Chinese jets intercept U.S. military plane over South China Sea: Pentagon


An octagonal tower with a conical feature at its top, located on the northeast side of Subi Reef was nearly complete measuring 40 feet on each side and 90 to 100 feet tall in this Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) Asia Maritime Transparency Initiative January 8, 2016 satellite file image released to Reuters on January 15, 2016. REUTERS/CSIS Asia Maritime Transparency Initiative/Digital Globe/Handout via Reuters/Files

An octagonal tower with a conical feature at its top, located on the northeast side of Subi Reef was nearly complete measuring 40 feet on each side and 90 to 100 feet tall in this Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) Asia Maritime Transparency Initiative January 8, 2016 satellite file image released to Reuters on January 15, 2016. REUTERS/CSIS Asia Maritime Transparency Initiative/Digital Globe/Handout via Reuters/Files

Two Chinese fighter jets carried out an “unsafe” intercept of a U.S. military reconnaissance aircraft over the South China Sea, the Pentagon said on Wednesday, drawing a rebuke from Beijing, which demanded that Washington end surveillance near China.

The incident, likely to increase tension in and around the contested waterway, took place in international airspace on Tuesday as the U.S. maritime patrol aircraft carried out “a routine U.S. patrol,” a Pentagon statement said.

The encounter comes a week after China scrambled fighter jets as a U.S. Navy ship sailed close to a disputed reef in the South China Sea.

Another Chinese intercept took place in 2014 when a Chinese fighter pilot flew acrobatic maneuvers around a U.S. spy plane.

The intercept occurred days before President Barack Obama travels to parts of Asia from May 21-28, including a Group of Seven summit in Japan and his first trip to Vietnam.

China claims most of the South China Sea, through which $5 trillion in ship-borne trade passes every year. The Philippines, Vietnam, Malaysia, Taiwan and Brunei have overlapping claims.

Washington has accused Beijing of militarizing the South China Sea after creating artificial islands, while Beijing, in turn, has criticized increased U.S. naval patrols and exercises in Asia.

The Pentagon statement said the Department of Defense was addressing the issue through military and diplomatic channels.

“ENDANGERING SECURITY”

China’s Foreign Ministry spokesman Hong Lei said the U.S. statement was “not true” and that the aircraft had been engaging in reconnaissance close to China’s island province of Hainan.

“It must be pointed out that U.S. military planes frequently carry out reconnaissance in Chinese coastal waters, seriously endangering Chinese maritime security,” Hong told reporters at a regular press briefing on Thursday.

“We demand that the United States immediately cease this type of close reconnaissance activity to avoid having this sort of incident happening again,” Hong said, adding that the actions of the Chinese aircraft were “completely in keeping with safety and professional standards”.

“They maintained safe behavior and did not engage in any dangerous action,” Hong said.

China’s Defense Ministry said in a fax that it was looking into reports on the incident.

The Pentagon has yet to release the precise location of the encounter.

SIGNAL OF DISPLEASURE?

In 2015, the United States and China announced agreements on a military hotline and rules of behavior to govern air-to-air encounters called the Code for Unplanned Encounters at Sea (CUES).

“This is exactly the type of irresponsible and dangerous intercepts that the air-to-air annex to CUES is supposed to prevent,” said Greg Poling, director of the Asia Maritime Transparency Initiative at Washington’s Center for Strategic and International Studies think-tank.

Poling said either some part of China’s airforce “hadn’t gotten the message”, or it was meant as a signal of displeasure with recent U.S. freedom of navigation actions in the South China Sea.

“If the latter, it would be very disappointing to find China sacrificing the CUES annex for political gamesmanship.”

Zhang Baohui, a security expert at Hong Kong’s Lingnan University, said he believed the encounter highlighted the limitation of CUES, and shows that Chinese pilots would still fly close to U.S. surveillance planes if needed.

“Frankly, we’re always going to see these kinds of incidents as China will always put the priority on national security over something like CUES whenever it feels its interests are directly threatened,” he said.

While the precise location of the encounter is not yet known, regional military attaches and experts say the southern Chinese coast is a military area of increasing sensitivity for Beijing.

Its submarine bases on Hainan are home to an expanding fleet of nuclear-armed submarines and a big target for on-going Western surveillance operations.

The Guangdong coast is also believed to be home to some of China’s most advanced missiles, including the DF-21D anti-ship weapon.

The Pentagon last month called on China to reaffirm it has no plans to deploy military aircraft in the Spratly Islands after China used a military plane to evacuate sick workers from Fiery Cross Reef, where it has built a 3,000 meter (9,800 ft) runway.

In April 2001, an intercept of a U.S. spy plane by a Chinese fighter jet resulted in a collision that killed the Chinese pilot and forced the American plane to make an emergency landing at a base on Hainan.

The 24 U.S. air crew members were held for 11 days until Washington apologized for the incident. That encounter soured U.S.-Chinese relations in the early days of President George W. Bush’s first administration.

Last month, the Pentagon said that Russia had intercepted a U.S. Air Force aircraft over the Baltic Sea in an “unsafe and unprofessional” way.

(Additional reporting by David Brunnstrom in Washington, Greg Torode in Hong Kong, and Michael Martina in Beijing; Editing by Sandra Maler, Lincoln Feast and Mike Collett-White)

Source: Reuters “Chinese jets intercept U.S. military plane over South China Sea: Pentagon”

This blogger’s comments:

What if the US warplane is shot down when it enters China’s territorial airspace? Before Nixon’s China visit, China shot down US reconnaissance airplanes within its airspace and imprisoned the pilots it had arrested, who were not released until the visit. At that time, US military was much stronger than Chinese one, still it does not dare to do anything to rescue its pilots.

Now, China has built airports at the South China Sea to enable it to arrest US pilots or crews if any dangerous encounter causes them to leave their warplane. What will the US do? Start a war or apologize like what it did in the Hainan incident to have China release its crew?

Moreover, I wonder whether China and Russia coordinated in humiliating the US by intercepting US reconnaissance aircrafts almost at the same time.

Hard for the US to maintain its position as world hegemon if Russia and China are united!

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4 Comments on “Chinese jets intercept U.S. military plane over South China Sea: Pentagon”

  1. Simon says:

    There won’t be any need for “rule of engagement” if the American stop poking its nose tresspassing into Chinese airspace and water. Sending a spy plane near the coast of another country is an unfriendly act and must be challenged. If China does the same thing to the yanks it will be met with anti aircraft missiles.

    Like

  2. Fu Man-Chu says:

    AMERIKAN TWISTED TONGUES

    “This is exactly the type of irresponsible and dangerous intercepts that the air-to-air annex to CUES is supposed to prevent,” said Greg Poling, director of the Asia Maritime Transparency Initiative at Washington’s Center for Strategic and International Studies think-tank.”

    “Irresponsible and “dangerous intercepts”? What BS. Greg Poling is just a paid mouthpiece of Imperial Washington. He is, in simple language, a liar. A trait which seems very common nowadays in Amerika. Get the facts, Poling. 50 meters is not “irresponsible and dangerous”. Even the Pentagon now admits that.

    Bl**dy Amerikans. All they are very good at nowadays is smear. The next time another spy plane comes near Chinese shores, an identified drone should take it down. Then serves the Amerikans right.

    Like

  3. Steve says:

    All Cloak & Dagger Stuff … U Hide I Seek, I Seek U Hide

    Like


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