China’s New Anti-stealth Radars Enable Killing F-35 Hundreds Km Away


China’s anti-stealth radar. Global Times’ photo

Global Times give a description of China’s new 4th-generation anti-stealth radars displayed at Paris air show that has just closed this week.

China’s integrated anti-stealth radar systems of YLC-8B, SLC-7 and SLC-12 radars and JY-27A, JY-26 and JYL-1A radars can not only detect and accurately find the position of stealth aircrafts but also guide missiles to shoot down them.

As a result, F-22s and F-35s are utterly unable to come close to China’s coasts to attack China.

The above-mentioned anti-stealth radars represent world most advanced long-range radar technologies.

They mark the speedy application of the integration of the coordinate surveillance and combined active and passive monitoring technologies and intelligent minute processing technology

The integrated system of JY-27A, JY-26 and JYL-1A codenamed “Sky Guard” is based on the experience in shooting down US F-117A stealth fighter in 1999 with a meter-wave anti-stealth radar.

JY-27A is the newest meter-wave radar much more advanced than that used 20 years ago to shoot down F-117A. It is an all-round digital array active phased array radar with agile wave beam scanning and strong task scheduling and resources management capabilities, which make it a strong multi-task and multifunction radar with much greater maneuverability and reliability in carrying out its tasks.

It adopts a series of new technology such as super resolution height measuring that is commensurate with complicate topography, continuous vertical coverage of air space and integrated anti-jamming technology. Such technologies enable it to overcome the traditional shortcomings of meter-wave radar that fails to cover low elevation, monitor airspace continuously or to measure the height of a target.

JY-26 is a UHF-waveband long-range three dimension early warning and guiding radar with duel frequency and super large aperture anti-stealth capabilities. JYL-1A is a new-generation S-waveband multifunction and multi-task radar with integrated capabilities of air defense early warning, anti-missile early warning, gun position detection and adjustment and airspace control.

In the system of YLC-8B, SLC-7 and SLC-12 radars YLC-8B is the core. It works at UHF-waveband, which due to its long wavelength can be diffracted by a stealth aircraft. It is thus able to serve as air battle command system and weapon interception system and can provide air force with integrated information of the position, distance, height and friend-or-foe nature of any target. It has strong intelligence integration and independent guiding capabilities.

SLC-7 radar in the system works at L waveband and has the advantages of high accuracy and maneuverability while SLC-12 in the system works in S waveband and is able to detect various targets such as conventional and stealth targets, drones, cruise missiles, air-to-ground missiles, static missiles and rocket artillery with high measuring accuracy and ratio of data.

The three radars supplement one another to form an anti-stealth early warning and monitoring system that can not only ensure detection of stealth targets but also guide air defense system in conducting accurate strikes.

The system provide a anti-stealth solution with complete types and wavebands for international users.

In the airshow, China also promotes its YLC-29 passive surveillance radar system that can detect a stealth warplane through its reflection of civilian FM radio signals. It may supplement the above two systems.

Some readers may wonder, since the systems are able to deal with China’s J-20 and J-31 stealth fighter jets, why China provide them for international users. To enable them to shoot down China’s stealth fighter jets?

China’s J-20 and J-31 have been developed for defending its airspace especially against the bully from US stealth warplanes.

China has no intention to attack other countries with its stealth warplanes. Selling the systems to other countries will enable not only China to recover its development costs but also other countries to resist US bully.

Summary and comment by Chan Kai Yee on Global Times’ article in Chinese titled “Experts: China’s 4th generation anti-stealth radars represent world most advanced standards”, full text in Chinese can be found at http://mil.huanqiu.com/observation/2017-06/10918602.html.


Revealed: China’s Radars Can Track America’s Stealthy F-22 Raptor


F-22. Image: Wikimedia Commons/U.S. Air Force.

Dave Majumdar February 19, 2016

Chinese media is claiming that the People’s Liberation Army has been able to track the U.S. Air Force’s Lockheed Martin F-22 Raptor stealth fighters over the East China Sea. While the Chinese report might be easily dismissed as propaganda—it is not beyond the realm of possibility. In fact—it’s very possible that China can track the Raptor. Stealth is not a cloak of invisibility, after all. Stealth technology simply delays detection and tracking.

First off, if a Raptor is carrying external fuel tanks—as it often does during “ferry missions”—it is not in a stealth configuration. Moreover, the aircraft is often fitted with a Luneburg lens device on its ventral side during peacetime operations that enhances its cross section on radar.

That being said, even combat-configured F-22s are not invisible to enemy radar, contrary to popular belief. Neither is any other tactical fighter-sized stealth aircraft with empennage surfaces such as tailfins—the F-35, PAK-FA, J-20 or J-31. That’s just basic physics.

