chengdu seeking asylum.

Wang told Americans that Bo Xilai intended to kill him as he knew too much of the secret about the poisoning and murder of Neil Heywood, a British citizen, so that he wanted to go to America for safety.

Bo Xilai sent armed personnel to surround the consulate, but Wang would not surrender to Bo and finally left for Beijing accompanied by people he trusted.

Locke said “it felt like something out of a spy thriller.”


Ma’s One country, two areas OK with Beijing


Xinhua says that Yang Yi, a spokesman from the State Council Taiwan Affairs Office, said the mainland was not surprised to hear Taiwan leader Ma Ying-jeou’s recent use of the phrase “one country, two areas” to describe cross-Strait relations. It is consistent with Ma’s previous policies.

Yang said: Beijing considers any statements, ideas or policies that adhere to the fact that both sides of the Taiwan Strait are parts of one China to be positive and conducive to the peaceful development of cross-Strait relations.

For details please visit Xinhua website at

http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/china/2012-05/30/c_131620393.htm#


Fujian and Guizhou rallies for vindication of June 4


According to SCMP, In Fujian more than a dozen protesters rallied outside a court demanding a reassessment of the June 4 incident while in downtown Guiyang, Guizhou province, dozens of protesters sought official vindication of the 1989 Tiananmen Protests.


Hand over money, villagers told, SCMP


Villagers near a major dam construction sites in Sichuan and Yunnan are forced to pay to authorities 30,720 yuan (US$5,680) per head from the compensation they receive for the loss of their homes and farmland and dip into their own pockets if the levy exceeds the compensation they have got.

The compensation is only a subsidy of 160 yuan (US$30) per month for years barely enough for food, still officials want to reduce it.

For details please visit SCMP at:

http://www.scmp.com/portal/site/SCMP/menuitem.2af62ecb329d3d7733492d9253a0a0a0/?vgnextoid=68920ca3c6e97310VgnVCM100000360a0a0aRCRD&ss=China&s=News


Major Chinese bank’s vice-president detained


According to China’s caixin.com and Hong Kong’s SCMP, Yang Kun, executive vice-president of Agricultural Bank of China was brought away by the discipline inspection authority to “assist investigation”.

According to SCMP, that has been confirmed by the Bank’s filing yesterday to Hong Kong’s stock exchange.

Sources say one of his relative has also been brought away to receive investigation.

Yang’s case began with his involvement in a Beijing property entrepreneur’s gambling but sources say he is suspected to have lots of other problems.

Quite a few of those familiar with Yang are surprised at the news as Yang was a rising star with the prospects of rising to a top executive post in a major state-owned bank.


Is Tiananmen butcher Chen Xitong remorseful?


“Drop butcher’s knife, become a Buddha at once.” This is a Chinese saying much used in the past and indeed made some bad people turn a new leaf. However it has seldom been used since the communists came to power perhaps because a despot, if a communist, must be an atheist not so easily persuaded as the despots before the communist takeover. However, I agree that even if a despot is a communist, when he is really willing to drop butcher’s knife and turn a new leaf, he can also become a Buddha at once.

Does this saying apply to Chen Xitong, a major Tiananmen butcher whose hands are stained with lots of students’ blood. We shall first ask whether he has dropped butcher’s knife.

He does not prepare his memoirs to show his remorse of the killing or the terror he created in Beijing after the Massacre. He does not reveal the details of how he ordered soldiers to kill and how many they killed and wounded though he had the best access to such information at that time. He did not reveal how he rounded up participants of the democracy movement and tortured them to get information of other participants’ whereabouts.

In fact, Yao Jianfu, the writer of the memoirs based on his interviews with Chen Xitong, told BBC reporter that he met Chen on May 29 and heard Chen say that Chen regarded himself a firm communist and Chen had not changed his basic attitude against June 4 even today.

Certainly, Chen has not dropped butcher’s knife. Chen said killing could be avoided as if he regrets the killing he has done, but as a “firm communist”, he would arrest students and torture them though not kill them.

Why then did he give the interviews and want the memoirs published?

According to Yao, he wants to “restore the truth and set the records straight”.

What records? His role in the Tiananmen crackdown and his corruption crime.

