China says U.S. warship illegally enters its territory in S. China Sea


May 20, 2021 11:35 PM HKT

China said on Thursday an American warship had illegally entered its territorial waters in the South China Sea and was expelled, which the United States denied in the latest salvoes over Beijing’s claims in the busy waterway.

In a statement, the Chinese military’s Southern Theatre Command said the USS Curtis Wilbur entered the waters near the Paracel islands without permission, adding that its ships and planes followed the U.S. vessel out.

It said the U.S. action violated China’s sovereignty and undermined regional peace and stability.

However, the U.S. Navy’s 7th Fleet said the vessel “asserted navigational rights and freedoms” near the Paracel islands, over which China, Taiwan and Vietnam all claim sovereignty.

The Chinese military’s comments were false, it added.

“USS Curtis Wilbur was not ‘expelled’ from any nation’s territory,” it said. “USS Curtis Wilbur conducted this Freedom of Navigation Operation (FONOP) in accordance with international law and then continued on to conduct normal operations in international waters.”

The South China Sea has become one of many flashpoints in the testy relationship between China and the United States, with Washington rejecting what it calls unlawful territorial claims by Beijing in the resource-rich waters.

U.S. warships have passed through the South China Sea with increasing frequency in recent years, in a show of force against the Chinese claims.

On Tuesday, the USS Curtis Wilbur had sailed through the Taiwan Strait, angering China, which claims self-ruled Taiwan as its own territory. read more

In a statement addressing both that incident and Thursday’s flare-up, China’s defence ministry described the U.S. warship’s movements as a serious provocation.

“China’s military will take all necessary measures to deal with all threats and provocations,” it added.

Source: Reuters “China says U.S. warship illegally enters its territory in S. China Sea”

Note: This is Reuters’ report I post here for readers’ information. It does not mean whether I agree or disagree with the report’ views.


Another nuclear power joins the dispute in the South China Sea


By 9News Staff

2:47pm Mar 2, 2021

Beijing is stepping up operations in the South China Sea in an effort to “modernise” its armed forces, while the US and France are also engaged in sending vessels to the disputed region.

The People’s Liberation Army is undertaking a month-long military exercise to build up its joint operations capacity, the South China Morning Post reported.

Non-PLA vessels have been warned to not enter the training zone, which has a radius of 5km off the coast of Guangdong Province.

“We will not lose an inch of our land left to us by our ancestors,” the defence ministry said in a statement.

“We are determined to maintain the peace and stability of the South China Sea. We oppose any nations creating tensions and stepping up military presence under the name of freedom of navigation.”

“Freedom of navigation” is why the US, among other nations including Vietnam and Australia, have been increasing patrols in the South China Sea in recent months.

Source: 9news.com.au “Another nuclear power joins the dispute in the South China Sea”

Note: This is 9news.com.au’s report I post here for readers’ information. It does not mean that I agree or disagree with the report’ views.


PLA navy calls U.S. destroyer sailing in South China Sea ‘provocative’


CGTN 23:06, 09-Oct-2020

A People’s Liberation Army (PLA) spokesman on Friday said a U.S. destroyer entered China’s Xisha Islands in the South China Sea without permission, calling the sailing “dangerous” and “provocative.”

The Chinese navy is aware of the U.S. navigation and sent naval and aerial forces to monitor the sailing, Senior Colonel Zhang Nandong, also spokesperson for the Southern Theater Command of the PLA, said in a statement.

The guided-missile destroyer USS John S. McCain entered China’s water without any permission from the Chinese government, and we urge the U.S. to immediately stop such provocative action and restrain its military operation, Zhang said, adding China’s sovereignty over the South China Sea is indisputable, vowing to defend China’s territorial integrity with all necessary measures.

The U.S. has frequently sent warships to the water to flex its muscles and to strengthen its military presence, which severely harms China’s sovereignty and security interests and undermines regional peace and stability, Zhang said.

Source: CGTN “PLA navy calls U.S. destroyer sailing in South China Sea ‘provocative’”

Note: This is CGTN”s report I post here for readers’ information. It does not mean that I agree or disagree with the report’ views.


Great Powers Play Children’s Games


China regards its rights and interests as its core interests so that when the US sent 2 aircraft carrier battle groups to force China to accept the arbitration award that deprives China of its rights and interests in the South China Sea, China challenged the US with war. The US certainly did not want to fight a war for the interests of its ally the Philippines so that there was no war there.