The laws of physics essentially dictate that a tactical fighter-sized stealth aircraft must be optimized to defeat higher-frequency bands such the C, X, Ku and the top part of the S bands. There is a “step change” in a Low Observable (LO) aircraft’s signature once the frequency wavelength exceeds a certain threshold and causes a resonant effect. Typically, that resonance occurs when a feature on an aircraft—such as a tail-fin — is less than eight times the size of a particular frequency wavelength. Effectively, small stealth aircraft that do not have the size or weight allowances for two feet or more of radar absorbent material coatings on every surface are forced to make trades as to which frequency bands they are optimized for.

Therefore, a radar operating at a lower-frequency band such as parts of the S or L band—like civilian air traffic control (ATC) radars—are almost certainly able to detect and track tactical fighter-sized stealth aircraft. However, a larger stealth aircraft like the Northrop Grumman B-2 Spirit, which lacks many of the features that cause a resonance effect, is much more effective against low-frequency radars than, for example, an F-35 or F-22. Typically, however, those lower-frequency radars do not provide what Pentagon officials call a “weapons quality” track needed to guide a missile onto a target. “Even if you can see an LO [low observable] strike aircraft with ATC radar, you can’t kill it without a fire control system,” an Air Force official had told me.
That being said, Russia, China and others are developing advanced UHF and VHF band early warning radars that use even longer wavelengths in an effort to cue their other sensors and give their fighters some idea of where an adversary stealth aircraft might be coming from. But the problem with VHF and UHF band radars is that with long wavelengths come large radar resolution cells. That means that contacts are not tracked with the required level of fidelity to guide a weapon onto a target. As one U.S. Navy officer rhetorically asked, “Does the mission require a cloaking device or is it OK if the threat sees it but can’t do anything about it?”

Traditionally, guiding weapons with low frequency radars has been limited by two factors. One factor is the width of the radar beam, while the second is the width of the radar pulse—but both limitations can be overcome with signal processing. Phased array radars—particularly active electronically scanned arrays (AESA)—solve the problem of directional or azimuth resolution because they can steer their radar beams electronically. Moreover, AESA radars can generate multiple beams and can shape those beams for width, sweep rate and other characteristics. Indeed, some industry experts suggested that a combination of high-speed data-links and low-frequency phased-array radars could generate a weapons quality track.

The U.S. Navy and Lockheed may have already solved the problem. The service openly talks about the E-2D’s role as the central node of its NIFC-CA battle network to defeat enemy air and missile threats. Rear Adm. Mike Manazir, the Navy’s director of air warfare, described the concept in detail at the U.S. Naval Institute just before Christmas in 2013.

Under the NIFC-CA ‘From the Air’ (FTA) construct, the APY-9 radar would act as a sensor to cue Raytheon AIM-120 AMRAAM air-to-air missiles for Boeing F/A-18E/F Super Hornets fighters via the Link-16 datalink. Moreover, the APY-9 would also act as a sensor to guide Raytheon Standard SM-6 missiles launched from Aegis cruisers and destroyers against targets located beyond the ships’ SPY-1 radars’ horizon via the Cooperative Engagement Capability datalink under the NIFC-CA ‘From the Sea’ (FTS) construct. In fact, the Navy has demonstrated live-fire NIFC-CA missile shots using the E-2D’s radar to guide SM-6 missiles against over-the-horizon shots—which by definition means the APY-9 is generating a weapons quality track.

That effectively means that stealthy tactical aircraft must operate alongside electronic attack platforms the like Boeing EA-18G Growler. It is also why the Pentagon has been shoring up American investments in electronic and cyber warfare. As one Air Force official explained, stealth and electronic attack always have a synergistic relationship because detection is about the signal-to-noise ratio. Low observables reduce the signal, while electronic attack increases the noise. “Any big picture plan, looking forward, to deal with emerging A2/AD threats will address both sides of that equation,” he said.

Dave Majumdar is the defense editor for the National Interest. You can follow him on Twitter: @davemajumdar.

Source: National Interest “Revealed: China’s Radars Can Track America’s Stealthy F-22 Raptor”

Note: This is National Interest’s article I post here for readers’ information. It does not mean that I agree or disagree with the article’s views.


China offers anti-stealth radars for export


Chinese anti-stealth radars on display at the Airshow China 2016 in Zhuhai. From left to right are the JY-27A, YLC-8B, and SLC-7. Source: Via dy.163.com

Chinese anti-stealth radars on display at the Airshow China 2016 in Zhuhai. From left to right are the JY-27A, YLC-8B, and SLC-7. Source: Via dy.163.com

Andrew Tate, London – IHS Jane’s Defence Weekly

11 November 2016

China’s principal radar manufacturer, the China Electronics Technology Group Corporation (CETC), exhibited at Airshow China 2016 a number of air defence radars it claims can detect low-observable aircraft such as the Lockheed Martin F-22 Raptor and F-35 Lightning II fighters.

Chinese news media reported that these radars are being marketed for export to any country with a requirement to counter such stealth capabilities.

While the 2016 air show in Zhuhai is not the first venue CETC has exhibited such hardware at, the equipment on display reflects in part the claim made by some Chinese commentators that China has become the world leader in radars capable of detecting stealth aircraft.

