Chinese President Xi Jinping Challenges US World Leadership


Chinese President Xi Jinping speaks to mark the 60th anniversary of the Five Principles of Peaceful Coexistence. Photographer: Goh Seng Chong/Bloomberg

Chinese President Xi Jinping speaks to mark the 60th anniversary of the Five Principles of Peaceful Coexistence. Photographer: Goh Seng Chong/Bloomberg

Chinese quite popular website qianzhan.com responds in its report to Bloomberg’s report on Xi Jinping’s recent speech to mark the 60th anniversary of the Five Principles of Peaceful Coexistence.

Bloomberg says in its report titled “China’s Xi Urges Asian Security Framework to Counter U.S”, “China’s President Xi Jinping warned against any single power’s attempt to dominate” Xi refrained from calling names, but everybody knows Xi refers to the U.S. just as everybody knows that US pivot to Asia aims at China in spite of repeated denials by the U.S.

Bloomberg shows its insight saying, “China’s President Xi Jinping reiterated his call for a new security framework for Asia, as the country’s claims over disputed territory increasingly challenge U.S. alliances in the region.”

In fact China’s principle of none interference in other countries’ internal affairs is quite flexible.

When China regards the US as it leader, it loyally supported US bombing (military intervention) of Libya in 2011 in spite of the heavy losses it might suffer.

Recently, despite its repeatedly advocated non-interference into Ukraine’s internal affairs, it did not say anything against Putin’s annexation of Crimea.

Why?

Because in 2011, China regarded the US as world leader and wanted to be its ally though the US had no intention to be China’s ally. On the contrary, US launched its policy of pivot to Asia to contain China. US support for Japan and countries contending with China in the South China Sea broke China’s dream to be an ally of the U.S. China immediately turned to seek alliance with Russia.

Now being Russia’s ally, it just turned a blind eye to Russia’s aggression.

Perhaps, American people are happy to hear Obama say that the U.S. will be world leader for 100 years in the future. Some of them perhaps are afraid that China will replace the U.S. as world leader.

No matter how strong China becomes, I hope China will not fall into the trap of world leader ambition. See how hard the US is now to keep its world leadership. It has to spend most of its financial resources to maintain huge aircraft carrier fleets so that whenever other countries need its intervention, it can send its troops there. It has even to fight wars to maintain its leadership.

Due to the money squandered in war and fleets, the U.S. is now heavily in debt. It lacks the funds necessary to improve its infrastructure to deal with natural disasters.

Shall China not learn from U.S. lessons to have the wisdom never to seek world leadership? I admire Chinese leaders wisdom in promising that China will never seek world hegemony no matter how strong it has become. However, I will never believe that China may keep its promises for 100 years. Who knows what will happen I the hundred years.

Seeking world hegemony or not is decided by China’s leader. Mao want to grab the leadership of the communist world from the Soviet Union when China was very poor and backward.

We Chinese people suffered a lot from starvation, poverty, unemployment, etc. due to Mao’s pursuit of world hegemony. Mao’s Great Leap Forward that gave rise to his Great Famine was precisely aimed at becoming the number one in the world.

Xi warned against any single power’s attempt to dominate international affairs and said China will never seek hegemony no matter how strong it becomes. He spoke at a conference in Beijing yesterday to mark the 60th anniversary of the Five Principles of Peaceful Coexistence, policies that have directed the nation’s external relations since the 1950s.

Qianzhan.com says in its report, “President Xi Jinping last month outlined his concept for the establishment of a new order of mutual cooperation and trust in Asia. The Conference on Interaction and Confidence Building Measures in Asia (CICA) comprises more than 20 Asian nations including Japan and the U.S. as observers. CICA’s goal is to improve cooperation on peace and security in the region.

The following is the full text of Bloomberg’s report:

China’s Xi Urges Asian Security Framework to Counter U.S.

By Bloomberg News Jun 29, 2014 12:01 AM GMT+0800

China’s President Xi Jinping warned against any single power’s attempt to dominate

China’s President Xi Jinping reiterated his call for a new security framework for Asia, as the country’s claims over disputed territory increasingly challenge U.S. alliances in the region.

Xi warned against any single power’s attempt to dominate international affairs and said China will never seek hegemony no matter how strong it becomes. He spoke at a conference in Beijing yesterday to mark the 60th anniversary of the Five Principles of Peaceful Coexistence, policies that have directed the nation’s external relations since the 1950s.

China is seeking to cast itself as a major power in the Asia-Pacific and end decades of U.S. economic and military dominance in the region where it’s embroiled in tussles with Vietnam, Japan and the Philippines over territorial claims. U.S. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel warned last month that China’s actions in parts of the disputed South China Sea are destabilizing the region.

“We should work for a new architecture of Asia-Pacific security cooperation that is open, transparent and equal, and bring all countries into a common endeavor to maintain peace and security in our region and the world,” Xi said. “The notion of dominating international affairs belongs to a different age and such an attempt is doomed to failure.”

