China’s Poor Image in Africa due to Chinese People’s, Firms’ Behaviors


China's reputation is being tarnished across continent by the behaviour of some Chinese nationals and companies, ambassador to Tanzania Lu Youqing says.

China’s reputation is being tarnished across continent by the behaviour of some Chinese nationals and companies, ambassador to Tanzania Lu Youqing says.

It’s perhaps coincidence, but Reuters’ report on China’s Xi Jinping not making global impact comes on the same day when Hong Kong newspapers SCMP and Ta Kung Pao report on China’s poor image in Africa due to Chinese people and companies’ behaviors there.

Ta Kung Pao says in its report as an increasing number of Chinese enterprises have entered Africa, there have been frequent complaints about the behaviors of Chinese people and companies there.

According to Lu Youqing, Chinese ambassador to Tanzania, there are two common problems among the Chinese people and companies: fierce infighting resulting in vicious competition among Chinese companies and failure to conform to local laws, practices and customs.

SCMP says in its report “He (Lu) said the embassy became tense every time Tanzania announced another ivory seizure.” It quotes Lu as saying, “[Some Chinese here] knowingly engaged in illegal activities.”

“Lu said he received complaints from local officials and police about Chinese nationals who hid ivory inside the bonnets of cars and even inside the bras of female air passengers.

“He was also very concerned about shoddy roadworks carried out by Chinese contractors in neighbouring African countries.”

Ta Kung Pao says in its report that China’s poor image has been caused not only by the malpractices of companies and people there but also by the uncivilized behaviors of Chinese tourists such as graffiti at sites of cultural relics.

Reuters quotes Pew Research Center’s report that Xi Jinping “so far has failed to make a strong positive impression on global publics. Overall, ratings for Xi are more negative than positive, while at the same time many are unfamiliar with the Chinese leader.”

Since they are unfamiliar with Xi, the negative impression must have come from Chinese people’s poor behaviors abroad.

Reuters says, “More broadly, global impressions of China were on balance more favourable than unfavourable, with the country’s economic growth generally seen as a good thing in most countries surveyed’ according to Pew Research Center.”

This proves the poor image is not about China as a nation but about Chinese people. Xi, though not known much by them, has got negative rating due to the impression Chinese people have given them.

It seems that when I travel abroad, local people will have a negative view about me as I am a Chinese. I shall pretend that I were a South Korea, Japanese or Singaporean, better Singaporean as Singaporean speaks Chinese.

Source: Ta Kung Pao “Who suffers for the damage to China’s image” (summary by Chan Kai Yee based on the report in Chinese)

Source: SCMP “Bad apples in Africa: Chinese traders’ and companies’ behaviour worries envoy”

Source: Reuters “China’s Xi not making global impact, views of China positive: Pew”

Related posts:

  • UNCIVILIZED PEOPLE FROM THOUSANDS YEARS OF CIVILIZATION dated January 29, 2012
  • Chinese people, goods, construction not welcome in Africa dated July 22, 2012
  • Badly behaved Chinese tourists invade local university and are even accused of using ancient moat as a toilet in historic Thai town dated April 19, 2014

Badly behaved Chinese tourists invade local university and are even accused of using ancient moat as a toilet in historic Thai town


A top Thai university has been forced to install more security after it became an unexpected tourist hotspot for Chinese travellers, following in the footsteps of a comedy caper film.

Chiang Mai University has issued the clampdown after tourists were caught sneaking into classes, making a mess in the cafeteria and even pitching a tent by the lake on campus.

The Chinese visitors have flooded the university to follow in the footsteps of the 2012 movie ‘Lost in Thailand’ that was filmed on the campus and became the highest-grossing homegrown film ever to be released in China.

Tourism boom: More Chinese travellers than ever before are visiting Thai cities such as Chiang Mai Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/travel/article-2604972/Chinese-tourists-invade-Thai-university-accused-using-ancient-moat-toilet.html#ixzz2zHoEGEtw  Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

Tourism boom: More Chinese travellers than ever before are visiting Thai cities such as Chiang Mai
Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/travel/article-2604972/Chinese-tourists-invade-Thai-university-accused-using-ancient-moat-toilet.html#ixzz2zHoEGEtw
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Now visitors are restricted to entering through a single gate manned by Mandarin-speaking volunteers who direct Chinese tourists to a line of vehicles for guided tours.