Although exhibited in public, data on the performance characteristics to back up the cutting-edge claims is less forthcoming. Anti-stealth radars typically operate at frequencies below 1GHz, because low-observable aircraft are designed to minimise their cross section to radars operating within radio spectrum covered by the IEEE S, C, and X bands (broadly 2-12 GHz).

At lower frequencies, radar reflections increase as the wavelength becomes closer to the physical size of parts of the aircraft and also resonances may be induced in parts of the airframe by the radar pulse, increasing the aircraft’s susceptibility to detection and tracking.

The Nanjing Research Institute of Electronic Technology (NRIET) is at the forefront of CETC’s programme and produced two of the units on display at the Zhuhai air show, the YLC-8B and SLC-7.

While the YLC-8B, a 3-D surveillance radar that operates in the IEEE UHF band (300 Mhz-1 GHz), had already been exhibited at Zhuhai in 2014, the SLC-7 made its debut at the show this year.

The SLC-7 operates in the IEEE L-band (1-2 GHz). According to NRIET, the radar electronically scans the phased array in azimuth and elevation and also scans mechanically in azimuth.

Source: IHS Jane’s 360 “China offers anti-stealth radars for export”

Note: This is IHS Jane’s 360’s article I post here for readers’ information. It does not mean that I agree or disagree with the article’s views.


China Shows Off Its Large Anti-stealth Radars in Zhuhai Airshow


One version of China's large anti-stealth radar on display in Zhuhai Airshow

One version of China’s large anti-stealth radar on display in Zhuhai Airshow

The radar viewed from another angle.

The radar viewed from another angle.

Another version of China's large anti-stealth radar on display in Zhuhai Airshow

Another version of China’s large anti-stealth radar on display in Zhuhai Airshow

A third version of China's large anti-stealth radar on display in Zhuhai Airshow

A third version of China’s large anti-stealth radar on display in Zhuhai Airshow

The above are mil.huanqiu.com’s photos of China’s large anti-stealth radars that can satisfactorily detect and track stealth warplanes.

Source: mil.huanqiu.com “Large anti-stealth radars on display in Zhuhai” (summary by Chan Kai Yee based on the report in Chinese)


China’s Radar Detects, Accurately Positions, Guides Hitting Stealth Fighters


The four new-type radars displayed by CEC Electronics at the 10th China International National Defense Electronics Exhibition

The four new-type radars displayed by CEC Electronics at the 10th China International National Defense Electronics Exhibition

China’s official military forum mil.huanqiu.com says in its report on the 10th China International National Defense Electronics Exhibition that was held in Beijing from 11 to 13 July that China’s anti-stealth radar roused great concerns among foreigners.

In the above picture, there are four advanced new radars displayed by CEC China Electronics at the exhibition.

The most interesting is the JL3D-91B meter-wave three coordinates radar in the picture below. It can satisfactorily detect fourth-generation fighters and conventional targets in the air, obtain the information about their position, distance and height with high resolution. It alone is able to be responsible for the high altitude, medium- and long-range air battle direction and guidance and long-range reconnaissance for a designated area.

JL3D-91B meter-wave three coordinates radar

JL3D-91B meter-wave three coordinates radar


China’s New Anti-stealth Radar Able to Detect All Metal Weapons


China's JY-26 anti-stealth meter waveband radar

China’s JY-26 anti-stealth meter waveband radar

China's anti-stealth resonance radar able to detect all metal weapons

China’s anti-stealth resonance radar able to detect all metal weapons

In my post “US Panicking at China’s Anti-stealth Radars Blaming China for Espionage” on December 11, 2014, I described China’s JY-26 anti-stealth radar, which US military expert Richard Fisher claimed in his article that it was but a copy of US Lockheed Martin’s 3DELRR Radar.

I said, “However, UK radar expert John Wise opposes Fisher’s view. He said that the Lockheed 3DELRR was a ‘G-band (5.4GHz) radar and has nothing whatsoever in common with the JY-26, other than shape.’ If JY-26 really has anti-stealth aircraft capability, it would need to operate down the bottom end of the UHF band (250-350MHz).”

True enough, Chinese website mil.news.sina.com.cn says in its report yesterday, JY-26 works in meter waveband. It can detect stealth warplanes as the coating of the stealth warplanes now can avoid being detected by radar of millimeter to less than meter waveband. However, if new coating has been invented to avoid being detected by meter waveband radar, JY-26 will be useless. That is for the future.

However, to have better detection capabilities, China has developed a unique new anti-stealth radar that can detect all metal weapons. It is China’s new resonance radar.

The radar was displayed in a back row of Zhuhai Air Show without rousing any people’s attention, but Iranian delegates to the show found it and discussed with representatives of the Chinese producer. We do not know the results of their discussions, but we do know that when the US sent a team of SEAL on a fast boat for a secret mission to Iran, it was soon discovered. The team escaped through diving but its fast boat was captured by Iran. There is speculation that the metal weapons of team were discovered by the resonance radar Iran imported from China.