However, in order to prove its existence in the South China Sea, the US sent warships to conduct freedom of navigation operations there.

As pointed out in my previous post “South China Sea Disputes are about Oil, Gas, fishing Not Navigation” on February 2, US warships did not affect China’s core interests, China only drove away US warships.

Both the US and China were satisfied. One has succeeded in proving its military existence in the South China Sea and the other, protecting its sovereignty there. However, isn’t such operation like children’s games instead great powers’ moves. Stupid!

In addition, US Navy Times says in its report “Another busy week in the South China Sea” that US F-35B jets conducted training over the Philippines to the east of the South China Sea but regard it as US activities in the South China Sea that China routinely objects. Is Navy Times ignorant of geography.

Comment by Chan Kai Yee on Navy Times’ report, full text of which can be viewed at https://www.navytimes.com/news/your-navy/2019/02/11/another-busy-week-in-the-south-china-sea/


U.S. destroyers sail in disputed South China Sea amid trade tensions


February 11, 2019

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Two U.S. warships sailed near islands claimed by China in the South China Sea on Monday, a U.S. official told Reuters, a move likely to anger Beijing at a time of tense relations between the world’s two biggest economies.

Beijing and Washington are locked in a trade war and the two sides are trying to hammer out a deal ahead of a March 1 deadline when U.S. tariffs on $200 billion worth of Chinese imports are scheduled to increase to 25 percent from 10 percent.

Related Coverage

China angered as U.S. navy ships enter South China Sea

Escalating tensions between the United States and China have cost both countries billions of dollars and roiled global financial markets.

The official, speaking on condition of anonymity, said the two guided-missile destroyers traveled within 12 nautical miles of Mischief Reef in the disputed Spratly Islands.

The operation was the latest attempt to counter what Washington sees as Beijing’s efforts to limit freedom of navigation in the strategic waters, where Chinese, Japanese and some Southeast Asian navies operate.

China claims almost all of the strategic South China Sea and frequently lambastes the United States and its allies over naval operations near Chinese-occupied islands.

China and the United States have repeatedly traded barbs in the past over what Washington says is Beijing’s militarization of the South China Sea by building military installations on artificial islands and reefs.

China defends its construction as necessary for self-defense and says it is the United States that is responsible for ratcheting up tensions in the region by sending warships and military planes close to islands Beijing claims.

Vietnam, the Philippines, Brunei, Malaysia, Indonesia and Taiwan have competing claims in the region.

Fears have grown in recent months that the U.S.-China trade dispute is just one element in a bilateral relationship that is fast cooling across the board, with top U.S. administration officials sharply criticizing Beijing for everything from human rights abuses to cyber espionage in the United States.

The two countries are also at odds over regional security, including Washington’s overtures to the self-ruled island of Taiwan, which China claims as its own.

Reporting by Idrees Ali and Mary Milliken; Editing by Peter Cooney

Source: Reuters “U.S. destroyers sail in disputed South China Sea amid trade tensions”

Note: This is Reuters’ report I post here for readers’ information. It does not mean that I agree or disagree with the report’ views.


China has ‘stern’ words with U.S. over ship in South China Sea


November 30, 2018

BEIJING (Reuters) – China said on Friday it had lodged “stern representations” with the United States after the U.S. Navy sailed a ship through the contested South China Sea, passing near islands claimed by China.

Tension between the two powers in disputed Asian waters comes as their relationship has between strained by a row over trade involving increasingly severe rounds of tariffs on billions of dollars worth of each other’s imports.

The U.S. guided-missile cruiser USS Chancellorsville sailed near the Paracel Islands on Monday to challenge China’s “excessive maritime claims”, the U.S. Pacific fleet said in a statement.

China foreign ministry spokesman, Geng Shuang, told a daily news briefing the U.S. ship had entered Chinese waters without permission and China had made its position known with its “stern representations”.

The Chinese army said it had sent ships and planes to watch the U.S. ship and to warn it to leave.

The Chancellorsville’s voyage was the latest in what the United States calls freedom of navigation operations aimed at challenging what it sees as Chinese activity limiting freedom of movement in the strategic waters.

In particular, the United States has criticized China’s construction of islands on tiny reefs and shoals and its installation of military facilities on them, including air strips and docks.

China claims “irrefutable” sovereignty over most of the South China Sea and the islands in it, and accuses the United States of raising military tension with its navy presence there.

