China’s Float Nuclear Power Plant for Artificial Islands


China's planned float nuclear power station for artificial island

China’s planned float nuclear power station for artificial island

China's planned float nuclear power station for artificial island

China’s planned float nuclear power station for artificial island

China's planned float nuclear power station for artificial island

China’s planned float nuclear power station for artificial island

In its July-15 report titled “China media again touts plans to float nuclear reactors in disputed South China Sea”, Reuters talks about Chinese media’s report again on China’s plans to build float nuclear reactors for its artificial islands in the disputed South China Sea.

Why does Reuters say that Chinese media touts again? Reuters reported Chinese media’s report on such reactors on April 22, 2016 titled “China could build nuclear plants for South China Sea, paper says”.

I reblogged Reuters’ report on April 25 using the same title as I usually do in reblogging media’s reports.

However, that was not the first time I mentioned China’s plan to build float nuclear power platform. On July 28, I had a post titled “Photos of Modules of Artificial Island China Plans to Build in Oceans”, in which I posted the above three pictures of the float nuclear power plant that China plans to build for its future float artificial islands in the oceans.

Reuters quotes in its July-15 report an expert with China Nuclear Energy Association who declined to be identified, as saying, “The news is old, it is repeated in reaction to the latest South China Sea disputes”.

The expert did not want to reveal that China has long drawn up plans to build artificial islands not only in the South China Sea but also in vast oceans.

Nuclear power plant is not indispensable for an artificial island built on a reef in the South China Sea as it is not very far away from China’s Hainan Island, but is indispensable for a floating artificial island in the ocean.

Comment by Chan Kai Yee on Reuters’ report, full text of which can be viewed below:

China media again touts plans to float nuclear reactors in disputed South China Sea

China aims to launch a series of offshore nuclear power platforms to promote development in the South China Sea, state media said again on Friday, days after an international court ruled Beijing had no historic claims to most of the waters.

Sovereignty over the South China Sea is contested by China, the Philippines, Vietnam, Malaysia, Brunei and Taiwan, and any move to build nuclear reactors is bound to stoke further tension in the region.

The China Securities Journal said 20 offshore nuclear platforms could eventually be built in the region as the country seeks to “speed up the commercial development” of the South China Sea.

“China’s first floating nuclear reactor will be assembled by the China Shipbuilding Industry Corporation’s (CSIC) subsidiary, Bohai Heavy Industry, and the company will build 20 such reactors in the future,” the newspaper said.

“The marine nuclear power platform will provide energy and freshwater to the Nansha Islands,” it said, referring to the disputed Spratly Islands.

The newspaper was citing a social media post by the China National Nuclear Corporation (CNNC), which has since been deleted.

The Global Times, an influential tabloid published by the ruling Communist Party’s official People’s Daily, announced similar news in April and said the nuclear power platforms could “sail” to remote areas and provide a stable power supply.

“The news is old,” an expert with the China Nuclear Energy Association said. “It is repeated in reaction to the latest South China Sea disputes,” the expert, who declined to be identified, told Reuters.

“Little progress has been made on building such a small reactor.”

Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Lu Kang, asked at a daily news briefing, said he did not know anything about the plans.

Floating reactors were first proposed in the United States in the 1970s but then abandoned. The first demonstration of the technology is due to be launched in Russia next year.

“This will need several years of design and safety analysis before it can go into full construction,” said Li Ning, Dean of the School of Energy Research at Xiamen University.

China’s claims over around 85 percent of the South China Sea, swept by frequent typhoons in the summer months, were declared unlawful by the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague on Tuesday, a decision that Beijing has rejected.

A spokesman for CNNC told Reuters the floating reactors plan had been drawn up by its affiliate, the Nuclear Power Institute of China, and a final decision would be made by CSIC. CSIC was not immediately available for comment.

(Reporting by Kathy Chen and David Stanway; Additional reporting by Ben Blanchard; Editing by Nick Macfie)

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2 Comments on “China’s Float Nuclear Power Plant for Artificial Islands”

  1. Fre Okin says:

    “Nuclear power plant is not indispensable for an artificial island built on a reef in the South China Sea as it is not very far away from China’s Hainan Island, but is indispensable for a floating artificial island in the ocean.”

    China should quickly build many such floating nuclear islands. This kind of power source is indispensable for China to have high powered laser system to fry enemy jets, ships and satellites, even at great distance. US have only limited range with USS Ponce on board laser able to hit small low flying planes. The exact level of power the LaWS will use is unknown but estimated between 15–50 kW for engaging drones, small aircraft and high-speed boats. A nuclear powered source could offer much more power, vastly increasing the laser range.

    The most important use is to fry incoming Standard Missiles 100 NM away, travelling at perhaps Mach 20. Laser speed is speed of light, easily able to track and burn up these missiles before they hit Chinese assets.

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  2. Steve says:

    The floating nuclear power plant is the only and best option for renewable clean energy and freshwater for a faraway engineered island. Its impossible and risky to built a fixed plant on the island. The littoral states of the SCS need open their blinkers respect the work ethics China is producing around the SCS for the sake of resource exploitation and exploration.

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