Xi last month outlined his vision for regional stability and a new security concept at the Conference on Interaction and Confidence Building Measures in Asia. The group, known as CICA, comprises more than 20 mostly Asian nations from Turkey to South Korea that aims to improve cooperation on peace and security in the region. Japan and the U.S. are observers.

Impose Views

In his speech yesterday, Xi said nations should respect a country’s right to choose its own social system and model of development. They should also oppose attempts by any country to impose its views or oust legitimate governments through illegal means, he said.

“Willful threats or use of force should be rejected,” he said. “Flexing military muscles only reveals the lack of moral ground or vision rather than reflecting one’s strength.”

China’s Five Principles of Peaceful Coexistence, the cornerstone of its foreign policy, were laid out in 1954 by then Premier Zhou Enlai and were used to normalize relations with India and strengthen ties with Myanmar that year.

Xi said the principles — mutual respect for sovereignty and territorial integrity, mutual non-aggression, non-interference in another country’s internal affairs, equality and cooperation for mutual benefit, and peaceful co-existence — can contribute to setting up a new model for international relations.

India Relations

Myanmar’s President Thein Sein and India’s Vice President Hamid Ansari were among foreign dignitaries who attended the conference at the Great Hall of the People.

China has reached out quickly to the new administration of India’s Prime Minister Narendra Modi, sending foreign minister Wang Yi to the country on June 8, two weeks after Modi’s inauguration. While China and Myanmar had a close relationship during the five-decade rule of the military junta, ties have become increasingly strained since the country shifted toward democracy.

Source: qianzhan.com “Bloomberg: Xi Jinping’s shocking speech challenges US military hegemony in Asian-Pacific region” (summary by Chan Kai Yee based on the report in Chinese)

Source: Bloomberg “China’s Xi Urges Asian Security Framework to Counter U.S.”


China Fields DF-26C New Intermediate-Range Nuclear Missile to Reach Guam


Chinese Internet photos first published Feb. 29, 2012 show China's new DF-26c intermediate-range ballistic missile

Chinese Internet photos first published Feb. 29, 2012 show China’s new DF-26c intermediate-range ballistic missile

U.S. intelligence agencies recently confirmed China’s development of a new intermediate-range nuclear missile (IRBM) called the Dongfeng-26C (DF-26C), U.S. officials said.

The new missile is estimated to have a range of at least 2,200 miles—enough for Chinese military forces to conduct attacks on U.S. military facilities in Guam, a major hub for the Pentagon’s shift of U.S. forces to Asia Pacific.

As part of the force posture changes, several thousand Marines now based in Okinawa will be moved to Guam as part of the Asia pivot.

In April, the Pentagon announced it is deploying one of its newest anti-missile systems, the Theater High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) to Guam because of growing missile threats to the U.S. island, located in the South Pacific some 1,600 miles southeast of Japan and 4,000 miles from Hawaii.

And on Feb. 10, the Navy announced the deployment of a fourth nuclear attack submarine to Guam, the USS Topeka.

Chinese military officials said the Topeka deployment is part of the Pentagon’s Air Sea Battle Concept and posed a threat to China.

Disclosure of the new Chinese IRBM follows the announcement this week by Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel that the U.S. military is sharply reducing its military forces.

“How can [U.S. policymakers] possibly justify such reductions in defense spending when American forces as far away as Guam, Korea, and Okinawa are targeted by these nuclear missiles,” said one official familiar with reports of the DF-26C.

It was the first official confirmation of China’s new IRBM, which officials believe is part of the People’s Liberation Army military buildup aimed at controlling the Asia Pacific waters and preventing the U.S. military entry to the two island chains along China’s coasts.

The first island chain extends from Japan’s southern Ryuku Islands southward and east of the Philippines and covers the entire South China Sea. The second island chain stretches more than a thousand miles into the Pacific in an arc from Japan westward and south to western New Guinea.

Few details could be learned about the new missile and a Pentagon spokesman declined to comment, citing a policy of not commenting on intelligence matters.

The missile is said to be on a road-mobile chassis and to use solid fuel. The fuel and mobility allow the missile to be hidden in underground facilities and fired on short notice, making it very difficult to counter in a conflict.

The DF-26C is expected to be mentioned in the Pentagon’s forthcoming annual report on China’s military power, which is due to Congress next month.

Adm. Cecil Haney, commander of the U.S. Strategic Command, told a congressional hearing this week that missile and other nuclear threats from China and Russia continue to grow.

“The current security environment is more complex, dynamic, and uncertain than at any time in recent history,” Haney said in testimony to the Senate Armed Services Committee. “Advances of significant nation state and non-state military capabilities continue across all air, sea, land, and space domains—as well as in cyberspace. This trend has the potential to adversely impact strategic stability.”

Russia and China in particular “are investing in long-term and wide-ranging military modernization programs to include extensive modernization of their strategic capabilities,” Haney said. “Nuclear weapons ambitions and the proliferation of weapon and nuclear technologies continue, increasing risk that countries will resort to nuclear coercion in regional crises or nuclear use in future conflicts.”