Source: mil.news.sina.com.cn “Depth Column: China has developed a new anti-stealth radar able to detect all metal weapons” (summary by Chan Kai Yee based on the report in Chinese)


China Building Anti-stealth Radar on Cuarteron Artificial Island


A Jan. 24, 2016 image of Cuarteron Reef in the South China Sea with what is likely a high frequency radar array. CSIS Asian Maritime Transparency Initiative, DigitalGlobe Image used with permission.

A Jan. 24, 2016 image of Cuarteron Reef in the South China Sea with what is likely a high frequency radar array. CSIS Asian Maritime Transparency Initiative, DigitalGlobe Image used with permission.

A Jan. 24, 2016 image of Cuarteron Reef in the South China Sea with what is likely a high frequency radar array. CSIS, DigitalGlobe Image used with permission.

Another  Jan. 24, 2016 image of Cuarteron Reef in the South China Sea with what is likely a high frequency radar array. CSIS, DigitalGlobe Image used with permission.

USNI News says in its report “New Possible Chinese Radar Installation on South China Sea Artificial Island Could Put U.S., Allied Stealth Aircraft at Risk” today that according to satellite image, “New Possible Chinese Radar Installation on South China Sea Artificial Island Could Put U.S., Allied Stealth Aircraft at Risk.”

The above satellite images show the radars and other facilities China is building on the artificial island China has built on Cuarteron Reef.

USNI News says that US and its allies’ stealth warplanes may be in danger as “A possible HF array on Cuarteron could feed what its detects back to mainland China through data links to provide information to radars capable of better targeting stealth aircraft less real estate to scan and then route that data to anti-air warfare missile systems.”

The following is the full text of USNI News’ report:

New Possible Chinese Radar Installation on South China Sea Artificial Island Could Put U.S., Allied Stealth Aircraft at Risk
By: Sam LaGrone February 22, 2016 3:19 PM • Updated: February 22, 2016

A possible new Chinese radar installation in the South China Sea could put American and allied stealth aircraft at risk as part of a wider detection network similar to U.S. efforts to find Russian bombers in the Cold War.

Late January satellite imagery from the Center for Strategic and International Studies and DigitalGlobe show the installation of what’s likely a high frequency radar installation the Chinese disputed holding of Cuarteron Reef near the Philippines.

The imagery from DigitalGlobe shows a field on the island with 65 foot-tall poles in a field on reclaimed land on the reef – China’s southern most holding in the region – that are similar to other maritime HF radars, Greg Poling, head of the center’s Asian Maritime Transparency Initiative told USNI News on Monday.

“Why would you have 20-meter poles spread across this features if it’s not high frequency radar? ” Poling said.
“Maybe a giant tarp?”

It’s unclear from the imagery if the site on Cuarteron is operational and inquires left with the Department of Defense by USNI News on Monday were not immediately answered. The Washington Post first reported the installation early Monday afternoon

Bryan Clark, a maritime analyst at the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments (CSBA), said that while a high frequency radar on the island could have some law enforcement value – like similar radars the U.S. uses to detect drug runners in the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean — it’s likely an HF radar on Cuarteron has a secondary military use to detect stealth aircraft.

Similar U.S. and Russian radars can detect surface targets at ranges well over the horizon – 80 to 200 miles. However Chinese and Russian versions could also notice the presence of low observable aircraft, Clark said.

“If I’m China, this is what I want to install so I can monitor maritime and aviation contacts,” he said.

“It’s got a nice dual use. It can find other aircraft that would be hard to find with traditional early warning radar frequencies.”

China has already installed similar radars on its coastline that are used to detect the presence of stealth aircraft.

A possible HF array on Cuarteron could feed what its detects back to mainland China through data links to provide information to radars capable of better targeting stealth aircraft less real estate to scan and then route that data to anti-air warfare missile systems.

The setup “gives you some indications and warning that there are stealth aircraft in the area,” Clark said.

In particular, U.S. stealth aircraft – like the Northrop Grumman B-2 Spirit bomber and Lockheed Martin’s F-22 Raptor and F-35 Lighting II Joint Strike Fighter – are optimized against the high end of the radar spectrum.

Higher frequency radars – on their own — can tell when a low observable or stealth aircraft is in its range but do not have the fidelity to lock weapons. However — as reported by USNI News in 2014 — Russia and China both are perfecting lower band radar that could successfully target low observable aircraft working in conjunction with an HF early warning system. The radars could also provide information to Chinese fighters a general idea where to intercept an adversary.

In addition to the U.S., Australia and Japan are in the process of acquiring F-35s.

The U.S. used a similar idea when it create the Distant Early Warning line to detect Russian bombers starting in the late 1950s.

“It’s the same idea as the DEW Line,” Clark said of an HF array on Cuarteron.
“You could look at this as extending the range of their early warning radars.”

Chris Carlson, a retired U.S. Navy captain and analyst told USNI News that the installation on Cuarteron was much smaller than other similar mainland arrays and its unclear how well the secondary function of the radars would work at the size seen in the images released on Monday.