Brunei, Malaysia, the Philippines and Vietnam all claim parts of the waterway, through which about $5 trillion in ship-borne trade passes each year. Taiwan also claims the waters.

(This version of the story was refiled to remove extraneous word “said” from paragraph one)

Reporting by Christian Shepherd; Editing by Robert Birsel

Source: Reuters “China has ‘stern’ words with U.S. over ship in South China Sea”

Note: This is Reuters’ report I post here for readers’ information. It does not mean that I agree or disagree with the report’ views.


China condemns US for South China Sea freedom of navigation operation


October 2, 2018

BEIJING (Reuters) – China expressed anger on Tuesday after a U.S. Navy destroyer sailed near islands claimed by China in the disputed South China Sea, saying it resolutely opposed an operation that it called a threat to its sovereignty.

Beijing and Washington are locked in a trade war in which they have imposed increasingly severe rounds of tariffs on each other’s imports.

A U.S. official, speaking on condition of anonymity, said the destroyer the USS Decatur traveled within 12 nautical miles of Gaven and Johnson Reefs in the Spratly Islands on Sunday.

The operation was the latest attempt to counter what Washington sees as Beijing’s efforts to limit freedom of navigation in the strategic waters, where Chinese, Japanese and some Southeast Asian navies operate.

China’s Defence Ministry said a Chinese naval ship had been sent to warn the U.S. vessel to leave.

The ministry said China has irrefutable sovereignty over the South China Sea islands and the waters around them, and the situation there is progressing well thanks to the hard work of China and countries in Southeast Asia.

“The U.S. side repeatedly sends military ships without permission into seas close to South China Seas islands, seriously threatening China’s sovereignty and security, seriously damaging Sino-U.S. military ties and seriously harming regional peace and stability,” the ministry said.

“China’s military is resolutely opposed to this,” it said.

The Chinese armed forces will continue to take all necessary steps to protect the country’s sovereignty and security, the ministry said.

China’s Foreign Ministry said in a separate statement it strongly urged the United States to stop such “provocative” actions and to “immediately correct its mistakes”.

The operation also comes as military ties between the two countries have dived, with China also angered by U.S. sanctions on China’s military for buying Russian arms and by U.S. support for self-ruled Taiwan, which Beijing claims as its own.

U.S. Defense Secretary Jim Mattis said on Monday he did not see relations between the United States and China worsening, a day after his trip to China was canceled.

Reuters reported on Sunday that China canceled a security meeting with Mattis that had been planned for October. A U.S. official, speaking on the condition of anonymity, said Mattis was no longer going to China.

China has not yet commented on the matter.

Chinese Defence Minister Wei Fenghe is due to visit the United States later this year but China’s Defence Ministry suggested last week that may not happen.

Reporting by Ben Blanchard; Additional reporting by David Stanway in SHANGHAI; Editing by Paul Tait

Source: Reuters “China condemns US for South China Sea freedom of navigation operation”

Note: This is Reuters’ report I post here for readers’ information. It does not mean that I agree or disagree with the report’ views.


US Intensifies Naval Challenge by Sailing 2 Warships into Chinese Waters


Reuters says in its report, “Exclusive: U.S. warships sail near South China Sea islands claimed by Beijing” that two warships sailed into Chinese territorial waters around China’s Xisha (also known as Paracel) Islands.

The report was confirmed by China’s official protest on US naval move.

When China has landed bombers on its islands, Pentagon said there would be consequence. True enough it soon uninvited China from a major U.S.-hosted naval drill and intensified its freedom of navigation into Chinese territorial waters by sending two warships instead one in all the previous US freedom of navigation operations to challenge China .

There will be consequences too. China will intensify its militarization of its artificial islands with US help as US move gives China the excuse to do so for “defense”.

The US is satisfied with the move as it shows its naval presence in the South China Sea while China though protested, is pleased to have the excuse it needs to militarize its artificial islands to turn the sea into its lake.

There seems to be tension there, but we can rest at ease there will be no war especially when China has militarized the artificial islands to obtain superior geographical advantages in the sea. Otherwise, why shall China have incurred billions of dollars costs in building the islands in the first place? I shall say there is wonderful cooperation between the US and China in the South China Sea whether there is intention of such cooperation is another question quite irrelevant?

Comment by Chan Kai Yee on Reuters’ report, full text of which can be viewed at https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-china-military-exclusive/exclusive-u-s-warships-sail-near-south-china-sea-islands-claimed-by-beijing-idUSKCN1IS07W.