Richard Fisher, a China military affairs specialist, said Chinese reports have discussed a DF-26 missile as a medium-range or intermediate-range system. Medium-range is considered between 621 miles and 1,864 miles. Intermediate-range is between 1,864 and 3,418 miles

Online reports of three new types of medium- and intermediate-range missiles have said the weapons could be multi-role systems capable of firing nuclear or conventional warheads, along with maneuvering anti-ship and hypersonic warheads, Fisher said.

According to Fisher, two likely transporter erector launchers (TEL) for the new missiles were displayed last year on Chinese websites. They include two versions from missile TEL manufacturing companies called Sanjiang and Taian.

Three years ago, the state-run Global Times reported that the China Aerospace Science and Industry Corp. (CASIC) was working on a new 2,400-mile range missile that would be deployed by 2015.

That Chinese manufacturer also produced the DF-21 missile, prompting speculation that the DF-26C is a follow-up version of that system.

“China is developing and will soon deploy new longer-range theater missiles as part of its anti-access, area denial strategies, to be part of a combined force of new long-range bombers armed with supersonic anti-ship missiles, plus space weapons and larger numbers of submarines,” Fisher said in an email.

These forces are being deployed to push U.S. forces out of the first island chain and to have the capability to reach the second chain, including Guam, he said.

“China also consistently refuses to consider formal dialogue about its future nuclear forces or to consider any near term limits on them,” Fisher said. “China is giving Washington and its Asian allies no other choice but to pursue an ‘armed peace’ in Asia.”

According to Fisher, the Chinese missile buildup has forced the Navy to redesign its first aircraft carrier-based unmanned combat vehicle into a larger and longer aircraft.

The new Chinese long-range missiles also highlight the urgent need for a new U.S. long-range bomber to replace an aging fleet of strategic bombers.

To counter the Chinese threats, the United States should field its force of anti-ship ballistic missiles on submarines to match Chinese capabilities and deter China from using its naval power against U.S. allies such as Japan and the Philippines, Fisher said.

Russian officials have cited China’s intermediate-range missiles as one reason Moscow is seeking to jettison the U.S.-Russia Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty (INF), which bans medium and intermediate ballistic and cruise missiles.

U.S. officials have said Russia is violating the INF treaty with a new cruise missile and testing its long-range missiles to INF ranges.

“It is time to retire the INF treaty because the United States now requires this class of missiles in order to deter China,” Fisher said.

“The bottom line: We are in an arms race with China and if America falters, so will our strategic position in Asia, which will surely increase the chances of conflict, nuclear proliferation and even nuclear war.”

The Pentagon’s latest report on China’s military forces, published last year, said the PLA is investing in “a series of advanced short- and medium-range conventional ballistic missiles, land-attack and anti-ship cruise missiles, counter-space weapons, and military cyberspace capabilities.”

The weapons “appear designed to enable anti-access/area-denial (A2/AD) missions, what PLA strategists refer to as ‘counter-intervention operations,’” the report said.

The Washington Free Beacon first reported on March 7, 2012, that the Chinese military had revealed online photos of a new intermediate-range nuclear missile.

The new missile is believed by U.S. officials to be the DF-26C.

China’s military frequently uses the Internet to reveal the first photos of new weapons systems.

Analysts said the missile TEL shown in the photo is smaller in size than China’s DF-31 intercontinental missile and larger than the DF-21 missile.

Source: Washington Free Beacon “China Fields New Intermediate-Range Nuclear Missile: DF-26C deployment confirmed”

Related posts

  • China Developing DF-26 Aircraft Carrier Killer Missile with Hypersonic Warhead dated January 30, 2014
  • China challenging U.S. military technological edge: Pentagon official dated January 29, 2014
  • China’s 12 Advanced Weapons to Be Turned out or Developed in 2014 dated January 24, 2014
  • China Tests Mach 10 Hypersonic Weapon: US media dated January 14, 2014
  • China: DF-41 ICBM with Range of 14,000 km, Able to Break Through US Anti-missile Network dated October 8, 2013
  • First Revealing Photo of Simulated Test of China’s Anti-Carrier Missile dated January 24, 2013

 


Pentagon plays down intelligence officer’s provocative China assessment


The Pentagon on Thursday played down remarks by a senior Navy intelligence officer who told a public forum that he believed China was training its forces to be capable of carrying out a “short, sharp” war with Japan in the East China Sea.

The comments by Captain James Fanell, director of intelligence and information operations at the U.S. Pacific Fleet, were little noticed when he made them last week at a conference on maritime strategy called “West 2014” in San Diego. They can be seen here: link.reuters.com/qyq96v

Fanell also predicted China, which declared an air defense zone last year in the East China Sea where it is locked in a territorial dispute with Japan over a string of small islands, would declare another air defense zone by the end of 2015, this time in the South China Sea.

The Pentagon’s top spokesman, Rear Admiral John Kirby, declined to comment on whether it was appropriate for Fanell to publicly offer such a blunt assessment, but said the Pentagon wanted closer ties with China’s military.

“Those were his views to express,” Kirby told a Pentagon news conference.