So far Chen has been regarded as a major Tiananmen butcher ranking next only to Li Peng. He certainly does not want to leave such a record in Chinese history and bring shame to his offspring. However, he cannot deny his involvement in the Massacre. He only wants to be regarded as a “small potato” doing what he was ordered to in directing the killing, giving reports on the incident and reading the report to NPC Standing Committee to justify the killing.

If his self-defense were accepted, the name of him, “a small potato”, would perhaps not appear in the history record about that major incident in Chinese history or even if appeared, would not draw much attention. Chen forgets that Li Peng’s description of him being the chief commander of the Massacre was based on the actual role he played in the Massacre instead of some official appointment. Moreover, he cannot deny the facts that he obviously enjoyed the limelight given to him, the honor granted him in reading the report and the promotion he got for his contribution to the Massacre (he was promoted into the powerful Politburo for his role in the Massacre) at that time.

At the time during and after the Massacre, exaggeration of his role in the Massacre would make him very happy, but now things have changed. He knows sooner or later, there will be reassessment of the June 4 incident to regard it as Chinese people’ unprecedented struggle for democracy and denounce Tiananmen butchers.

He publishes the memoirs first of all to shake off his notorious reputation as a major Tiananmen butcher.

However, his arguments are very weak. As mentioned above, he cannot deny he actually played the role as the chief commander of the Massacre.

As for his argument that he has not deceived late paramount leader Deng Xioping into making a wrong decision to send the People’s Liberation Army into the square, Chen was so happy when Yao quoted Zhao Ziyang’s words that “Deng wouldn’t be Deng if he could be easily tricked.” Note, Chen does not deny that he did provide information to deceive Deng, but is only happy that as Deng could not be deceived, his information failed to play a decisive role in causing Deng to make the decision.

Chen’s memoirs conspicuously reflect Tiananmen butchers’ fear of the future. Every year when the anniversary of June 4 approaches, they will be filled with consternation that Tiananmen Protests may be redressed on the anniversary. Even Chinese leaders are filled with worry. They will perhaps be embarrassed again by questions about or demand for redressing the event.

Better a finger off than aye wagging. Redress the event immediately to remove the embarrassment forever. Jiang Zemin cannot do that nor can Hu Jintao. Redressing the event will affect Deng Xiaoping’s reputation. Deng was both Jiang’s and Hu’s mentor. He picked them from obscurity and promoted them to the top. It has been a long-established practice in Chinese politics that one never hurts one’s mentor.

Jiang was clever to find a way out. Chosen as the successor after the Massacre, he certainly incurred the strong hatred arisen from the Massacre as he was benefited by the Massacre though his hands have not been stained by the blood. To give vent to their indignation, people wanted at least one Tiananmen butcher punished for whatever reason. If it was impossible to punish the butcher for the Massacre, find whatever offense in him to punish him.

Beijing deputy mayor Wang Baosen’s suicide gave Jiang the opportunity to punish Chen Xitong. Was the evidence sufficient enough? Perhaps not, but Jiang did not care, nor did people who had been incensed by the Massacre. Anyway, Jiang became more acceptable by punishing Chen.

Publisher Bao Pu and writer Yao Jianfu are perhaps not aware how happy people were when they learnt that Chen, a major Tiananmen butcher, was in trouble as perhaps neither Bao nor Yao lived among those who felt happy when Chen was punished. To be honest, perhaps Chen shall not have been imprisoned for such a long term for his corruption crime, but he deserves the death penalty for his capital crime in the Massacre. He shall regard himself as lucky for being merely imprisoned.


Chen Guangcheng fights back


New York Times carries Chen’s article that describe the dire violation of Chinese laws by those whose duties are to implement the rule of law.

To read the article please visit New York Times website at:

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/05/30/opinion/how-china-flouts-its-laws.html?_r=1&nl=todaysheadlines&emc=edit_th_20120530


Drop butcher’s knife, become a Buddha at once


The heading is a Chinese saying much used in the past and indeed made some bad people turn a new leaf. However it has seldom been used since the Communist came to power perhaps because a despot, if a communist, must be an atheist not so easily persuaded as the despots before him. However, I agree that even if a despot is a communist, when he is really willing to drop butcher’s knife and turn a new leaf, he can also become a Buddha at once.

Does this saying apply to Chen Xitong, a major Tiananmen butcher whose hands are stained with lots of students’ blood. We shall first ask whether he has dropped butcher’s knife.