Individual visitors are banned, and a sign at the gate requests that passports be produced by tourists.

With their economy surging, mainland Chinese have become the world’s most common world traveller, with more than 100 million expected to go abroad this year. In 2012, they overtook the Americans and Germans as the top international spenders, according to the United Nations World Tourism Organisation.

Star appeal: After being used as a location for China's highest-grossing homegrown film of all time, Chiang Mai university is experiencing disruption from visiting tourists Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/travel/article-2604972/Chinese-tourists-invade-Thai-university-accused-using-ancient-moat-toilet.html#ixzz2zHpMSP8X  Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

Star appeal: After being used as a location for China’s highest-grossing homegrown film of all time, Chiang Mai university is experiencing disruption from visiting tourists
Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/travel/article-2604972/Chinese-tourists-invade-Thai-university-accused-using-ancient-moat-toilet.html#ixzz2zHpMSP8X
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

However, Chiang Mai is one city that is not so keen on its new visitors, who are considered loud, uncouth and culturally unaware.

While the tourism industry may welcome the influx, 80 per cent of residents in Chiang Mai have said they are highly displeased with Chinese behavior.

The survey and numerous comments on Thai social media blamed Chinese for spitting, littering, cutting into lines, flouting traffic laws and allowing their children to relieve themselves in public pools.

Some restaurant owners complained of Chinese filling up doggy bags at buffets.

Displeased: A survey of Chiang Mai residents found that 80 per cent were unhappy with the behaviour of Chinese visitors Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/travel/article-2604972/Chinese-tourists-invade-Thai-university-accused-using-ancient-moat-toilet.html#ixzz2zHqoYs70  Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

Displeased: A survey of Chiang Mai residents found that 80 per cent were unhappy with the behaviour of Chinese visitors
Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/travel/article-2604972/Chinese-tourists-invade-Thai-university-accused-using-ancient-moat-toilet.html#ixzz2zHqoYs70
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

A photograph posted online has further inflamed the situation after it purported to show a Chinese person defecating into Chiang Mai’s ancient moat.

‘Unfortunately, right now, the feeling is very anti-Chinese. In order to bring out such strong feelings in Chiang Mai people, it must be really bad. Generally, Chiang Mai people are quite tolerant of foreigners,’ said Annette Kunigagon, Irish owner of the long-established Eagle Guesthouse.

But she and others point out that much of the inappropriate behavior applies to tour groups rather than individual travellers who are generally younger, better educated and more attuned to local customs.

Related posts:

  • Uncivilized people from Thousands Years of Civilization dated January 29, 2012
  • Arrogant Chinese dated February 2, 2012
  • China: Taiwan to tackle resentment caused by influx of mainland tourists dated February 16, 2012
  • Outrage after Chinese men on Air France flight take wine bottles ‘to go’ dated February 26, 2013
  • ‘I was here’ Chinese carving on ancient Egyptian wall is decried on Weibo dated May 27, 2013
  • Why are Chinese tourists so rude? dated June 5, 2013

Why are Chinese tourists so rude?


Tourists holding umbrellas visit Tiananmen Square in Beijing. Photo: Reuters

Tourists holding umbrellas visit Tiananmen Square in Beijing. Photo: Reuters

Reblog of Amy Li’s blog at SCMP on June 5

After almost every ‘rude Chinese tourist’ story, unfortunately, made SCMP.com’s top-10 list, I decided to give the question some serious thought

They are seen as pushy, loud, impolite, unruly, and they are everywhere.

And although destination countries welcome the tourism dollars the Chinese spend, they loathe the chaos and hassle some mainland tourists bring upon their cities and other tourists.

“Why can’t they just behave?” people wonder, some aloud.

I have been asking myself the same question in the past months after reporting on the uncivilised, sometimes galling behaviour of some compatriots.

It seems that every time a “rude Chinese tourist” story is published on SCMP.com, it goes straight into the site’s top 10 most read articles – one such article even managed to crawl back to the top months after it was posted. So I decided to give the question some serious thought.

I read up on the topic, talked to tourism experts and travel agents and chatted with some of these tourists who are now at the centre of public anger.

