Taiwan president calls on China to engage in talks


President Tsai Ing-wen waves during National Day celebrations in Taipei, Taiwan, October 10, 2016. REUTERS/Tyrone Siu

President Tsai Ing-wen waves during National Day celebrations in Taipei, Taiwan, October 10, 2016. REUTERS/Tyrone Siu

Taiwan President Tsai Ing-wen on Monday urged China to engage in talks, pledging to maintain peace with the island’s giant neighbor, amid a near five-month impasse after Beijing halted official communications with the self-ruled island.

However, Tsai, in her first National Day speech, stopped short of conceding a crucial principle that Beijing has said is needed for talks to resume, that Taiwan is a part of China, also referred to between the two sides as the “1992 consensus”.

Tsai’s proponents have said she has been holding out olive branches to China, but also choosing her words carefully so as not to lose her key anti-China support base at home.

“The two sides of the Strait should sit down and talk as soon as possible,” Tsai said in her address, referring to the Taiwan Strait that separates the island from the mainland.

The National Day address is used by presidents to lay out their position and outlook on relations with China.

“Anything can be included for discussion, as long as it is conducive to the development of cross-Strait peace and the welfare of people on both sides,” Tsai told foreign and domestic dignitaries in a speech broadcast live on television.

But China’s Taiwan Affairs Office said the “1992 consensus” remained the touchstone by which it would engage with Taiwan and judge Tsai.

“Denying the ‘1992 consensus’, inciting confrontation across the Taiwan Strait and severing socioeconomic and cultural ties is an impassable, evil path,” it said.

Tsai and her Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) took power in late May after a landslide election win over the incumbent Nationalist party.

Beijing distrusts the DPP because it traditionally advocates independence for Taiwan, which China deems a wayward province to be taken back by force if necessary.

Tsai said she would maintain a consistent, predictable and sustainable relationship with China.

She reiterated that the relationship should be based on the “accumulated outcomes enabled by over 20 years of cross-Strait interactions and negotiations since 1992.”

“Our pledges will not change, and our goodwill will not change. But we will not bow to pressure, and we will of course not revert to the old path of confrontation,” she said.

The so-called “1992 consensus”, which was agreed with a China-friendly Nationalist government, acknowledges Taiwan and China are part of a single China, but allows both sides to interpret who is the ruler.

Last week, Tsai appointed a pro-China politician to be her envoy for a meeting of Asia-Pacific leaders next month.

(Additional reporting by Ben Blanchard in Beijing; Editing by Robert Birsel and Clarence Fernandez)

Source: Reuters “Taiwan president calls on China to engage in talks”

Note: This is Reuters report I post here for readers’ information. It does not mean that I agree or disagree with the report’ views.

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5 Comments on “Taiwan president calls on China to engage in talks”

  1. Joseph says:

    Already? How does it take? 5 months only? I thought she can keep it on until the end of his term. Where is her pride on democracy now? Where is the American now? So she needs China after all. It is really an idiotic thing to raise glass to victory before she even achieved it. In reminiscent to Australian Julia Gillard who betrayed her way into being a Prime Minister, Gillard also celebrate her victory as the first Australian prime minister. At the end of her term, nobody celebrated her. She’s just a failure, an idiot and and a misogynist who cared about female dominantion over men than good governance. Similarly Tsai Ingwen would care about her precious democracy than good governance. Even as she begs for China for talk, she is ‘careful’ not to lose her key anti-China base. Now who would want to compromise with someone so hostile? On veiled ‘good will’ hostility some more? If she has brain in her skull at all, she should think what does she have to offer? Among all thing she should be very ‘careful’, she chooses the rubbish agenda of keeping on the anti-China policy. Even American ‘staunchest’ ally Philippines has thrown away that anti-China policy to start their own anti-America policy. So, she wants to rely on mere ‘good will’, she should go to America. See if her master cares about ‘good will’. Taiwan is not Israel after all. Unlike Israel who ‘demands’ aid from the American, Taiwan has to beg hard and there’s still no certainty that the American will give them anything. Stupid Taiwan never put their agents on American senate the way Israel does. Well Taiwan did choose Tsai Ingwen. Now they have to deal with her. Either wait till the end of her term, or discard her immediately before things get as bad as Phillipines.

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  2. Fu Man-Chu says:

    Yes, this woman is reflective of the self-centred, betraying, sell-out type where her personal interest – typical of the malaise in Chinese society – supersedes the national interest. Now that Mr Duterte has shown himself not so pliable to American’s foreign policy demands, it now turns its attention to Ms Tsai who like a weak lonely woman, is so easily enticed by the scoundrels to do its bidding. She betrays her father, her uncles, her brothers, and her nephews. America is no friend of the Chinese and China and in fact seeks her subservience and vassalage, and she would willingly sell her men-folk into bondage to a warmongering, colonizing foreign invader. She has no sense and pride in her own heritage, Chinese history. and Eastern culture. How can a woman like that be a leader?

    Career politicians like Benigno Aquino, Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama, are, as how former British Prime Minister Tony Blair describes them, are shameless opportunists. They have neither deep political convictions or socio-economic beliefs but are psychopathtic in their aim for personal aggrandisement, fortune, glory and status. They are hollow people; criminal type. They are NOT leaders and should NEVER had been candidates for the top chair in any country in the first place. How did they become candidates beggars the question – Were they Washington’s, particularly its State department’s, appointees? And whose election were rigged by covert American operatives? The way the American elections is currently and so blatantly being rigged to ensure Hillary Clinton wins it and become the next President?

    Question : What are you going to do about this Mr Xi? Continue to sit like a frozen buddha statue and let American clobber and humilate you and win at every turn and allow events to so continue to so “CO-INCIDENTALLY” develop in America’s favor?

    Like

    • Wu Bi-bo says:

      Yeah, Mr Xi ought to be careful. Taiwan IS another “Ukraine”. Ms Tai’s election was an American “coup de etat”. If a referendum or honest poll was held in Taiwan, probably half or more of its people would vote to remain or amalgamate with China. But of course, the Americans would never have it their way. If they do, it would just be a massive fraud or con job. Is Xi equal to Mr Putin? No.

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  3. Steve says:

    What a traitorous scumbag! Tsai, a low class politician is becoming quite an expert in the US Art of deception and lies. The US are Masters of creating chaos, anarchy and poverty on foreign soil. The problem with Tsai is that chaos and poverty may prevail in Taiwan should military unification becomes the only option and she should be thrown in jail for terrorism and separatism
    by Beijing. In short, Tsai is a complete idiot, she is on an evil path of Taiwan destruction. Just a few days ago, she requested an unconditional meeting with China’s President. She either love herself too much or foolhardy. Taiwan is inherently part of China and can never be separated.

    Like

  4. alking1957 says:

    Goodwill? There is no goodwill from tsai. No 1992 concensus = no good will whatsoever

    Like


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