China could build nuclear plants for South China Sea, paper says


The northwest side of Mischief Reef showing a 1,900 foot seawall and newly-constructed infrastructure including housing, an artificial turf parade grounds, cement plants, and docking facilities are shown in this Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) Asia Maritime Transparency Initiative January 8, 2016 satellite image released to Reuters on January 15, 2016. REUTERS/CSIS Asia Maritime Transparency Initiative/Digital Globe/Handout via Reuters

The northwest side of Mischief Reef showing a 1,900 foot seawall and newly-constructed infrastructure including housing, an artificial turf parade grounds, cement plants, and docking facilities are shown in this Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) Asia Maritime Transparency Initiative January 8, 2016 satellite image released to Reuters on January 15, 2016. REUTERS/CSIS Asia Maritime Transparency Initiative/Digital Globe/Handout via Reuters

China is getting closer to building maritime nuclear power platforms that could one day be used to support projects in the disputed South China Sea, a state-run newspaper said on Friday, but the foreign ministry said it had not heard of the plans.

China has rattled nerves with its military and construction activities on the islands it occupies in the South China Sea, including building runways, though Beijing says most of the construction is meant for civilian purposes, like lighthouses.

The Global Times, an influential tabloid published by the ruling Communist Party’s official People’s Daily, said the nuclear power platforms could “sail” to remote areas and provide a stable power supply.

China Shipbuilding Industry Corp, the company in charge of designing and building the platforms, is “pushing forward the work”, said Liu Zhengguo, the head of its general office.

“The development of nuclear power platforms is a burgeoning trend,” Liu told the paper. “The exact number of plants to be built by the company depends on the market demand.”

Demand is “pretty strong”, he added, without elaborating.

Chinese Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying played down the story as a media report, however.

“I’ve not heard here of the relevant situation,” Hua told a daily news briefing, without elaborating.

In January, two Chinese state-owned energy companies, China National Offshore Oil Corporation (CNOOC) and China General Nuclear Power Corporation (CGN), signed a strategic cooperation framework pact on offshore oil and nuclear power.

CGN has been developing a small modular nuclear reactor for maritime use, called the ACPR50S, to provide power for offshore oil and gas exploration and production. It expects to begin building a demonstration project in 2017.

Xu Dazhe, head of China’s atomic safety commission, told reporters in January the floating platforms were in the planning stage and must undergo “strict and scientific demonstrations”.

Chinese naval expert Li Jie told the Global Times the platforms could power lighthouses, defense facilities, airports and harbors in the South China Sea. “Normally we have to burn oil or coal for power,” Li said.

It was important to develop a maritime nuclear power platform as changing weather and ocean conditions presented a challenge in transporting fuel to the distant Spratlys, he added.

China claims almost the entire South China Sea, believed to have huge deposits of oil and gas, and is building islands on reefs to bolster its claims. Brunei, Malaysia, the Philippines, Taiwan and Vietnam also have claims to parts of the waters, through which about $5 trillion in trade is shipped every year.

(Additional reporting by David Stanway; Editing by Clarence Fernandez)

Source: Reuters “China could build nuclear plants for South China Sea, paper says”

Note: This is Reuters article that reflects its writer’s and editor’s views. I post it for readers’ information, which  does not mean that I agree with their views.

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3 Comments on “China could build nuclear plants for South China Sea, paper says”

  1. Fermina Uher says:

    What are you stating, man? I recognize everyones got their own opinion, but really? Listen, your website is cool. I like the hard work you put into it, specifically with the vids and the pics. But, come on. Theres gotta be a better way to say this, a way that doesnt make it seem like most people here is stupid!

    Like

    • chankaiyee2 says:

      I have added a disclaimer to make clear that it is Reuters’ report that I reposted for readers’ information, It does not mean that I agree with the report’s views.

      However, in general, if people are stupid whether they are a minority or a vast majority of all the people, I would rather point out that fact instead of cheating them by the lie that they are instead clever.

      I have been writing my blog for some years on people’s wisdom and stupidity. By pointing out their stupidity especially powerful politicians’ stupidity, I may have offended quite a few people, but I don’t care. Telling the truth may help people to become wiser. It is much better than profiting by telling them lies.

      You may think that what most people do is always correct. I hope so but have witnessed the misery caused by majority of people when a shrewd leader exploited their stupidity to turn them into Red Guards and Rebels and caused chaos in China for a decade. There have been quite a few such events in Chinese history.

      You yourself may be stupid and unhappy when others point out the fact, but it helps you to become wiser; therefore, do not be unhappy when other people express their views that displease you. At least, I believe that you do not oppose freedom of speech.

      Like

  2. Joseph says:

    It is very strategic to build nuclear plants on the artificial island. Apart from cheaper reliable energy, abundant energy would enable development on the otherwise remote area to a new level. It will also dispel any American nonsense that the SCS dispute is all about its oil. On strategic sense, it will raise strategic value, since nuclear assets are always to be defended at all cost, thus a full-fledged military base is feasible. The American may not want the SCS militarized, but it is really not up to them. Even if the American chooses its traditional scorch earth policy to raze them, its ally Phillipines will be the first into radiation zones.

    Like


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