The US Willfully Plays into China’s Hands by Its FON Operations


Reuters says in it report “China condemns U.S. navy operation in South China Sea” yesterday that US destroyer conducted a “freedom of navigation” operation in South China Sea. Chinese ministry of defense responded by stating that the operation will only cause the Chinese military to strengthen its defense capabilities, which certainly include militarization of China’s artificial islands.

The US certainly is aware that in spite of its opposition China will militarize the islands otherwise it will be meaningless to spend billions of dollars to build the islands. However, it has to conduct few and far between freedom of navigation operations to show that it maintains its presence in the South China Sea. That is the reason for me to say that the US willfully plays into China’s hands.

The US knows well that the operations may not encourage contending claimants to challenge China as US pivot to China did at its beginning, but it has to maintain its presence to safe face.

China is certainly not so stupid as to fight a war to ban such operations, but it needs the excuse for militarization of the islands as it has declared that the islands are not built for military purpose.

As usual the conflicts between giant nations make small nations suffer. The militarization will scare contending claimants and leave them with no choice but to be friendly with China.

US containment and challenges almost always benefit China:

US containment of China facilitates the establishment of de facto alliance between China and Russia;

US pressure on China to devalue its currency taught China to internationalize its currency;

US threat of trade war has caused China to squander its foreign exchange to implement its Belt and Road initiative to expand the market for Chinese goods elsewhere; etc. etc.

We can foresee, China will reduce its holding of US treasury bonds and squander the proceeds in investment in Asia, Africa and Latin America for its economic expansion.

The US is pursuing isolation while China is pursuing economic expansion. That will be the long-tern consequence of a trade war between the US and China.

Comment by Chan Kai Yee on Reuters’ report, full text of which can be viewed at https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-china-southchinasea-ministry/china-condemns-u-s-navy-operation-in-south-china-sea-idUSKBN1GZ1HE.


British defense secretary says warship bound for South China Sea: media


Reuters Staff February 13, 2018

SYDNEY (Reuters) – A British warship will sail through the South China Sea next month to assert freedom-of-navigation rights, British Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson said in remarks published on Tuesday.

FILE PHOTO – Britain’s Secretary of State for Defence Gavin Williamson arrives in Downing Street in London, Britain, February 8, 2018. REUTERS/Peter Nicholls

British officials first flagged the voyage six months ago and the journey is likely to stoke tensions with China, who claim control of most of the area and have built military facilities on land features in the sea. Brunei, Malaysia, the Philippines, Taiwan and Vietnam also have claims to the energy-rich sea that carries billion of dollars in trade.

The frigate HMS Sutherland will sail through the region after a visit to Australia, Williamson said in an interview with The Australian newspaper.

“She’ll be sailing through the South China Sea (on the way home) and making it clear our navy has a right to do that,” he said, according to the newspaper.

Williamson did not specify whether it would sail within 12 nautical miles of any disputed territory, according to the paper. Several U.S. Navy ships have made their own freedom-of-navigation journeys that drew stern rebukes from Beijing.

Speaking in Beijing, Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Geng Shuang said he was aware of the comments.

“All countries in accordance with international law enjoy freedom of navigation and overflight in the South China Sea. There is no disagreement on this,” Geng said.

“The situation on the South China Sea is also improving with each day. We hope all relevant sides especially those outside the region can respect the efforts made by regional countries,” he added.

“Like I said last week, currently the South China Sea is calm and tranquil and we hope relevant sides don’t try to create trouble out of nothing.”

In the interview, Williamson also encouraged Australia to “do more” in a region where it has conducted surveillance flights, but not freedom-of-navigation voyages of its own.

“The U.S. is looking for other countries to do more. This is a great opportunity for the UK and Australia to do more, to exercise leadership,” he said.

China’s construction of islands and military facilities in the South China Sea has prompted international condemnation, amid concern Beijing is seeking to restrict free movement and extend its strategic reach.

The Association of South East Asian Nations is hoping to expedite negotiations with China on a code of conduct for the South China Sea, Singapore’s defense minister said last week.

However, the initial talks have failed to reach a consensus on making the code binding which has already raised concerns as to its effectiveness.

Reporting by Tom Westbrook; Additional reporting by Philip Wen in BEIJING; Editing by Christian Schmollinger

Source: Reuters “British defense secretary says warship bound for South China Sea: media”

Note: This is Reuters’ report I post here for readers’ information. It does not mean that I agree or disagree with the report’ views.