It soon dawned on me that the real question to ask is: “Why are the Chinese rude?”

Yong Chen, tourism researcher and post-doctoral fellow at Hong Kong Polytechnic University, said most “bad” tourists don’t intend to be “bad” or “tourists”, they are just being themselves – they are being Chinese.

Education makes a difference

Not every Chinese tourist is a rude one, and educated people are usually better behaved than those who have had a lower standard of education, said Chen.

This could be why middle-aged or older tourists who have been deprived of or received little education during China’s politically tumultuous times tend to act more unruly. Many of them do not speak English, and some are not fluent Putonghua speakers. Their knowledge of the destination country and its culture is often at best outdated or non-existent.

This might explain the behaviour of a “rogue” mainland couple who recently visited Hong Kong with a group. They called the police and demanded HK$3,000 yuan in compensation after being made to wait two hours for their coach. The travel agency later said the coach had broken down and accused them of “blackmailing”.

Disregard for customs and rules

Jenny Wang, a Beijing-based Maldives travel agent, said uneducated tourists usually turn a blind eye to local rules and customs.

A Chinese man who was recently vacationing at a Maldives resort flipped out after discovering that the restaurant where he wanted to eat was fully booked, Wang said. He yelled threats and slurs at Chinese staff until one member was in tears.

“You cannot reason with these kinds of people,” Wang said. “They think they can do anything with their money.”

But one thing many Chinese vacationers don’t want to do with their money is tip – a custom in some places which many have ignored, Wang said.

Though most travel agents in China would educate their clients about tipping in a foreign country ahead of their trip, most people ended up tipping very little or none.

Some are not used to the idea of tipping, and they fail to understand that staff working at the Maldives resorts, who usually earn a meagre salary, rely heavily on tips, Wang said.

This has created increasing tensions between the Chinese and their hosts. Staff would naturally prefer serving guests from countries with a tipping culture. Other staff have gone after Chinese clients and asked openly for tips, a rare thing for them to do in the past.

Lawless for a reason

Students at Ewha University in Seoul, known for its beautiful campus, have recently complained about an influx of Chinese tourists, said the school.

Apparently taking photos on campus was not enough. Some camera-toting Chinese would also stride into libraries and take photos without the permission of students, according to media reports.

“As much as we want to keep the campus open to the local community,” said a university representative, “we’d like to prioritise our students’ right to study in a quiet and safe environment.”

Ewha resolved the crisis by putting up multi-language signs advising tourists to stay clear of study areas.

Multi-language signs advising tourists to stay clear of study areas in Ewha University, Seoul

Multi-language signs advising tourists to stay clear of study areas in Ewha University, Seoul

It seems that thousands of years after Confucius admonished his students not to “impose on others what you yourself don’t desire”, the Chinese now act in quite the opposite way.

Such people, both overseas and at home, selfishly skirted rules for a reason, said Chen.

Living in China, where the rule-of-law doesn’t exist, means everyone has to look out for their own interest. It also means people have little or no respect for laws.

This is bound to happen when ordinary folk are forced to watch their laws being violated every day by their leaders, Chen said, citing the Chinese idiom, shang xing xia xiao, meaning “people in lower class follow what their leaders in the upper class do”.
How long do we have to put up with bad tourists?

China and its people are paying a price for the bad behaviour of their tourists.

A poll by the Public Opinion Programme of the University of Hong Kong recently found that the number of Hongkongers holding negative feelings towards Beijing and mainland Chinese is up by about 40 per cent since November.

Following that survey, SCMP.com conducted another online poll on Wednesday, headlined “What makes some Hongkongers dislike mainland China and its people?”

As of noon, more than 50 per cent readers blamed the negative feelings on “ill-behaved tourists”.

“The Chinese government and travel agencies should take the initiative to educate our tourists,” Chen said, urging co-operation from both authorities and private sectors.

While many argue that historically American and Japanese tourists were also criticised for their bad behaviour when they became wealthy enough and traveled abroad for the first time, Chen said the Chinese should not use this as an excuse.

In fact, the Communist Party’s Central Guidance Commission for Building Spiritual Civilisation and the China National Tourism Administration have recently issued a 128-character-long rhyme to remind tourists of behaving in a “civilised manner” on the road. The topic has also been a big hit on China’s social media, where bloggers discuss and criticise the uncivlised behaviour of their compatriots.