“What I can tell you about what Secretary Hagel believes is that we all continue to believe that the peaceful, prosperous rise of China is a good thing for the region, for the world,” he said, referring to Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel.

Asked whether the Pentagon shared Fanell’s assessments, Kirby said it would be inappropriate for him to speak to the intentions or motivations of another country’s military.

“It’s for China to speak to China’s intentions and motivations and their relations with their neighbors. And nothing’s changed about our view here,” Kirby said.

Ties between China and U.S. ally Japan have worsened due in part to mistrust over China’s military buildup and their territorial dispute in the East China Sea.

The U.S. military has refused to recognize the air defense zone China declared last year. Some U.S. officials have warned that any declaration by Beijing of another such zone in the South China Sea could result in changes to U.S. military deployments in the region.

Asked whether Fanell’s comments could be a “trial balloon” signaling a possible toughening of the U.S. military posture in the region, Kirby said: “I would refute that absolutely, not a trial balloon.”

Fanell, addressing the San Diego forum, said he expected China to declare an air defense zone in the South China Sea in 2014 or 2015.

Fanell said China was expanding training for its navy beyond the “long-standing task to restore Taiwan to the mainland.”

“We witnessed the massive amphibious and cross military region exercise, Mission Action 2013, and concluded that the PLA (People’s Liberation Army) has been given a new task: To be able to conduct a short, sharp war to destroy Japanese forces in the East China Sea,” he said.

He added that such a war could be expected to be followed by a seizure of the islands at the heart of China’s territorial dispute with Japan. The islands are known as the Senkaku by Japan and the Diaoyu by China.

Source: Reuters “Pentagon plays down intelligence officer’s provocative China assessment”

Related posts:

  • South China Sea Disputes: US Pivot to Asia Has Zero Effect dated February 19, 2014
  • US, China, ASEAN Reached Consensus to Resolve Disputes through Code of Conduct dated February 18, 2014
  • Kerry Got Beijing Promise to Resolve Territorial Disputes Peacefully dated February 17, 2014
  • Kerry in China: Li Keqiang Iron Hand in Velvet Glove, Wang Yi Black in the Face dated February 15, 2014
  • US Not Willing to Be Drawn into War by Japan or Philippines dated February 11, 2014
  • The US Will Be the Biggest Winner if Japan Is Defeated by China in the War dated February 5, 2014
  • The Mystery of What Biden Has Got in His Beijing Visit dated December 6, 2013

China challenging U.S. military technological edge: Pentagon official


Members of a military band attend a session of the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference (CPPCC) of the Shanghai Municipal Committee, in Shanghai January 18, 2014. Credit: Reuters/Aly Song

Members of a military band attend a session of the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference (CPPCC) of the Shanghai Municipal Committee, in Shanghai January 18, 2014. Credit: Reuters/Aly Song

The U.S. military’s technological superiority is increasingly challenged by China, and efforts to maintain an edge are complicated by shrinking defense budgets that have cut money for development, the Pentagon’s top weapons buyer said on Tuesday.

Frank Kendall, the deputy undersecretary of defense for acquisition and technology, told lawmakers the U.S. military’s technological superiority is being “challenged in ways that I have not seen for decades, particularly in the Asia-Pacific region,” where China is pursuing a rapid modernization program.

“Technological superiority is not assured,” Kendall told the Armed Services Committee in the House of Representatives. “This is not a future problem. This is a here-now problem.”

With China, Russia and other countries rapidly modernizing their militaries, Pentagon officials are voicing increasing concern about the possibility of losing the technological edge that has enabled the U.S. military to dominate the battlefield over the past 25 years.

U.S. defense officials say they do not expect a conflict with China or Russia, but the chances are that some of what they develop will be sold to other nations and the U.S. military may eventually face those systems.

Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel underscored the value of advanced research in a visit this month to Sandia National Laboratories in New Mexico, saying the “technological edge that we’ve been able to maintain is critically important … in the world that we’re in today with more complications, more combustibility.”

Admiral Samuel Locklear, the head of U.S. Pacific Command, told reporters in Washington recently the military’s “relative dominance” had been diminishing after a period of unequalled superiority.

“That’s not something to be afraid of; it’s just to be pragmatic about,” Locklear said, adding that the military would have to think carefully about which systems to develop in the future in order to maintain that edge.

Asked by a lawmaker how the technology race with China was going, Kendall indicated it was not positive, even though U.S. defense spending is far greater than China’s.

The base U.S. defense budget will drop below $500 billion in 2014 under a deal finalized in January, while China’s grew to $119 billion last year after another double-digit jump.

“Overall, China’s military investments are increasing in double-digit numbers each year, about 10 percent,” Kendall said. “Their budget is far smaller than ours. But their personnel costs are also far smaller than ours.”

Personnel costs make up roughly half of the U.S. defense budget.

Kendall told lawmakers the Pentagon’s ability to respond by developing new technologies was “severely limited by the current budget situation,” with the department facing hundreds of billions in cuts to projected spending over the next decade.

Lawmakers voiced concern about not having known about Pentagon concerns earlier and asked Kendall when he first realized U.S. technological superiority was being challenged.