Additionally, given the location near the Philippines, the alleged HF installation on Cuarteron could also monitor U.S. aircraft movements in the country at long range — all in a package with which China can claim for civilian law enforcement uses, Clark said.

“They can say this is for fishery enforcement and maritime domain awareness and that’s what China will probably claim,” he said.

Beijing has repeatedly said the new installations on the reef, also home to a lighthouse completed in October, are to provide “better public services and goods for the international community,” according to a Monday press briefing with Ministry of Foreign Affairs spokeswoman Hua Chunying.

Last week satellite imagery of Woody Island in the Paracel chain near Vietnam revealed more than 30 mobile anti-air warfare missiles had been placed on the island – raising questions on China’s peaceful intent in the region.

Beijing implicitly defended the move of the HQ-9 system to Woody Island – confirmed last week by Foreign Minister Wang Yi.

“The Chinese side is entitled to safeguard its territorial sovereignty and maritime rights and interests,” Hua said later in her Monday briefing.

“China’s deployment of limited defense facilities on its own territory is its exercise of self-defense right to which a sovereign state is entitled under international law. It has nothing to do with militarization. It is something that comes naturally, and is completely justified and lawful. The U.S. should view that correctly instead of making an issue of that with deliberate sensationalization [sic].”

Source: USNI News “New Possible Chinese Radar Installation on South China Sea Artificial Island Could Put U.S., Allied Stealth Aircraft at Risk”


US Panicking at China’s Anti-stealth Radars Blaming China for Espionage


US Lockheed Martin's 3DELRR radar

US Lockheed Martin’s 3DELRR radar

China's JY-26 anti-stealth radar

China’s JY-26 anti-stealth radar

JY-27A anti-stealth radar

JY-27A anti-stealth radar

Reuters says in its report on December 9 that Yu Long, “A former Connecticut resident and Chinese citizen who allegedly worked on the F135 engine was charged with trying to take sensitive documents about military technology to China, according to a criminal complaint unsealed on Tuesday.”

Yu is certainly not a Chinese professional spy as he had already raised US security authority’s suspicion after he was “stopped at John F. Kennedy International Airport in August and found to have $10,000 in undeclared cash, registration documents for a new Chinese corporation and an application to work for a state-controlled aviation research center in China that highlighted Yu Long’s work experience on the engines.”

If he had been a professional spy, he would certainly have known that “U.S. defense officials have sounded the alarm in recent years about increased efforts by China, Russia and other countries to gain access to U.S. military technologies.” Therefore, he would certainly have avoided bringing suspicious documents with him when he traveled to China after he had raised suspicion in August.

However, the US seems to believe that only the US is able to develop most advanced weapons while other countries have no choice but to steal or copy US weapons.

As a result, when the US learnt from China’s Zhuhai airshow that China has developed a radar that is able to detect and track stealth aircrafts, its first response is disbelief.

Bill Sweetman, an US aerospace and defense journalist specializing in the development and use of high-tech weapons and senior international defense editor of Aviation Week & Space Technology, says in is article on China’s such radar on December 2, “a senior retired U.S. Air Force commander pooh-poohed counterstealth efforts. I don’t know where such confidence originates, because nothing like the JH-27A and its companion radars exists in the West, and so we know little of how they work.”

Mr. Sweetman himself says in his article, “if ‘Chinese officials are telling the truth’, is ‘the first of its type in service anywhere’ ‘to track stealthy targets’.” It expressed his suspicion whether Chin was indeed capable of developing such a radar though this blogger had already described three Chinese radars capable of detecting and tracking stealth aircrafts that China showcased in an exhibition in May.

China’s qianzhan.com says in its report today that the website of US Defense News published US military expert Richard Fisher’s article claiming that China’s JY-26 anti-stealth radar is but a copy of US Lockheed Martin’s 3DELRR Radar.

However, UK radar expert John Wise opposes Fisher’s view. He said that the Lockheed 3DELRR was a “G-band (5.4GHz) radar and has nothing whatsoever in common with the JY-26, other than shape.” If JY-26 really has anti-stealth aircraft capability, it would need to operate down the bottom end of the UHF band (250-350MHz).

From the above photos of US 3DELRR and JY-26 radars we see that they are similar in shape, but Defense News another article says, according to Wise, “common radar configurations are not necessarily evidence of espionage because similar engineering objectives could lead to similar solutions.

Obviously, Lockheed 3DELRR radar cannot detect or track stealth aircraft. Otherwise, US media would not have regarded China’s JH-27A radar as the first radar in the world with such capability.

If China relies on espionage for its radar’s capability in detecting and tracking stealth aircraft, what China has stolen from the US in its another anti-stealth aircraft rada JH-27A? Is there anything similar between the two radars in their photos above?

If the US rest at ease in believing it remains the most advanced and what it needs to do is but to prevent others from stealing from it while other countries are working hard to invent more advanced weapons on their own. A decade later, the US will find itself lagging far behind China.

I hope that the US will conduct a revolutionary change in its military strategy so that it may remain one of the most militarily advanced in the world. After all, the US has a much larger military budget than China.