But many are not optimistic that the situation will change any time soon.

“Chinese tourists have a long way to go before they will be respected by the world,” said Wang.

Source: Blog at SCMP “Why are Chinese tourists so rude? SCMP offers an insight”

Related posts:
‘I was here’ Chinese carving on ancient Egyptian wall is decried on Weibo dated May 27, 2013
Uncivilized people from Thousands Years of Civilization dated January 29, 2012
Arrogant Chinese dated February 2, 2012
China: Taiwan to tackle resentment caused by influx of mainland tourists dated February 16, 2012
Outrage after Chinese men on Air France flight take wine bottles ‘to go’ dated Febriary 26, 2013


Chinese wonder why their tourists behave so badly


Chinese shoppers stand with shopping bags on a sidewalk along 5th Avenue in New York City, April 4, 2013.  Credit: Reuters/Mike Segar

Chinese shoppers stand with shopping bags on a sidewalk along 5th Avenue in New York City, April 4, 2013.
Credit: Reuters/Mike Segar

From faking marriage certificates to get honeymoon discounts in the Maldives to letting children defecate on the floor of a Taiwan airport, Chinese tourists have recently found themselves at the center of controversy and anger.

Thanks to microblogging sites in China, accounts of tourists behaving badly spread like wildfire across the country, provoking disgust, ire and soul-searching.

While in the past such reports might have been dismissed as attacks on the good nature of Chinese travelers, people in the world’s second-largest economy are starting to ask why their countrymen and women are so badly behaved.

“Objectively speaking, our tourists have relatively low-civilized characters,” said Liu Simin, researcher with the Tourism Research Centre of Chinese Academy of Social Sciences.

“Overseas travel is a new luxury, Chinese who can afford it compare with each other and want to show off,” Liu said. “Many Chinese tourists are just going abroad, and are often inexperienced and unfamiliar with overseas rules and norms.”

When a story broke recently that a 15-year-old Chinese boy had scratched his name into a 3,500-year-old temple in Egypt’s Luxor, the furor was such that questions were even asked about it at a Foreign Ministry news briefing.

“There are more and more Chinese tourists travelling to other countries in recent years,” ministry spokesman Hong Lei said on Monday.

“We hope that this tourism will improve friendship with foreign countries and we also hope that Chinese tourists will abide by local laws and regulations and behave themselves.”

Other incidents have attracted similar anger, including that of a mother who let her children defecate on the floor of Kaohsiung airport in Taiwan, just meters (feet) from a toilet. She did put newspaper down first.

Embarrassment over the behavior of some Chinese tourists has reached the highest levels of government, which has tried to project an image of a benign and cultured emerging power whose growing wealth can only benefit the world.

“TERRIBLE RACKET”

This month, Vice Premier Wang Yang admonished the “uncivilized behavior” of certain Chinese tourists, in remarks widely reported by state media and reflecting concern about how the increasingly image-conscious country is seen overseas.

“They make a terrible racket in public places, scrawl their names on tourist sites, ignore red lights when crossing the road and spit everywhere. This damages our national image and has a terrible effect,” Wang said.

The central government has reissued guidelines on its main website on what it considers acceptable behavior for tourists, including dressing properly, queuing up and not shouting.

To be sure, the influx of newly wealthy Chinese travelling around world has bought economic benefits widely welcomed in many countries, and many tourists are well-behaved and respectful.

More than 83 million Chinese tourists travelled overseas last year, and Chinese expenditure on travel abroad reached $102 billion in 2012, the highest in the world according to the U.N. World Tourism Organization.

By 2020, about 200 million Chinese are expected to take an overseas holiday every year.

Criticism of bad behavior has in the past been leveled at American, Japanese and Taiwanese tourists, when they were also enjoying new wealth and going abroad for the first time.

Eventually, experts say, the criticism will fade.

“Travelling is a learning experience for tourists,” said Wang Wanfei, a tourism professor at Zhejiang University. “They learn how to absorb local culture in the process, and get rid of their bad tourist behavior.”