He does not prepare his memoirs to show his remorse of the killing or the terror he created in Beijing after the Massacre. He does not reveal the details of how he ordered soldiers to kill and how many they killed and wounded though he had the best access to such information at that time. He did not reveal how he rounded up participants of the democracy movement and tortured them to get information of other participants’ whereabouts.

In fact, Yao Jianfu, the writer of the memoirs based on his interviews with Chen Xitong, told BBC reporter that he met Chen on May 29 and heard Chen say that Chen regarded himself a firm communist and he had not changed his basic attitude against June 4 even today.

Certainly, he has not dropped butcher’s knife. Chen said killing could be avoided, but as a “firm communist”, he would arrest students and torture them though not kill them.

Why then did he give the interviews and wanted the memoirs published?

According to Yao, Yao and he want to “restore the truth and set the records straight”.

What records? His role in the Tiananmen crackdown and his corruption crime.

So far Chen has been regarded as a major Tiananmen butcher ranking next only to Li Peng. He certainly does not want to leave such a record in Chinese history and bring shame to his offspring. However, he cannot deny his involvement in the Massacre. He only wants to be regarded as a “small potato” doing what he was ordered to in directing the killing, giving reports on the incident and reading the report to NPC Standing Committee to justify the killing.

If his self-defense were accepted, the name of him, a small potato, would perhaps not appear in the history record about that major incident in Chinese history or even if appeared, would not draw much attention. Chen forgets that Li Peng’s description of him being the chief commander of the Massacre was based on the actual role he played in the Massacre instead of some official appointment of the post. Moreover, he cannot deny the facts that he obviously enjoyed the limelight given to him at that time, the honor granted him in reading the report and the promotion he got for his contribution to the Massacre (he was promoted into the powerful Politburo for his role in the Massacre).

At the time during and after the Massacre, exaggeration of his role in the Massacre would make him very happy, but now things have changed. He knows sooner or later, there will be reassessment of the June 4 incident to regard it as Chinese people’ unprecedented struggle for democracy and denounce Tiananmen butchers.

He publishes the memoirs first of all to shake off his notorious reputation as a major Tiananmen butcher.

However, his arguments are very weak. I have pointed out that he cannot deny he actually played the role as the chief commander of the Massacre.

As for his argument that he has not deceived late paramount leader Deng Xioping into making a wrong decision to send the People’s Liberation Army into the square, Chen was so happy when Yao quoted Zhao Ziyang’s words that “Deng wouldn’t be Deng if he could be easily tricked.” Note, Chen does not deny that he did provide information to deceive Deng, but is only happy that as Deng cannot be deceived, his information failed to play a decisive role in causing Deng to make the decision.

Chen’s memoirs conspicuously reflect Tiananmen butchers’ fear of the future. Every year when the anniversary of June 4 approaches, they will be filled with consternation that Tiananmen Protests may be redressed on the anniversary. Even Chinese leaders are filled with worry. They will perhaps be embarrassed again by questions about or even the mere mentioning of the event.

Better a finger off than aye wagging. Redress the event immediately to remove the embarrassment forever. Jiang Zemin cannot do that nor can Hu Jintao. Redressing the event will affect Deng Xiaoping’s reputation. Deng was both Jiang’s and Hu’s mentor. He picked them from obscurity and promoted them to the top. It has been a long-established practice in Chinese politics that one never hurts one’s mentor.

Jiang was clever to find a way out. Chosen as the successor after the Massacre, he certainly incurred the strong hatred arisen from the Massacre as he was benefited by the Massacre though his hands have not been stained by the blood. To give vent to their indignation, people wanted one Tiananmen butcher punished for whatever reason. He could not be punished for the Massacre, but find whatever offense in him to punish him.

Beijing deputy mayor Wang Baosen’s suicide gave Jiang the opportunity to punish Chen Xitong. Was the evidence sufficient enough? Perhaps not, but Jiang did not care, nor did people who had been incensed by the Massacre. Anyway, Jiang became more acceptable by punishing Chen.

Publisher Bao Pu and writer Yao Jianfu are perhaps not aware how happy people were when they learnt that Chen, a major Tiananmen butcher, was in trouble as they did not live among those who felt happy when Chen was punished. To be honest, perhaps Chen shall not have been imprisoned for such a long term for his corruption crime, but he deserves the death penalty for his capital crime in the Massacre. He shall regard himself as lucky for being merely imprisoned.