“We’ve had a steady decline (in spending) over the last several years of cuts … We’ve been pleading with you guys to come over and tell us the problem,” Representative Randy Forbes of Virginia, a Republican, told Kendall.

Kendall said the issue became “a more visible concern” when the department conducted a strategic review after Congress approved the budget cuts in 2011.

Source: Reuters “China challenging U.S. military technological edge: Pentagon official”

Related posts:

  • China’s 12 Advanced Weapons to Be Turned out or Developed in 2014 dated January 24, 2014
  • Shocking Mystery of China’s Unshakable Determination to Buy Russian Su-35s dated January 21
  • Details of New-Version J-20 Stealth Fighter Jet with Lots of Improvement dated January 20
  • China’s New Stealth Aircrafts, J-23 and J-25 in addition to J-20, J-31 dated January 19
  • New Aircraft Carrier Confirmed Being Built for China to Have at Least 4 Carriers dated January 19

China says carrier tests in South China Sea going well


Chinese naval soldiers monitor meteorological indicators on the aircraft carrier ''Liaoning'', as they carry out training in South China Sea, December 22, 2013. Credit: Reuters/China Daily

Chinese naval soldiers monitor meteorological indicators on the aircraft carrier ”Liaoning”, as they carry out training in South China Sea, December 22, 2013. Credit: Reuters/China Daily

China’s first and only aircraft carrier has successfully carried out a series of tests during a training mission in the disputed South China Sea, state media reported on Monday.

This month’s drills off the coast of Hainan Island mark not only the first time China has sent a carrier into the South China Sea but the first time it has maneuvered with the kind of strike group of escort ships U.S. carriers deploy, according to regional military officers and analysts.

The Liaoning has carried out more than 100 tests, including of its combat systems, and training tasks since early December, the official English-language China Daily said.

“The Liaoning successfully performed several tests of the combat system today and organized for the first time comprehensive combat training,” the newspaper cited the navy saying in a statement.

“Through this operation, we tested the carrier’s combat capability and tried the performance of its propulsion and seaworthiness.”

The mission has been characterized by “a large number of tests, rigorous standards, complicated circumstances as well as collaboration with multiple military units”, it added.

The carrier is being escorted by two destroyers and two frigates.

“The South China Sea has deep waters, strong wind and big waves, making it a suitable place for the aircraft carrier to conduct tests and training,” the China Daily quoted the Liaoning’s captain, Zhang Zheng, as saying.

Zhang said drills included practicing defending against hostile aircraft, ships and submarines in simulations.

The Liaoning – a Soviet-era ship bought from Ukraine in 1998 and re-fitted in a Chinese shipyard – has long been a symbol of China’s naval build-up.

After two decades of double-digit increases in the military budget, China’s admirals plan to develop a full blue-water navy capable of defending growing economic interests as well as disputed territory in the South and East China Seas.

Carrier strike groups sit at the core of those ambitions – and successfully operating the 60,000-tonne Liaoning is the first step in what state media and some military experts believe will be China’s deployment of several locally built carriers by 2020.

The USS Cowpens narrowly avoided colliding with a Chinese warship escorting the Liaoning while operating in international waters on December 5, the U.S. Navy has said. U.S. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel on Thursday called the Chinese ship’s actions “irresponsible”.

China’s official Xinhua news agency said the Cowpens was “warned” by the carrier task force, adding the U.S. vessel was “intentionally” putting the Liaoning under surveillance.

Source: Reuters “China says carrier tests in South China Sea going well”

Related posts:

  • The Liaoning to Defend South China Sea Islands in Case of War with Japan dated December 1
  • China military sends air patrols through new defense zone: Xinhua dated November 29
  • Chinese Rear Admiral: B-52 Flew Prudently for Fear of Being Shot Down by China dated November 29
  • Signals of Beijing’s Determination to Fight for Diaoyu Islands dated November 26
  • China advises nationals living in Japan to register with embassy in Tokyo dated November 26
  • Sino-Japanese Air Confrontation, Repetition of Hainan Collision between Chinese and US aircrafts? dated November 26

China behavior in South China Sea ship encounter ‘irresponsible’: U.S.


U.S. Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel speaks to reporters at the Al Udeid Airbase, west of Doha December 10, 2013. Credit: Reuters/Mark Wilson/Pool

U.S. Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel speaks to reporters at the Al Udeid Airbase, west of Doha December 10, 2013. Credit: Reuters/Mark Wilson/Pool

China’s behavior in a narrowly averted naval collision in the South China Sea was both “unhelpful” and “irresponsible,” U.S. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel said on Thursday, warning against incidents could escalate existing U.S.-Chinese tensions.

“That action by the Chinese, cutting their ship 100 yards out in front of the (USS) Cowpens, was not a responsible action. It was unhelpful; it was irresponsible,” Hagel told reporters at the Pentagon.

China on Wednesday acknowledged an encounter in early December between a Chinese naval vessel and the U.S. warship in the South China Sea.

China said its ship was conducting “normal patrols” when it encountered the U.S. missile cruiser, and its official news agency accused the United States of deliberate provocative behavior. But U.S. officials depicted the event differently.

