China’s Xi vows zero tolerance for separatist movements


China's President Xi Jinping delivers a speech at a conference commemorating the 150th birth anniversary of Sun Yat-Sen, widely recognised as the father of modern China, at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, China, November 11, 2016. REUTERS/Jason Lee

China’s President Xi Jinping delivers a speech at a conference commemorating the 150th birth anniversary of Sun Yat-Sen, widely recognised as the father of modern China, at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, China, November 11, 2016. REUTERS/Jason Lee

China will never allow any part of its territory to break off, President Xi Jinping said on Friday, within a week of reining in Hong Kong independence moves and ignoring Taiwan’s urging to heed democratic aspirations in the Asian financial hub.

Xi made the comments at an event in Beijing’s Great Hall of the People to mark 150 years since the birth of Sun Yat-Sen, China’s latest bid to exploit the legacy of a man many view as the founder of the modern nation.

“We will never allow any person, any group, any political party, at any time, in any way, to split from China any part of its territory,” said Xi, who is also general secretary of the ruling Communist Party.

“To uphold our national sovereignty and territorial integrity, to never let our country split again and to never let history repeat itself – these are our solemn promises to our people and to our history.”

China’s parliament on Monday passed a ruling effectively barring two elected Hong Kong pro-independence politicians from taking office, Beijing’s most direct intervention in the territory’s affairs since the 1997 handover.

Recalling Sun Yat-Sen’s belief in a united nation, Xi urged people in China and Taiwan, as well as ethnic Chinese around the world, to oppose independence for Taiwan.

“Any Taiwanese political party, organization or individual – regardless of what they have advocated for in the past – as long as they recognize the “1992 consensus,” as long as they recognize the mainland and Taiwan are one China, we are willing to associate with them,” Xi added.

The “1992 consensus”, agreed with Taiwan’s previous China-friendly Nationalist government, acknowledges Taiwan and China are part of a single China, but allows both sides to interpret who is the ruler.

Beijing has halted official communication with self-ruled Taiwan because the government of President Tsai Ing-wen, the leader of the independence-leaning Democratic Progressive Party (DPP), refuses to acknowledge this “one China” principle.

In the Chinese capital this month, Xi met Hung Hsiu-chu, the chief of Taiwan’s opposition Nationalists, who has said the party holds out the possibility of a peace pact with China.

(This story has been refiled to correct translation of quote in third paragraph)

(Reporting by Sue-Lin Wong; Additional reporting by J.R. Wu in Taipei; Editing by Clarence Fernandez)

Source: Reuters “China’s Xi vows zero tolerance for separatist movements”

Note: This is Reuters report I post here for readers’ information. It does not mean that I agree or disagree with the report’ views.

Related post
Clash of Civilizations in Hong Kong over Pursuit of Independence dated November 9

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3 Comments on “China’s Xi vows zero tolerance for separatist movements”

  1. johnleecan says:

    Hong Kong police using pepper spray isn’t going to work when protesters use umbrellas to block the pepper spray.

    It should be the PLA that should face the Hong Kong protesters. Bullets would certainly pass thru their umbrellas.

    So sick of these Hongkies.

    Like

  2. Fre Okin says:

    It is clear the two separatist independence kids Collaborate with their counterpart in Taiwan. The ‘boy’ went to Taiwan to meet his counterpart, scheming how to stir up tension, so the insulting behavior in the Legislature is Premeditated to insult China. China therefore have every right to give them a giant slap down.

    Now that China have made it clear who is boss, China should ‘guide’ the judicial review panel to make a conditional reprieve, allowing the two kids to make a Sincere Oath Taking Televised to the Hong Kong people After they make a Formal Apology To Beijing. This will show China exhibit leniency toward them and is good for her image.

    The truth is the independence people are a very small minority in the Legislature, so their presence means nothing. China should just let them fight a hopeless battle from within the legislature, much like how the Japanese strangle the Okinawans through legislative means.

    It is better to just Ignore them than inflaming the situation further.

    Like

    • Steve says:

      Formal apology means nothing..These are habitually hardened offenders of China’s rulership.
      Even in Singapore during the early days of PM Lee Kuan Yew, his rulership in Singapore was based on dictatorship and democracy in order to educate Singaporeans and establish a rule based society. Western style democracy will send China’s politics into a bottomless pit of corruption and an uncertain future with 1.3 billion people. Even President Duterte prefers Socialism than democracy to alleviate Filipinos from corruption/poverty.

      These corrupt ‘kids’ has no sense of moral cultural and responsibility of China as a nation faced with external and internal problems. They should be barred from legal office. They have adequate memberships of pro independent supporters including lawyers and can easily take HK by storm in street riots. Formal apologies by HK pro independent leaders on television will make China’s CCP look Inept and weak. These pro independent leadership will strengthen rather than weaken and regarded as traitors by their followers should the leaders apologise on TV. Everything starts from the mind and university students will follow the team leaders rather than the political wisdom of a nation.

      The real problem is Taiwan. Apologies are irrelevant, war, unfortunately maybe the end result.

      Like


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