Source: Reuters “Man charged with trying to take U.S. military documents to China”

Source: the website of US Defense News “How China Will Track and Kill America’s Newest Stealth Jets” and “China’s Anti-Stealth Radar Comes to Fruition”

Source: qianzhan.com “PLA’s one capability to beat all stealth aircrafts in the world: US makes a false charge of China plagiarizeing” (summary by Chan Kai Yee based on the report in Chinese)


China Able to Track and Kill US Stealth Aircrafts


JY-27A anti-stealth radar

JY-27A anti-stealth radar

In his post “Chinese Radar Detects, Locks on F-22, Causes US Withdrawal of F-22s from Japan” on April 2, 2014, this blogger quotes an Italian media’s report that the major reason for F-22’s withdrawal from Japan to Guam was that an F-22 was discovered and locked on by China’s radar.

As the Italian media is not an authority of military news, people perhaps ignored that.

However, on May 11, in his post “China Showcases Advanced Radars Able to Detect Stealth Aircrafts”, this blogger described the three radars that are capable of detecting stealth aircrafts that China showcased in its 2014 9th China International Defense Electronics Exhibition opened on May 8 at China International Exhibition Centre (the old exhibition hall at Jingan Village), Beijing: JY-50 Passive Radar for Detecting and Tracking Stealth Aircrafts; JYL-1A Radar to Detect and Track with High Precision Stealth Aircrafts and Tactical Ballistic Missiles and JY-27A Air Surveillance & Guidance Radar to Detect, Track Stealth Aircrafts and Missiles.

Details of the three radars are given in my book Space Era Strategy: The Way China Beats The U.S.

However, Pentagon either is ignorant of the exhibition or keeps secret of the information in order not to cause panic among American people.

As a result, even Bill Sweetman, an American aerospace and defense journalist specializing in the development and use of high-tech weapons and senior international defense editor of Aviation Week & Space Technology was ignorant of Chinese radars’ capabilities until he learnt about such a radar when it was displayed in China’s Zhuhai airshow in November.

In Sweetman’s article on December 2 titled “How China Will Track—and Kill—America’s Newest Stealth Jets”, he says that the People’s Liberation Army has a gigantic JH-27A VHF active electronically scanned array radar, which if “Chinese officials are telling the truth”, is “the first of its type in service anywhere” “to track stealthy targets”.

If he had got the intelligence from the exhibition in May where three radars able to track stealthy targets, he would not have displayed his ignorance by saying that JH-21A had been the first such radar in the world and suspected that Chinese officials might not be telling the truth.

There is no need for Chinese officials no to tell the truth in its exhibition in May, which though international in name, was mainly visited by Chinese.

The following is the full text of Sweetman’s article:

How China Will Track—and Kill—America’s Newest Stealth Jets

A gang of advanced missiles and a bleeding-edge radar unveiled at a Chinese air show could mean big trouble for the Pentagon’s best fighters.

Once, no magic act was complete without the magician’s revealingly dressed assistant. Her job was not merely to be sawn in half but to dominate the mostly male audience’s attention at moments when a focus on the whereabouts of the rabbit might blow the gaff.

That was a useful lesson to bear in mind at last month’s Zhuhai air show—China’s only domestic air and defense trade show, held once every other year. (Sweetman is obviously ignorant of the biannual China International Defense Electronics Exhibition—this blogger)

If anything at Zhuhai was wearing fishnets and high heels, it was the Shenyang FC-31 stealth fighter, which resembles a twin-engine version of America’s newest stealth jet, the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter. But the real tricks lay in Beijing’s growing family of advanced missiles and radars.

The FC-31 prototype was hidden except when it was flying, and not much detail was available. But the display was notable for the eruptions of smoke from the engines, most likely Russian RD-93s.

That is important, because until China builds its own fighter engines it cannot build stealth fighters without approval from Vladimir Putin’s desk. That includes the Chengdu J-10B, China’s most modern, in-production fighter, or its bootleg versions of Russia’s Sukhoi Flanker fighter family.

China says it’s working on indigenous fighter and trainer engines, but the samples on show were exactly the same as those seen two years ago.

What was new and important on the Chinese military’s outdoor display line at Zhuhai was a mix of mature and new technology. And by “mature” I mean the 1950s-design Xian H-6M bomber, with something suspiciously like a World War II Norden bombsight visible through the windows of the bombardier station. But the bomber was surrounded by guided weapons, some seen for the first time in public. The same went for the somewhat more modern JH-7 light bomber.

Zhuhai was full of new missile hardware, from the 3 1/2-ton CX-1 ramjet-powered anti-ship and land-attack missile down to the QW-19 manportable air-defense system. (China’s military believes in these small air-defense missiles, both in their classic standalone form and integrated into small mobile systems.)

Not many of those missiles were individually surprising. The CX-1 is different in small details from the Russian-Indian BrahMos but very similar in specifications. Two-stage short-range surface-to-air missiles borrow the concept invented for Russia’s KBM Tunguska and Pantsyr systems, and so on.

