U.S. gets warm words from China’s Xi ahead of Trump visit


U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson (L) shakes hands with Chinese President Xi Jinping (R) before their meeting at the Great Hall of the People on September 30, 2017 in Beijing, China. REUTERS/Lintao Zhang/Pool

Reuters Staff September 30, 2017 / 9:22 PM

BEIJING (Reuters) – Chinese President Xi Jinping offered warm words for U.S. President Donald Trump on Saturday, calling him a friend and saying he expected Trump’s visit to China in November would be “wonderful”.

China’s relationship with the United States has been strained by the Trump administration’s criticism of Chinese trade practices and by demands that Beijing do more to pressure North Korea to halt its nuclear weapons and missiles programs.

Xi and Trump met for the first time in person at Trump’s Mar-a-Lago estate in Florida in April. Trump has since played up his personal relationship with Xi, even when criticizing China over North Korea and trade.

Meeting U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson at Beijing’s Great Hall of the People, Xi said he had enjoyed his meetings with Trump and that the two had made considerable efforts to push the development of China-US relations.

“The two of us have also maintained a good working relationship and personal friendship,” Xi said, in comments in front of reporters.

“I believe that President Trump’s upcoming visit to China means an important opportunity for the further development of China-U.S. relations,” Xi added. “And I believe his visit will be a special, wonderful and successful one.”

In comments later reported by China’s Foreign Ministry, Xi added that cooperation was the only correct choice for both countries, whose common interests far outweighed their differences.

Both countries must “on the basis of respecting each other’s core interests and important concerns appropriately handle, via dialogue and consultations, differences and sensitive issues”, the statement cited Xi as saying.

Trump will travel to Asia in November for the first time since becoming president, stopping in Japan, South Korea, China, Vietnam and the Philippines on a trip expected to be dominated by the North Korea nuclear threat.

Tillerson told Xi that Trump and his wife Melania were looking forward to going to Beijing.

“This is a relationship that continues to grow and mature on the strength of the relationship between yourself and President Trump. And we look forward to advancing that relationship at the upcoming summit,” he said.

There was no mention of North Korea in comments made in front of journalists at any of Tillerson’s meetings, which also included top diplomat State Councillor Yang Jiechi and Foreign Minister Wang Yi.

China’s Foreign Ministry, in separate statements on Tillerson’s meetings with Yang and WanWang, simply said they exchanged views on the situation on the Korean peninsula, without elaborating.

Reporting by Phil Stewart and Ben Blanchard; Editing by Andrew Bolton

Source: Reuters “U.S. gets warm words from China’s Xi ahead of Trump visit”

Note: This is Reuters’ report I post here for readers’ information. It does not mean that I agree or disagree with the report’ views.


China’s CH-5 UAV conducts live-fire trial with new precision weapon


CASC’s latest CH-5 armed reconnaissance UAV pictured with guided weapons during a 21 September test at an undisclosed airport in north-western China. Source: Jane’s sources

Kelvin Wong – IHS Jane’s International Defence Review

25 September 2017

Key Points
•The China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation integrated a new 80 kg precision guided missile on its Cai Hong 5 armed reconnaissance UAV
•The latest test in northwestern China also enabled engineers to refine the CH-5’s sensor systems as well as its payload release mechanisms

China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation (CASC) has successfully integrated and launched a new precision guided missile (PGM) on its Cai Hong 5 (Rainbow 5, or CH-5) strike-capable, medium-altitude long-endurance unmanned aerial vehicle (MALE UAV), Jane’s sources have confirmed.

The latest test was staged out of an undisclosed airport in the northwestern province of Gansu during the morning of 21 September, with CASC engineers successfully deploying a new 80 kg-class PGM – carrying a blast fragmentation warhead – via lock-on before launch (LOBL) targeting protocols from a production-model CH-5 at a launch altitude of 11,482 ft.