Source: Reuters “Chinese wonder why their tourists behave so badly”

Related posts:
Uncivilized people from Thousands Years of Civilization dated January 29, 2012
Arrogant Chinese dated February 2, 2012
China: Taiwan to tackle resentment caused by influx of mainland tourists dated February 16, 2012
Outrage after Chinese men on Air France flight take wine bottles ‘to go’ dated Febriary 26, 2013
China: ‘I was here’ Chinese carving on ancient Egyptian wall is decried on Weibo dated May 27, 2013 Thailand shocked by ‘rude’ Chinese tourists dated May 29, 2013


Thailand shocked by ‘rude’ Chinese tourists


Children at a snack stand in a Chiang Mai market. Photo: Amy Li/SCMP

Children at a snack stand in a Chiang Mai market. Photo: Amy Li/SCMP

Reblog of Amy Li’s blog at SCMP

The successful, low-budget Chinese comedy Lost in Thailand has lured tens of thousands of Chinese tourists to Chiang Mai, but they left locals in Thailand’s historic and culturally rich northern city complaining.

After seeing a record number of Chinese tourists over the Lunar New Year holiday, some locals described what they experienced as “cultural clashes”, others simply found the visitors’ behaviour disturbing and rude.

In a Letter to Editor published in Thailand’s English daily The Nation, Lamphun resident Vint Chavala wrote:

[Chinese tourists] tend to drive speedily on the wrong side of the road, and often go against traffic on one-way streets. Chinese tourists also often stop in the middle of busy intersections – just to argue among themselves about directions. Some hotel and guesthouse operators are turning them away because they say Chinese tourists often rent a room for two, but stay overnight in a group of four or five. They also deplore their tendencies to litter and hang their clothing on the balcony railing.

Chavala then went on to urge the Thai government to work with the Chinese consulate to better educate its tourists so Thailand will “thrive” instead of “suffer” from Chinese tourism.

On social network sites and local forums, locals posted more evidence of what they say are offensive acts by the Chinese:
1. A tendency to not flush the toilet.
2. Flouting traffic laws when driving, riding a bicycle, or parking their car.
3. Being loud – even in five-star hotels.
4. Littering, spitting, queue-jumping.
5. Allowing children to defecate in public pools.
6. Terrible English-language skills that lead to difficulties in communication.

Even Chinese people living in Chiang Mai said they found the behaviour of their fellow countrymen shocking and embarrassing.

“In the past I’ve always told people with pride that I am Chinese. I will be reluctant to do that in the future,” wrote one local.

“Please stop bringing shame to our people,” wrote another.

Still, more Chinese tourists are bound to visit. The Tourism Authority of Thailand expected more than 1.5 million Chinese to visit by 2014.

Why the increase in visitors? When Chavala asked a Chinese tourist why he came to Chiang Mai, the man in his 30s “stabbed a thumb to his chest and said ‘I am rich’.”

Source: SCMP “Chiang Mai locals shocked by ‘rude’ Chinese tourists”

Related posts:
Uncivilized people from Thousands Years of Civilization dated January 29, 2012
Arrogant Chinese dated February 2, 2012
China: Taiwan to tackle resentment caused by influx of mainland tourists dated February 16, 2012
Outrage after Chinese men on Air France flight take wine bottles ‘to go’ dated Febriary 26, 2013
China: ‘I was here’ Chinese carving on ancient Egyptian wall is decried on Weibo dated May 27, 2013


Nanjing teenager exposed as perpetrator of Temple of Luxor graffiti attack


Graffiti reading 'Ding Jinhao was here' lies scratched into a piece of Egyptian artwork in the 3,500-year-old Temple of Luxor in Cairo

Graffiti reading ‘Ding Jinhao was here’ lies scratched into a piece of Egyptian artwork in the 3,500-year-old Temple of Luxor in Cairo

Tourist from Nanjing carried out graffiti attack in Temple of Luxor, his parents confirm

A mainland tourist who defaced a sculpture at a 3,500-year-old Egyptian temple has been identified as a teenager from Nanjing, his embarrassed parents confirmed yesterday.

He had written “Ding Jinhao was here” on the artwork some years ago during a visit to the Temple of Luxor, the parents said in an apologetic interview with Nanjing’s Modern Express newspaper on Saturday.