What is impressive, however, is how many of the new Chinese missiles there are, and how they fit together.

One visible trend is the re-use of components to meet different mission needs. Since the CM-400AKG air-to-surface missile appeared at 2012’s edition of the Zhuhai show, it has gathered a lot of attention as a high-supersonic anti-ship weapon. This year, the exhibit strongly suggested that it shares its solid rocket motor and warhead with the surface-to-surface SY400 ballistic missile, and a passive radar seeker with the new B611MR semi-ballistic anti-radiation missile. The B611MR, in turn, has a common motor and controls to the 175-mile-range M20 GPS/inertially guided missile—China’s equivalent to Russia’s Iskander—and both are intended to use the same mobile launcher and command-and-control system as the CX-1. Lots of interchangeable parts: That is how China can roll out so many missile types so quickly.

What is impressive is how many of the new Chinese missiles there are, and how they fit together.

A “system of systems” approach was evident in the biggest thinly coded message at Zhuhai. That was the People’s Liberation Army’s outdoor lineup of air-defense hardware, centered on the gigantic JH-27A VHF active electronically scanned array radar—the first of its type in service anywhere, if Chinese officials are telling the truth. Such radars are designed to track stealthy targets. The radar’s antenna, almost 100 feet tall, towered over the rest of the exhibits. Just to the left of it were smaller Aesas, one operating in UHF and the other in the centimetric S-band: that is, complementary sensors with progressively higher resolution, cued by the VHF radar to track stealthy targets, accurately enough to engage them with missiles.

At a conference in London the following week, a senior retired U.S. Air Force commander pooh-poohed counterstealth efforts. I don’t know where such confidence originates, because nothing like the JH-27A and its companion radars exists in the West, and so we know little of how they work.

Further down the line were three vehicles—a radar/command vehicle, a short-to-medium-range LY-60D/HQ-6D surface-to-air missile, and a Norinco LD-2000 seven-barrel 30-mm gun. Like some gun systems used by the West, the LD-2000 is basically a truck-mobile version of a gun system carried by ships to shoot down incoming missiles. But the West uses those systems to defend forward operating bases in Iraq and Afghanistan from rockets and mortars, and China doesn’t need the LD-2000 for that.

Instead, the PLA has made the gun part of a point-defense system against both attacking aircraft and weapons, such as precision-guided munitions. The system is truck-mounted and road-mobile, as are the big and conspicuous radars that stood next to it on display. It is most likely intended to protect those high-value relocatable assets from even a well-executed destruction of enemy air-defense operation. Will it be 100 percent effective? No. Does it make China’s air defenses much harder to kill? Assuredly.

Stealth fighters get the attention even though they smoke like Humphrey Bogart, but there is a lot of PLA money going into missiles and reconnaissance systems that can hold naval and other forces—the assets that the Chinese see as their primary threats—at risk from far beyond the horizon, and radars that are designed to detect, track. and target stealth aircraft. That’s the rabbit, and we take our eyes off it at our peril.

Source: The Daily Beast.com “How China Will Track—and Kill—America’s Newest Stealth Jets”

Related posts at tiananmenstremendousachievements.wordpress.com:

  • China’s Capabilities to Detect, Track F-22 Stealth Fighter dated October 8, 2014
  • China Showcases Advanced Radars Able to Detect Stealth Aircrafts dated May 12, 2014
  • Chinese Radar Detects, Locks on F-22, Causes US Withdrawal of F-22s from Japan dated April 2, 2014

China’s Capabilities to Detect, Track F-22 Stealth Fighter


In an interview in early 2013 soon after China’s radar expert Wang Xiaomo won China’s top science and technology prize, Wang told the reporter his ambition to develop an early warning aircraft able to detect America’s F-22 stealth fighter jet.

There has so far been no news whether Wang has achieved that, but in April 2014, an Italian media reported that an F-22 was detected and locked on by Chinese radar.

Later in May 2014, China showcased three anti-stealth radars at 2014 9th China International Defense Electronics Exhibition in Beijing on May 8-10, 2014: JY-50, JYL-1A and JY-27A.

Among them, JY-50 and JYL-1A are mobile ones, but according to their photos, they are too big to be installed on an AEW&C aircraft. JY-27A is a fixed one much bigger with longer range. There are detailed descriptions of the detection and tracking and the three anti-stealth radars in Chapter 12 of my book Space Era Strategy: The Way China Beats The U.S.

However, it is still unknown whether Wang Xiaomo has developed an anti-stealth radar small enough to be installed on an early warning aircraft.

However long the range of JY-27A, it can only tell Chinese fighter jets the location of F-22s so as to avoid being hit by them. Only when such a radar is small enough to be installed in an AEW&C aircraft can the AEW&C launch or guide the missiles from other aircrafts or warships to hit down F-22s. That will be of vital importance. F-22 is developed to control the sky. In a battle, no enemy aircrafts will be able to fly if the sky is patrolled by 20 F-22s.