Further details of the new PGM were not disclosed, although it is understood that the latest effort also enabled engineers to further test and fine-tune the CH-5’s electro-optical/infrared (EO/IR) payload as well as its weapons targeting and rail-mounted payload release mechanisms.

“We demonstrated the CH-5’s ability to win the initiative in any battlefield with its reconnaissance and strike ability, and our latest success exemplifies the maturity of our advanced products,” a company spokesperson told Jane’s .

Company sources also revealed to Jane’s that the 45 kg-class AR-1 semi-active laser (SAL) anti-armour missile was successfully integrated and certified for delivery aboard the CH-5 in August.

Source: IHS Jane’s 360 “China’s CH-5 UAV conducts live-fire trial with new precision weapon”

Note: This is IHS Jane’s 360’s report I post here for readers’ information. It does not mean that I agree or disagree with the report’ views.


Official: China Has Formally Commissioned J-20 Stealth Fighter Jet


J-20 commission ceremony. mil.huanqiu.com photo

Mil.huanqiu.com says in its report on September 28 that Chinese Defense Ministry spokesman Wu Qian said in reply to a reporter’s question at the Ministry’s press conference that J-20 has already been formally commissioned in the military and that follow-up test flights are being carried out.

Source: mil.huanqiu.com “J-20 formally commissioned in Chinese military: Follow-up test flights are being carried out” (summary by Chan Kai Yee based on the report in Chinese)


Philippines, China, Malaysia’s Jointly Exploit South China Sea Energy


China’s deep sea oil rig. mil.huanqiu.com photo

China’s mil.huanqiu.com says in its report “Philippines promotes Philippine-China joint exploitation in the South China Sea: Draft Contract has been submitted to Philippine President” yesterday that Philippines’ ABS-CBN news website says in its report on September 28 that Philippine government is promoting a win-win scheme with other South China Sea claimants to jointly explore oil and gas in disputed waters.

In addition “Philippine Star” reported on the same day that Philippine side’s draft contract on joint exploration of the oil and gas resources in Palawan has been submitted to President Duterte for examination and approval. The exploration will be conducted by a joint venture between China, the Philippines and Malaysia in an area to the northwest of Palawan.

This blogger’s comment:
The disputes among China, the Philippines, Malaysia, Vietnam and Brunei in the South China Sea are mainly over the oil and gas resourced there, the above-mentioned model of win-win cooperation among China, the Philippines and Malaysia will set an example for the peaceful solution of the disputes. As a result, countries outside the region will have no excuse to interfere with the disputes.

That is China’s victory as China has all along advocated putting aside the dispute to jointly exploit the resources. Philippine ex-president Aquino wanted to exploit the resources alone. Instigated by the US, he started and won an arbitration but got nothing as the US does not want to fight a war with China to impose the arbitration award.

Seeing that China is capable of exploiting all the resources while the Philippines can get nothing if it is so greedy as to get the resources alone, Aquino’s successor is wise to cooperate with China and other claimants to exploit the resources jointly.

Comment by Chan Kai Yee on mil.huanqiu.com’s report, summary translation of which is provided here. Full text of the report in Chinese can be viewed at http://mil.huanqiu.com/world/2017-09/11295927.html.


China says one step forwards, two steps back no good for Japan ties


Reuters Staff September 29, 2017 / 4:36 PM

BEIJING (Reuters) – China’s foreign minister on Thursday said that ties with Japan should not take two steps back for every step forward, after Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe made a rare appearance at an anniversary event for the normalization of diplomatic relations.

Speaking on the eve of the 45th anniversary of the resumption of ties between Beijing and Tokyo, Foreign Minister Wang Yi told Japan’s ambassador to China, Yutaka Yokoi, that he hoped for greater improvement in relations.

“We hope that the Japanese government can pursue a more positive policy towards China… and not take one step back for each step forward, even two steps back for each step forward,” Wang said, according to a statement released on the ministry website on Friday.