Ding’s graffiti caused an online stir this week when a microblogger posted a photo of the message, citing it as an example of shameful behaviour by mainland tourists abroad. The post attracted a torrent of replies, including suggestions that the perpetrator be tracked down.

Some disclosed personal information about Ding, including his age and school, after searching his records online.

The website of his former primary school in Nanjing was attacked yesterday. It showed the same message that Ding had left in Egypt, and visitors to the site had to click the message before they could open the homepage.

Ding’s parents told the Modern Express that it was their lack of education and supervision that led to his mischief.

They said the attack happened when their son, now in middle school, was little. They were with a tourist group and did not notice when he scrawled on the sculpture, the mother said.

“We have taken him sightseeing since he was little, and we often saw such graffiti. But we didn’t realise we should have told him that this is wrong,” she said. The mother also implored internet users not to hound her son.

Mainlanders are today the biggest drivers of global tourism, but their sheer numbers and a perception that they can be insensitive travellers have strained their reputation.

At a conference earlier this month to implement the newly passed Tourism Law, vice premier Wang Yang said some mainland tourists behaved poorly and hurt the nation’s image.

The law, to come into force in October, says that tourists should “cherish tourist resources and abide by social morality while sightseeing,” although it mentions no offences or penalties.

Mainland tourists made some 82 million international visits last year, according to the China Tourism Academy.

Source: SCMP “Nanjing teenager exposed as perpetrator of Temple of Luxor graffiti attack”

Related posts:
‘I was here’ Chinese carving on ancient Egyptian wall is decried on Weibo dated May 27, 2013
Uncivilized people from Thousands Years of Civilization dated January 29, 2012
Arrogant Chinese dated February 2, 2012
China: Taiwan to tackle resentment caused by influx of mainland tourists dated February 16, 2012
Outrage after Chinese men on Air France flight take wine bottles ‘to go’ dated Febriary 26, 2013


China: ‘I was here’ Chinese carving on ancient Egyptian wall is decried on Weibo


The inscription at Luxor Temple in Luxor, Egypt. Photo: SCMP Pictures

The inscription at Luxor Temple in Luxor, Egypt. Photo: SCMP Pictures

Reblog of Ernest Kao’s blog at SCMP

Etched into a 3,000-year-old clay wall of Luxor’s most fabled temple is now a strange inscription that looks nothing like what an ancient Egyptian might write.

Locals and archaeologists have made nothing of it, but one humiliated Chinese tourist was able to point out the culprit almost immediately. “Ding Jinhao visited this place,” the carving read – in modern Chinese characters.

“I tried to wipe it with a paper towel, but it didn’t come off. I didn’t dare to use water because the relic was more than 3,000 years old,” a disgraced Shen said on his Sina Weibo account. He said he apologised to the tour guide but still felt ashamed even after he was told it wasn’t his fault.

Shen’s photos of the vandalism at Luxor Temple spread quickly on Weibo at the weekend, the Beijing News reported on Sunday. They showed seven Chinese characters carved into the torso of a drawing of an ancient Egyptian.

Shen’s post racked up more than a 100,000 Weibo comments by Sunday, with most users slamming whoever “Ding Jinghao” was for having “no quality” and being a national “shame”.

Shen said he hoped the matter would bring more attention to Chinese tourists’ behaviour as a reflection of China’s image abroad.

The photos also turned the spotlight yet again to poor behaviour by mainland Chinese tourists less than two weeks after a high-profile telling-off by Vice-Premier Wang Yang.

Wang had admitted that “uncivilised behaviour” by Chinese tourists abroad was harming the country’s image and lamented them for poor “quality and breeding”.

He singled out for condemnation “talking loudly in public places, jay-walking, spitting and willfully carving characters on items in scenic zones”, state media reported.

Under a new Chinese law, travel agencies will be allowed to revoke their contracts with tourists who “engage in activities that violate social ethics”, although it does not specify examples.

Source: SCMP “’I was here’ Chinese carving on ancient Egyptian wall is decried on Weibo”

Related posts:
Uncivilized people from Thousands Years of Civilization dated January 29, 2012
Arrogant Chinese dated February 2, 2012
China: Taiwan to tackle resentment caused by influx of mainland tourists dated February 16, 2012
Outrage after Chinese men on Air France flight take wine bottles ‘to go’ dated Febriary 26, 2013