They said the U.S. ship was forced to take evasive action to avoid collision.

The incident comes after Beijing’s declaration of an air defense identification zone further north in the East China Sea ratcheted up bilateral tensions and drew criticism from Washington, Tokyo and Seoul.

Experts have called the incident the most serious U.S.-Chinese maritime encounter in the disputed South China Sea since 2009.

Hagel said that such “incendiary” incidents had the potential to cause a “miscalculation.”

“We need to work toward putting in place some kind of a mechanism in Asia-Pacific and with China … to be able to defuse some of these issues as the occur,” he said.

General Martin Dempsey, chairman of the U.S. military’s Joint Chiefs of Staff, told reporters there had been no changes to rules of engagement given to forces in that region in order to prevent run-ins with China.

“What we do constantly though is we remain alert for changes in the environment,” Dempsey said. “There are times that are more sensitive than others and we’re in a heightened period of sensitivity. And you can count on our mariners and airmen to be aware of that.”

Source: Reuters “China behavior in South China Sea ship encounter ‘irresponsible’: U.S.”

Related posts:

  • China paper says US ship harassed China fleet dated December 17
  • Chinese Naval Vessel Tries to Force US Warship to Stop in International Waters dated December 14
  • China Does Not Budge in its Brink of War Policy on Air Defense Identification Zone dated December 5
  • China advises nationals living in Japan to register with embassy in Tokyo dated November 26
  • Sino-Japanese Air Confrontation, Repetition of Hainan Collision between Chinese and US aircrafts? dated November 26

US affirms support for Japan in islands dispute with China


Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force's PC3 surveillance plane flies around the disputed islands in the East China Sea, known as the Senkaku isles in Japan and Diaoyu in China, in this October 13. Credit: REUTERS/Kyodo/Files

Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force’s PC3 surveillance plane flies around the disputed islands in the East China Sea, known as the Senkaku isles in Japan and Diaoyu in China, in this October 13. Credit: REUTERS/Kyodo/Files

China’s establishment of its East China Sea Air Defense Identification Zone is a sure signal of its intention to fight a war with Japan if Japan fires the first shot.

It aims first of all at pleasing the powerful conservative faction at home and obtaining the faction’s support for Xi Jinping’s ambitious reform and anti-corruption and mass line campaigns.

That being the case, in spite of US protest, Chinese leaders have to impose their control of the Zone. Otherwise, they will lose their credibility at home and encounter great obstacles to their ambitious reform.

Knowing that, the US praises Japan for its restraint while openly challenging China by sending its military aircrafts into the Zone. It’s America’s wise move to prevent a war as it pleases Japan that the US has made China unable to impose effective control of the Zone so that Japan will act with restraint.

Reuters’ report today gives a description of US efforts as follows:

The United States pledged support for ally Japan on Wednesday in a growing dispute with China over islands in the East China Sea and senior U.S. administration officials accused Beijing of behavior that had unsettled its neighbors.

U.S. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel assured his Japanese counterpart in a phone call that the two nations’ defense pact covers the small islands where China established a new airspace defense zone last week and commended Tokyo “for exercising appropriate restraint,” a Pentagon spokesman said.

China’s declaration raised the stakes in a territorial standoff between Beijing and Tokyo over the area, which includes the tiny uninhabited islands known as the Senkaku in Japan and the Diaoyu in China.

The United States defied China’s demand that airplanes flying near the islands identify themselves to Chinese authorities, flying two unarmed B-52 bombers over the islands on Tuesday without informing Beijing.

It was a sharp reminder to China that the United States still maintains a large military presence in the region despite concerns among U.S. allies that President Barack Obama’s “pivot to Asia” strategy has borne little fruit.

In a previously announced trip, Vice President Joe Biden will visit China, Japan and South Korea next week. He will seek to ease tensions heightened by China’s declaration, senior administration officials said.

Washington does not take a position on the sovereignty of the islands but recognizes that Tokyo has administrative control over them and the United States is therefore bound to defend Japan in the event of an armed conflict.

Some experts say the Chinese move was aimed at eroding Tokyo’s claim to administrative control over the area.

China’s defense ministry said it had monitored the U.S. bombers on Tuesday. A Pentagon spokesman said the planes had not been observed or contacted by Chinese aircraft.

‘FRICTION AND UNCERTAINTY’

In a conference calls with reporters, senior U.S. administration officials said China’s declaration raised serious concerns about its intentions.

“It causes friction and uncertainty, it constitutes a unilateral change to the status quo in the region, a region that’s already fraught. And it increases the risk of miscalculation and accidents,” one of the officials said.

China’s declaration of a defense zone affects not only Japan but aircraft from other countries throughout the world that routinely fly over the area, the official said.

Biden will raise the issue of the defense zone directly with policy makers in Beijing, the official said. “It also allows the vice president to make the broader point that there’s an emerging pattern of behavior that is unsettling to China’s own neighbors.”

The official said it raised questions about “how China operates in international space and how China deals with areas of disagreement with its neighbors.”