China’s J-20 stealth fighter jet is precisely developed to counter F-22 and grab from it the control of sky. However, it takes years to make J-20 good enough for that job. The development of AEW&C with ability to detect and track F-22 will probably be a shortcut to make the US lose air supremacy before J-20 is ready.

China is indeed making great efforts for that. On September 30, Voice of Russia said that according to news confirmed by China’s official media, China has developed and deployed in quite a few areas DWL-002 passive radar for detecting and tracking stealth fighter jets and drones. Voice of Russia says that DWL-002 is an improved version of JY-27A. According to the photo of the radar, its antenna is much smaller than JY-27A. It indicates China’s great efforts in developing anti-stealth radar.

I have mentioned in my book that China is carrying out an arms race with the US and has surpassed or surpassing the US in the development of quite a few key weapons. It’s time for the US to replace its outdated strategy with a strategy of our space era and amend its weapon development plan to meet China’s challenge.

As for details of China’s DWL-002 anti-stealth radar, I hereby provide the following full text of US defense news website’s report on it:

Does China Tout Its Anti-stealth Radars
By WENDELL MINNICK
Oct. 4, 2014 – 03:45AM

TAIPEI — America’s most advanced stealth fighter poses a great risk to China’s air defense network — and the military is going to great lengths to learn how to shoot one down.

China claims it has a new passive detection “radar” capable of identifying stealth aircraft, including the more advanced F-22 Raptor fighter based at Andersen Air Force Base on Guam.

The claims appeared in the last week of September in Chinese-language media outlets stating that the F-22 and Europe’s Neuron unmanned combat aerial vehicle are “obsolete” against China’s new DWL002 passive detection system.

Marketed by Beijing-based CETC International, the DWL002 passive detection system was displayed during the 9th China International Defense Electronics Exhibition in Beijing in May. It comprises one master reconnaissance station and two slave stations. The systems can be expanded to four stations and outfitted on trucks. The DWL002 has a detection range of 400 kilometers for fighter aircraft and 600 kilometers for airborne early warning and control aircraft, such as the US E-3 Sentry and E-2 Hawkeye.

At 400 to 600 kilometers, the DWL002 can cover all of Taiwan and the disputed Senkaku Islands in the East China Sea, but is not within range of US military bases on Okinawa. Nor can it reach the Philippines.

“Its range is limited by its parameter set and is most unlikely to achieve anywhere near 500 kilometers unless it is sited on a 10,000-foot mountain targeting aircraft at 30,000 feet,” said John Wise, UK-based radar analyst.

Despite the range problem, the Chinese media says the system provides a target capacity of 100 batches and a range of detectable signal types including pulse, frequency agility, pulse duration, tactical air navigation system, distance measuring equipment, jitter/stagger radar, and identification friend or foe.

Passive detection systems like DWL002 and YLC20 do pose a threat to low-observable aircraft, said Richard Fisher, a senior fellow with the US-based International Assessment and Strategy Center. “Passive systems like these simply listens for any electronic emission, which for the increasingly ‘networked’ style of American combat operations, ensures there will be plenty of signals to classify and locate targets.”

Fisher said one response would be to use optical data transmission systems where possible, but that would affect strategic flexibility as line-of-sight would have to be maintained.

The DWL002 is the product of inspiration from two other passive detection systems, said Vasiliy Kashin, a China military specialist at the Moscow-based Centre for Analysis of Strategies and Technologies. In 2004, the US blocked the sale of the Czech VERA-E passive detection systems to China, but the “Chinese had an opportunity to closely inspect the systems.” When China could not buy the VERA-E, Kashin said, they bought Ukrainian Kolchuga passive surveillance system.

“As I understand, DWL002 is a development of the YLC20 radar, which, in turn, was mainly based on the VERA-E,” Kashin said. The Chinese YLC20 is a passive direction-finding and locating system with a 600-kilometer range.

Americans may have forgotten China’s intimacy with US stealth aircraft and the driving force to obtain anti-stealth technology. During the May 1999 bombing campaign against Yugoslavia, a US B-2 stealth bomber dropped five bombs on the Chinese Embassy in Belgrade in May. In March, an F-117 stealth fighter was shot down during the war. Unconfirmed media reports suggest China was given part of the fuselage to study.

In 2011, satellite imagery available on Google Earth revealed a full-scale mock-up of the then-retired F-117 at the Luoyang Optoelectro Technology Development Center (LOEC) in Henan Province. A former US military attaché based in Beijing during the 1990s said the mock-up is not a surprise. LOEC also has a mock-up of the B-2, F-35 and F-22, he said.

Espionage has played an important part in China’s attempt to learn more about US stealth aircraft. In June, Su Bin, a Chinese citizen and the head of China-based Lode-Technology, was detained by Canadian authorities due to US government allegations that he provided China with classified data on the F-22 and F-35 stealth fighters.

Source: Chan Kai Yee Space Era Strategy: The Way China Beats The U.S.

Source: defensenews.com “Does China Tout Its Anti-stealth Radars”