China’s Great Progress in Making Homegrown Aircraft Engines


China’s Su-35 copycat, the J-11. Photo: SCMP pictures

China’s Su-35 copycat, the J-11. Photo: SCMP pictures

SCMP says in its report “China powers up military jet engine tech to wean itself off Russian imports” today that China has made huge investment in developing homegrown aircraft engines so that it was able to make 400 WS-10 turbofans last year for its J-10 and J-11 fighters and no longer needed Russian engines for them.

As Russia is unwilling to sell China its advanced 117S engines used in its well-known Su-35 fighter jets, China will use homegrown engines in its newly developed J-11D fighter jet that SCMP regards as China’s homegrown version of the Su-35

SCMP quotes Andrei Chang, founder of the Canada-based Kanwa Defence Review, as saying that China has newly established Aeroengine Corporation of China to concentrate resources for engine development. The corporation has 24 units and about 10,000 employees. According to Chang, China regards engine production as priority, has put quite a lot of resources into engine development over the past two or three years to boost engine industry.

SCMP says “China could also be working on a more advanced engine (than WS-10).” But “A staff member from Aero­engine would not comment on its plans for the engines that would power the J-15 and the J-20 stealth jets.”

Full text of SCMP’s report can be found at http://www.scmp.com/news/china/article/2053741/china-powers-military-jet-engine-tech-wean-itself-russian-imports

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7 Comments on “China’s Great Progress in Making Homegrown Aircraft Engines”

  1. Foxhound says:

    “…it was able to make 400 WS-10 turbofans …”

    A couple of years ago, I read an article about chinese homegrown jet engines. ChinaSignpost foresaw between 2015-2022 China might be able to produce reliable jet engines. As we can see, Chinasignpost did not fail to foresee a such prediction.
    It is a very good news for China, nowadays we can consider China as real super power able to oppose the West. It is fair to foresee in two years China’s power will overpass US.

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  2. Steve says:

    Copycat is wrongly used. China should be known as the GreatCat of modern aviation.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Fre Okin says:

    J 11D must have very strong body frame, good avionics, long range near hypersonic missiles and of course high thrust engine to give her high maneuverability and good pilot training to survive an encounter with F22. Working in at least a pair, F22 will be dead as the second J11D will take her out once she fire and her position is known. The first J11D targeted by F22 could escape by a hair, a few meter perhaps.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Steve says:

      I could be wrong, but J-10C has better manoeuvrability than the J-11D, against the F22. In anyway, both will be used against the F22.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Foxhound says:

      The first J11D targeted by F22 could escape by a hair, a few meter perhaps….

      Do not take credit about any US air superiority. The F-22 is a total faillure,
      “When USAF chief of staff was aked wether he really believes claims he makes about F22, answer was “I express opinions about F22 that I am told to express…” -See picard blog –
      At the beginning of this story, the Pentagone planned to buy at least 750 aircrafts-if not 1.000-. The purpose in that time was to replace all the fleet of F-15. At that time in US we talked about supremacy, and not superiority -another Lockheed’s fantasy-.
      In fact nowadays only 180 were bought. On 180 how much are ready for combat ? It is classified, but the rate of availlability could not exceed, in the best case 30%. In the best case.
      Robert Gates in 2009 closed definitely the production, ending the hope to upgrade this aircraft.
      Regarding the strategic balance that is prevailling nowadays in the middle east, in order to keep its world leadership, US has none alternatives other than to intervene directly in the conflict, to overthrow the legal syrian governement.
      But to intervene directly, they need a total air supremacy. Else they could not intervene. Then they need tools, but the tools of supremacy could not be relying on F-22. Hence they did not intervene in Syria.
      I think this example is enough to give you a fair representation of what the F-22 is. A mere myth. The F-22 could be effective during the early 2000’s against old libyan, or iraqi air defense. But not enough against modern syrian -russian/chinese origin- air defense.
      Back to the J-11, this fighter has nothing to fear against any western opponent.

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      • Steve says:

        True – according to China’s aviation think tank, the F22s has NOT been used extensively in the Middle East like the F15/16 except for a couple of bombing sorties in Libya(?) because there was no danger of being shot down. It is highly unusual for the Americans not to test the F22s in the Middle East extensively. Even China’s fighter pilots occasional encounter with the F22s across the ECS said that the F22s appears to be nothing special. Although the F22s are designed for penetration deep into enemy territory due to its stealth anti radar detection cross section, but as a fighter jet, it could be inferior. When the Russians send the SU-35s into Syria, the US would not dare send the F22s.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Foxhound says:

          However the F-22 Raptor shoulld be considered as an excellent aircraft, but not enough to allow US to acquire an air supremacy.

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