Relations have been complicated for decades by the legacy of Japan’s wartime aggression, as well as by a festering territorial dispute in the East China Sea.

Abe on Thursday evening made an appearance at a Chinese embassy event in Tokyo that jointly celebrated the anniversary as well as China’s Oct 1 National Day.

Wang called the appearance “good news” and added: “We hope for more good news in China-Japan relations and not for bad news to follow shortly after good news.”

Chinese Premier Li Keqiang and Abe also exchanged congratulatory messages on Friday, in which Li said that the two countries should “properly manage and control their contradictions and differences”, China’s official Xinhua news agency reported.

Japan’s cabinet on Thursday announced Oct. 22 as the date of a snap election where Abe, a conservative who returned to power in 2012, hopes a recent boost in voter support will help his Liberal Democratic Party-led coalition maintain a simple majority. It now holds a two-thirds “super” majority.

Reporting by Christian Shepherd; Editing by Nick Macfie

Source: Reuters “China says one step forwards, two steps back no good for Japan ties”

Note: This is Reuters’ report I post here for readers’ information. It does not mean that I agree or disagree with the report’ views.


China’s T-ray Radar Able to Penetrate Anti-Detection Stealth Coatings


Researchers are working on T-ray technology to identify and track stealth aircraft. Photo: AP

SCMP says in its report “China powers up new radar tech to unmask stealth fighters” on September 27, “China’s biggest arms manufacturer has tested a new instrument to detect stealth aircraft, technology that could be a military “game changer” if mounted on a satellite or plane, scientists say.” “Terahertz radars are already capable of finding a concealed weapon in a crowd from hundreds of metres away, and a more powerful version is under development to put on an early warning aircraft or satellite to identify and track military aircraft, including the US’ F-22 and F-35 stealth fighters.”

The device is bulky and heavy to be installed on a satellite or airplane, but efforts are being made to reduce its size and weight.

China has developed some radars to detect stealth warplanes but there is doubt whether the radars really work. Experts are sure terahertz radars can do the job but it takes time to develop usable devices.

Comment by Chan Kai Yee on SCMP’s report, full text of which can be found at http://www.scmp.com/news/china/society/article/2113113/china-powers-new-radar-tech-unmask-stealth-fighters?utm_source=SupChina&utm_campaign=a99f2456d8-20170928-387+SteveBannonChina&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_caef3ab334-a99f2456d8-164862477


China’s COMAC says C919 jet completed second test flight


China’s domestically developed C919 passenger jet is seen during its second test flight near Pudong International Airport in Shanghai, China September 28, 2017. China Daily via REUTERS

Brenda Goh September 28, 2017

SHANGHAI (Reuters) – China’s domestically developed C919 passenger jet completed its second test flight on Thursday, the jet’s maker said, but the duration and near five-month gap since its first flight have raised questions over whether its latest delivery target can be met.

The narrow-body C919, which will compete with Boeing Co’s (BA.N) 737 and the Airbus SE (AIR.PA) A320, is a symbol of China’s ambition to muscle into a global jet market estimated to be worth $2 trillion over the next 20 years.

However, the program has faced lengthy delays and missed its original target of delivery to customers by 2016 – a date reportedly pushed back to 2020. Sales to date have been restricted largely to its home market because it has yet to be certified by regulators in the United States and Europe.

Thursday’s flight was the second for the initial C919 test model, whose maiden flight was on May 5. The second of six planned test aircraft, which achieved power-on of its systems in July, has yet to fly.

Commercial Aircraft Corp of China Ltd (COMAC) [CMAFC.UL] said the plane reached an altitude of 10,000 feet during a flight that took off from Shanghai’s Pudong Airport at 07:22 a.m. (2322 GMT) and landed at 10:08 a.m.

“Various elements of the test flight, including with the raising/lowering of the landing gear, were all completed smoothly,” COMAC said in a statement.