The Pentagon signaled that more military flights into the defense zone claimed by China can be expected.

Colonel Steve Warren, a Pentagon spokesman, told Reuters: “We’ll continue to conduct operations in the region, as we have” in the past. He declined to offer details on timing.

The U.S. State Department said it was still trying to determine whether the new defense zone rules applied to civil and commercial aircraft and it told U.S. airlines to take steps to operate safely over the East China Sea.

In addition to the U.S. B-52 flights on Tuesday, flights of Japan’s main airline similarly ignored Chinese authorities while flying through the zone.

Japan Airlines and ANA Holdings said they had stopped giving flight plans and other information to Chinese authorities following a request from the Japanese government.

Both said they had not experienced any problems when passing through the zone. Japan’s aviation industry association said it had concluded there was no threat to passenger safety by ignoring the Chinese demands, JAL said.

Source: Reuters “U.S. affirms support for Japan in islands dispute with China”


Defying China, US aircraft fly over East China Sea without notification


A group of disputed islands, Uotsuri island (top), Minamikojima (bottom) and Kitakojima, known as Senkaku in Japan and Diaoyu in China is seen in the East China Sea, in this photo taken by Kyodo September 2012. Credit: Reuters/Kyodo

A group of disputed islands, Uotsuri island (top), Minamikojima (bottom) and Kitakojima, known as Senkaku in Japan and Diaoyu in China is seen in the East China Sea, in this photo taken by Kyodo September 2012. Credit: Reuters/Kyodo

Two unarmed U.S. B-52 bombers on a training mission flew over disputed islands in the East China Sea without informing Beijing, Pentagon officials said on Tuesday, defying China’s declaration of a new airspace defense zone in the region.

The flight on Monday night did not prompt a response from China, and the White House on Tuesday urged Beijing to resolve its dispute with Japan over the islands diplomatically, without resorting to “threats or inflammatory language.”

China published coordinates for an East China Sea Air Defence Identification Zone over the weekend and warned it would take “defensive emergency measures” against aircraft that failed to identify themselves properly in the airspace.

The zone covers most of that sea and includes the skies over islands at the heart of a territorial dispute with Japan.

“The policy announced by the Chinese over the weekend is unnecessarily inflammatory,” White House spokesman Josh Earnest told reporters in California, where President Barack Obama is traveling.

“These are the kinds of differences that should not be addressed with threats or inflammatory language, but rather can and should be resolved diplomatically,” he said.

The dispute flared ahead of a trip to the region by Vice President Joe Biden, who is scheduled to travel to Japan early next week and also has stops in China and South Korea. The White House announced the trip in early November.

Two U.S. B-52 bombers carried out the flight, part of a long-planned exercise, on Monday night Eastern Standard Time, a U.S. military official said, identifying the type of aircraft on condition of anonymity.

Pentagon officials said there was no Chinese response.

“We have conducted operations in the area of the Senkakus. We have continued to follow our normal procedures, which include not filing flight plans, not radioing ahead and not registering our frequencies,” spokesman Colonel Steve Warren said, using the Japanese name for the islands.

DESTABILIZING

The United States and close ally Japan have sharply criticized China’s airspace declaration, with U.S. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel calling it a “destabilizing attempt to alter the status quo in the region.” He said on Saturday the United States would not change how it operates there.

Some airlines in the region agreed to begin complying with the Chinese identification measures, which effectively force countries to recognize Beijing’s authority there.

But Japan’s two biggest airlines – Japan Airlines and ANA Holdings – bowed to a Japanese government request to stop complying with the Chinese demands for flight plans and other information. They will stop providing the information beginning Wednesday, spokesmen for the carriers said.

Experts said the Chinese move was aimed at chipping away at Tokyo’s claim to administrative control over the area, including the tiny uninhabited islands known as the Senkaku in Japan and the Diaoyu in China.

While Washington does not take a position on the sovereignty of the islands, it recognizes that Japan has administrative control over them and is therefore bound by treaty to defend Japan in the event of an armed conflict.

The Pentagon said the training exercise “involved two aircraft flying from Guam and returning to Guam.” Warren said the U.S. military aircraft were neither observed nor were contacted by the Chinese aircraft.

China’s Defence Ministry said on Monday it had lodged protests with the U.S. and Japanese embassies in Beijing over the criticism from Washington and Tokyo of the zone.

China also summoned Japan’s ambassador, warning Tokyo to “stop words and actions which create friction and harm regional stability,” China’s Foreign Ministry said. Meanwhile, Tokyo and Seoul summoned Chinese diplomats to protest.

In addition, China sent its sole aircraft carrier on a training mission into the South China Sea on Tuesday amid maritime disputes with the Philippines and other neighbors and tension over its airspace defense zone.

It is the first time it was sent to the South China Sea.

Australia summoned China’s ambassador to express concern over its imposition of an “Air Defence Identification Zone” over the East China Sea, the foreign minister said on Tuesday, decrying the move as unhelpful in a region beset by tension.