The 166-minute flight time was more than double the maiden flight of 80 minutes, but 54 minutes shorter than plans detailed in an article published by state-backed news website ThePaper.cn earlier on Thursday. COMAC did not immediately reply to questions from Reuters on whether the flight was shorter than planned.

Bradley Perrett, a veteran China watcher and reporter at Aviation Week, said the five-month interval between the aircraft’s two flights was “extraordinary” and COMAC’s reported delivery target of 2020 appeared not to be firm.

“The conclusion must be that COMAC was not really ready for flight testing in May,” Perrett said in an article published on Wednesday. “A common view is that the C919 was put into the air so early for strictly political reasons, although there is no suggestion that doing so was unsafe.”

Mitsubishi Heavy Industry Industries Ltd’s (7011.T), Mitsubishi Regional Jet – Japan’s first passenger aircraft – took its second flight eight days after it first flew in 2015 while the gap between the first and second flight for the Airbus A350 was five days, Perrett said.

Strongly backed by China’s government, COMAC has so far announced orders for 730 C919 planes from 27 customers, many of which are Chinese leasing companies.

Though billed as homemade, the C919 relies on overseas technology from firms including General Electric Co (GE.N), France’s Safran SA (SAF.PA), Honeywell International Inc (HON.N) and United Technologies Corp (UTX.N).

COMAC also said its ARJ21 regional jet was in the air at the same time as the C919 on Thursday, marking the first time two types of domestically made passenger jets have taken to China’s skies simultaneously.

Reporting by Brenda Goh; Additional reporting by Jamie Freed and Adam Jourdan; Editing by Stephen Coates and Muralikumar Anantharaman

Source: Reuters “China’s COMAC says C919 jet completed second test flight”

Note: This is Reuters’ report I post here for readers’ information. It does not mean that I agree or disagree with the report’ views.


China’s Mad Scientists May Have Created a New Way to Sink U.S. Aircraft Carriers


CH-T4 Solar Drone Electric UAV China CAAA

Dave Majumdar September 21, 2017

What Lin and Singer don’t mention is that these capabilities will make the CH-T4 an excellent asset in China’s quest to hold America’s aircraft carriers at risk in the Western Pacific. Much of the attention given to that effort focuses on China’s so-called “carrier-killer” missile, the DF-21D. But as I noted last week in relation to North Korea, the missile itself is only one piece of the puzzle. Even more important is the sophisticated “kill chain” of surveillance, radar and communications systems needed to track and provide updated targeting information to the antiship ballistic missile while it is in flight.

The Pentagon just released its annual report on China’s military power, which once again highlighted Beijing’s efforts to put American aircraft carriers at risk. Right on cue, China announced a major milestone for a system that might be a key component of its antiaccess/area-denial (A2/AD) strategy.

This week, Chinese state media reported that the Caihong-T 4 (CH-T4), China’s massive, solar-powered drone, for the first time flew at an altitude of twenty thousand meters. This is important because there are no clouds above twenty thousand meters, which allows solar-powered drones to operate for significantly longer periods of time.

How long? Basically, indefinitely. According to China Daily, “future improvements will enable it to remain aloft several months or even several years.”

Jeffrey Lin and P.W. Singer, who write the excellent Eastern Arsenal blog, note that the CH-T4 is an impressive combination of big and light. The drone’s wingspan is around 130 feet, which is wider than a Boeing 737. At the same time, the CH-T4 only weighs between 880 and 1,100 pounds. By way of comparison, Boeing 737’s lowest typical operating empty weight is over seventy thousand pounds, and its maximum gross takeoff weight can reach as high as 170,000 pounds. Besides being slender, the CH-T4’s lightness is due to its carbon fiber and plastic components.

The drone can also travel at speeds of 125 miles per hour. However, it will also be able to cruise at sixty-five thousand feet, so it will be able to cover a huge swath of land without moving very far. Indeed, Lin and Singer point out: “It can utilize its high flight ceiling to maintain line-of-sight contact with over 400,000 square miles of ground and water. That’s about the size of Egypt. For both militaries and tech firms, covering so much territory makes it an excellent data relay and communications node.”