Source: Reuters “Defying China, U.S. aircraft fly over East China Sea without notification”

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China’s charm offensive at Shangri-La Dialogue in Singapore


China's People's Liberation Army (PLA) Deputy Chief of General Staff, Lieutenant General Qi Jianguo (R), welcomes U.S. Navy Admiral Samuel Locklear, the commander of U.S. forces in the Pacific region, to a meeting on the sidelines of the 12th International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS) Asia Security Summit: The Shangri-La Dialogue, in Singapore June 2, 2013.  Credit: Reuters/Edgar Su

China’s People’s Liberation Army (PLA) Deputy Chief of General Staff, Lieutenant General Qi Jianguo (R), welcomes U.S. Navy Admiral Samuel Locklear, the commander of U.S. forces in the Pacific region, to a meeting on the sidelines of the 12th International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS) Asia Security Summit: The Shangri-La Dialogue, in Singapore June 2, 2013.
Credit: Reuters/Edgar Su

Senior Chinese military officials came ready to talk at a major regional security forum over the weekend, surprising delegates with a new sense of openness at a time when Beijing is making strident claims to territory across Asia’s seas.

No one expected any resolution of disputes over maritime boundaries, accusations of Chinese cyber-espionage, Beijing’s suspicions about the U.S. “pivot” to Asia or other prickly issues at the annual Shangri-La Dialogue in Singapore.

But the charm offensive by the People’s Liberation Army (PLA) officers, less than a week before Chinese President Xi Jinping meets U.S. President Barack Obama for an informal summit, appeared to be designed to tone down the recent assertiveness by emphasizing cooperation and discussion.

“There’s no question that this year the PLA delegation has come very prepared to engage in dialogue,” said John Chipman, director-general of the London-based International Institute for Strategic Studies, which convenes the forum. “The intensity of the Chinese engagement and the manner of their engagement is different.”

The defense minister of the Philippines, Voltaire Gazmin, also noted a shift.

“It’s a total turnaround. They have been talking about peaceful resolutions, no outward acts,” Gazmin told Reuters. “But we still hope to see that these words are put into action.”

China claims large swathes of the South China Sea, which could be rich in oil and gas. The Philippines and other Southeast Asia nations have challenged Beijing over those claims.

Beijing is also embroiled in a row with Tokyo over uninhabited islands in the East China Sea, which are also believed to contain large energy deposits.

China, the world’s second-largest economy and a rising military power, is aware it needs what it calls a “stable and peaceful external environment” for its own development.

Indeed, Chinese officials at the forum sought to ease concerns about Beijing’s intentions.

“China’s development and prosperity is a major opportunity instead of a challenge or even threat to countries in the Asia-Pacific region,” Lieutenant General Qi Jianguo, the PLA’s deputy chief of general staff, told a session on regional security.

Qi, China’s top official at the forum, said dialogue “by no means denotes unconditional compromise” and he gave no ground on sovereignty claims, calling the presence of Chinese warships in the East China Sea and the South China Sea “totally legitimate and uncontroversial to patrol within our own territory”.

But he said “China is a peace-loving nation” and went on to answer more than a dozen questions from delegates.

PLAYING THE GAME

Unlike most other countries, China has sent its defense minister to the Shangri-La Dialogue only once – in 2011.

Despite that absence, a senior U.S. official accompanying Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel to the forum saw a big change in the Chinese delegation.

“Last year China had a very, very small contingent, a relatively junior-ranking contingent. This year they came in force … and have been very active in the panels,” said the official. “That’s very, very good. We want everybody to engage.”

While there was a fair amount of skepticism about China’s position from security analysts during the various sessions, Chinese officials were not shy about taking tough questions or asking their own from the floor.

Major General Yao Yunzhu from the PLA’s Academy of Military Science asked Hagel after his speech how Washington could reassure Beijing that the U.S. focus on Asia was not an “attempt to counter China’s rising influence”.

“China is not convinced,” she said in fluent English.

“That’s really the whole point behind closer military-to-military relationships,” Hagel replied. “We don’t want miscalculations and misunderstandings and misinterpretations.”

The higher-ranking Chinese delegation this year and their participation in the sessions shows “a more active effort on the part of the Chinese to reach out”, Canada’s defense minister, Peter MacKay, told Reuters. “I see that as positive.”

The Chinese worked “with a very courteous style, with a much less combative style”, Chipman said, noting the remarks by “a young officer of the PLA congratulating the defense minister of Japan for his very important and serious speech”.

Japan, a U.S. ally, is strengthening its economy and military to play a responsible international role, Defense Minister Itsunori Onodera said in his speech.

Onodera, addressing lingering suspicion about his country’s intentions given its role in World War Two, said Japan “caused tremendous damage and suffering” to its neighbors in the past but wanted to look to the future by promoting cooperation.

Those comments were what won public praise from the PLA officer, who also spoke in English.

“The other Asians are saying the Chinese have decided to play the game, that is to pitch up, make an impression and do so in the right way,” said Chipman.

“How that has an impact on the ground, at sea, in space, in cyber … is a different question.”

Source: Reuters “Analysis: China turns on the charm at regional security forum”