What Lin and Singer don’t mention is that these capabilities will make the CH-T4 an excellent asset in China’s quest to hold America’s aircraft carriers at risk in the Western Pacific. Much of the attention given to that effort focuses on China’s so-called “carrier-killer” missile, the DF-21D. But as I noted last week in relation to North Korea, the missile itself is only one piece of the puzzle. Even more important is the sophisticated “kill chain” of surveillance, radar and communications systems needed to track and provide updated targeting information to the antiship ballistic missile while it is in flight.

Publicly available information indicates that America’s efforts to defeat China’s antiaccess/area-denial strategies focus on disrupting this “kill chain.” For example, in 2013, then chief of naval operations Jonathan Greenert and then Air Force chief of staff Gen. Mark Welsh coauthored an essay in Foreign Policy on how Air-Sea Battle intended to overcome A2/AD threats. In the article, they wrote that “Air-Sea Battle defeats threats to access by, first, disrupting an adversary’s command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (C4ISR) systems; second, destroying adversary weapons launchers (including aircraft, ships, and missile sites); and finally, defeating the weapons an adversary launches.”

The logic of this approach, they argued, is that it “exploits the fact that, to attack our forces, an adversary must complete a sequence of actions, commonly referred to as a ‘kill chain.’ For example, surveillance systems locate U.S. forces, communications networks relay targeting information to weapons launchers, weapons are launched, and then they must hone in on U.S. forces. Each of these steps is vulnerable to interdiction or disruption, and because each step must work, our forces can focus on the weakest links in the chain, not each and every one.”

Once it is operational, the CH-T4 will complicate these efforts by increasing the redundancies in China’s kill chain. For instance, if America is able to disrupt or destroy Chinese satellites, Beijing can rely on the drone to provide the information necessary to track American ships. The CH-T4 will have other comparable advantages over other surveillance systems. On the one hand, they will be cheaper and more flexible than satellites, while at the same time flying higher and farther away from the battlefield than different surveillance aircraft and ships. This combination will make it more difficult for Washington to destroy the surveillance step of the kill chain, although it could still focus on other steps such as disrupting the communication networks.

None of this is news to the U.S. military. Although the Pentagon’s newest report on China’s military didn’t mention the CH-T4 by name, it did note that “the acquisition and development of longer-range unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) will increase China’s ability to conduct long-range ISR and strike operations.”

Fortunately, the U.S. military will have some time to figure out its response, as China Daily reports that it will “take several years for designers and engineers to improve and test the aircraft before it is delivered to users.” If the United States’ own record at developing this type of technology is any guide, Beijing should expect a few more hiccups along the way. NASA’s Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) began working on the Helios Prototype well over a decade ago. In 2001, it completed an important milestone by flying at an altitude of ninety-six thousand feet (29,260 meters). Yet a Helios crashed during a flight test just two years later. Europe, meanwhile, is also trying to develop so-called pseudo satellites.

Zachary Keck is the former managing editor of The National Interest. You can find him on Twitter: @ZacharyKeck.

Source: National Interest “China’s Mad Scientists May Have Created a New Way to Sink U.S. Aircraft Carriers”

Note: This is National Interest’s article I post here for readers’ information. It does not mean that I agree or disagree with the article’s views.


Why the World Should Fear China’s Military (Exports)


Ron Matthews,Xiaojuan Ping September 27, 2017

Is China’s arms export strategy really a success story? The first question is to establish whether there has been dramatic growth in China’s arms exports, emulating the success of its broader commercial exports. While the picture is not equivocal, there are signs that something is indeed happening.

Chinese arms sales are growing. Across 2012–16, they accounted for 6.2 per cent of the global arms trade, up by an impressive 74 per cent compared to 2007–11. In fact, over 2012–16, China’s arms exports raced ahead of those from Germany, France and the United Kingdom, making China the world’s third biggest arms exporter.

This is not a short-term aberration, but a long-term trend. Between 2000 and 2015, Chinese arms exports expanded by a factor of 6.5. In 2016, China shipped US$2.1 billion in arms, marginally behind France’s US$2.2 billion, but well ahead of the United Kingdom’s US$1.4 billion. While China’s 2016 market share is well below that of the United States at 33 per cent, the gap is gradually closing with Russia (23 per cent), and has disappeared altogether with France (6 per cent), Germany (5.6 per cent) and the United Kingdom (4.6 per cent).

China’s arms exports have been criticised for lacking global appeal since 72 per cent of all exports in the last five years went to just three countries: Pakistan, Bangladesh and Myanmar. Yet, this criticism is unfair. Such dependence on a few core customers affects both mature and ‘new entrant’ arms exporters alike.

Russia was the world’s second biggest arms exporter across 2012–16 but relied on just four countries — India, Vietnam, China and Algeria — for 70 per cent of those sales. Likewise, 71 per cent of UK arms exports go to India, the United States and Saudi Arabia (which alone accounted for half of all UK sales across 2010–15).

Is China’s arms export strategy really a success story? The first question is to establish whether there has been dramatic growth in China’s arms exports, emulating the success of its broader commercial exports. While the picture is not equivocal, there are signs that something is indeed happening.

Chinese arms sales are growing. Across 2012–16, they accounted for 6.2 per cent of the global arms trade, up by an impressive 74 per cent compared to 2007–11. In fact, over 2012–16, China’s arms exports raced ahead of those from Germany, France and the United Kingdom, making China the world’s third biggest arms exporter.

This is not a short-term aberration, but a long-term trend. Between 2000 and 2015, Chinese arms exports expanded by a factor of 6.5. In 2016, China shipped US$2.1 billion in arms, marginally behind France’s US$2.2 billion, but well ahead of the United Kingdom’s US$1.4 billion. While China’s 2016 market share is well below that of the United States at 33 per cent, the gap is gradually closing with Russia (23 per cent), and has disappeared altogether with France (6 per cent), Germany (5.6 per cent) and the United Kingdom (4.6 per cent).

China’s arms exports have been criticised for lacking global appeal since 72 per cent of all exports in the last five years went to just three countries: Pakistan, Bangladesh and Myanmar. Yet, this criticism is unfair. Such dependence on a few core customers affects both mature and ‘new entrant’ arms exporters alike.

Russia was the world’s second biggest arms exporter across 2012–16 but relied on just four countries — India, Vietnam, China and Algeria — for 70 per cent of those sales. Likewise, 71 per cent of UK arms exports go to India, the United States and Saudi Arabia (which alone accounted for half of all UK sales across 2010–15).

The Chinese arms export model has several other significant features. From a Chinese strategic perspective, it leverages strong client-state relationships and in the process bolsters Beijing’s influence, particularly among neighbouring states. It is no accident that China’s arms sales to Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh and Myanmar indirectly act to contain the potential threat of Asia’s other mega-power, India. Chinese arms are also competitively packaged. Pricing is low compared to Western models. Chinese drones, for example, reportedly cost 10–20 per cent of the near-equivalent US version. Finally, China is amenable to technology transfer through defence offset, supporting client states to indigenise maintenance, repair and overhaul activities and even produce components.

While it may not yet be the dominant player, China’s arms export strategy has proved effective in taking market share from competitor nations. China has also begun to encroach into higher income markets, especially where technological sophistication is not required. There is a long-term strategy at work here, driven by diplomatic and geostrategic objectives, not commercial gain.

Ron Matthews is Chair of Defence Economics at the Centre for Defence Management and Leadership, Cranfield University and the Defence Academy of the United Kingdom.

Xiaojuan Ping is a researcher at the East Asian Institute, National University of Singapore.

Source: National Interest “Why the World Should Fear China’s Military (Exports)”

Note: This is National Interest’s article I post here for readers’ information. It does not mean that I agree or disagree with the article’s views.


China’s showing off its new helicopters


A peek into the China Helicopter Expo.

By Jeffrey Lin and P.W. Singer September 21, 2017

Z-10
The Z-10, with colored smoke dispensers, makes a flyby during aerobatic maneuvers at the 4th China Helicopter Expo.
WeChat, via by78

At the 4th China Helicopter Exposition, an airshow in Tianjin, the nation flaunted its latest in aviation tech. Here are the highlights:

High Speed Helicopter
This ultra fast helicopter by AVIC uses push propellers (possibly turboprops) and rotor blades to reach speeds of more than 250 mph.
by78

Of particular note was a high-speed aircraft with a 5.5-ton dual-rotor compound set-up. It’s got the narrow fuselage of a conventional helicopter but with two long wings, each with a three-blade rotor on top horizontally aligned turboprop engine below. While the rotor/turboprop combination may be heavier than the tiltorotor found on the U.S.-made MV-22, it is expected to be less expensive to maintain.

It’s arguably China’s first baby step in the world of high-speed helicopters. It has a payload of only 7 people or 1,500 pounds, but an impressive top speed of about 200mph, and a range of over 620 miles.

The Z-19 is now fitted with an array radar mast to attack enemy tanks from beyond the line of sight.
fyjs.cn

Z-19A, the attack/scout helicopter built by the Harbin Aviation Industrial Group, made its public debut, showing off a mast-mounted, electronically scanned array radar above its primary rotor. Similar to the An/APG-78 Longbow radar on the American AH-64D Apache, the ESA radar, which operates in the millimeter band, has high enough resolution to identify enemy tanks and other vehicles. This will allow the Z-19 to hide behind an obstacle, with only the mast mounted radar exposed, and stealthily attack enemy tanks with fire.

A Chorus Line of Attack Helicopters
Z-10s line up for fueling and preflight checkups.
WeChat, via by78

China’s other attack helicopter, the heavier Z-10, is being fitted with twin turboshaft engines, an improvement over its current 1000kW WZ-9 engines. This new Z-10 variant, the Z-10ME, will also feature heavier armor and improved electrical systems.

Also revealed: the 1600kW WZ-10 turboshaft engine, which will be used to power the Z-20 medium utility helicopter. The Z-20 will compete to replace the S-70 Blackhawk, Ka-27, and Mi-171 helicopters in the transport, search and rescue, and anti-submarine roles.

TB-001
This attack drone can carry about a ton of payload.
WeChat, via by78

Other projects were still in their miniature model forms. For example, a new Chinese attack drone, the 2.8-ton Tengoen TB-001, made its debut. Armed with glide bombs, anti-tank missiles, and laser-guided munitions, it has enough fuel for 35 hours of operations. With satellite communications, it can be operated up to 1,860 miles away from the ground control station.

Mi-46
The Sino-Russian answer to the US CH-53K King Stallion, the Mi-46 can carry an impressive 15 tons of payload 500 miles away.
mil.huanqiu.com

And, finally, attendees could spot the aerospace efforts of a China-Russia partnership. The Mi-46 heavy-lift transport helicopter, which made an appearance at the exposition, has a maximum takeoff weight of 38.7 tons, a 15-ton external payload, and a range of about 500 miles. This puts its capabilities roughly in line with the U.S. Marine Corps’ CH-53K King Stallion heavy-lift helicopter. Chinese forces would use the Mi46 for combat and supply operations at high altitudes, as well as long-distance amphibious assault operations and for battlefield supply and transport missions. It’s also the right size to be based on the future Type 075 landing helicopter dock warship, which will be deployed for both humanitarian and combat operations at sea.

Source: Popular Science “China’s showing off its new helicopters”

Note: This is Popular Science’s report I post here for readers’ information. It does not mean that I agree or disagree with the report’ views