‘Get used to it’ China says as it flies bombers near Japan


BEIJING (Reuters) – China told Japan on Friday to “get used to it” after it flew six warplanes over the Miyako Strait between two southern Japanese islands in a military exercise.

Japan’s defense ministry issued a statement late on Thursday describing the flyover by the formation of Xian H-6 bombers earlier that day as “unusual”, while noting that there had been no violation of Japanese airspace.

The Chinese navy and air force have in recent months carried out a series of exercises in the Western Pacific, as they hone their ability to operate far from their home shores.

The Chinese defense ministry said it was “legal and proper” for its military aircraft to operate in the airspace and that it would continue to organize regular training exercises according to “mission requirements”.

“The relevant side should not make a fuss about nothing or over-interpret, it will be fine once they get used to it,” the ministry said in a statement.

The Miyako Strait is between Japan’s islands of Miyako and Okinawa, to the northeast of self-ruled Taiwan, which China claims as its own.

Taiwan’s Ministry of National Defense said on Thursday the Chinese bombers flew just outside its air defense identification zone and that it had “closely followed” the movements.

Reporting by Philip Wen; Additional reporting by Linda Seig in Tokyo

Source: Reuters “’Get used to it’ China says as it flies bombers near Japan”

Note: This is Reuters’ report I post here for readers’ information. It does not mean that I agree or disagree with the report’ views.


China’s Coast Guard Fleet Patrols Close around Disputed Islands with Japan


Mil.huanqiu.com says in its report on July 10 that China’s coast guard fleet consisting of Coast Guard Ships nos. 2307, 2502, 2166 and 2302 patrolled the territorial waters for two consecutive days from July 9 to 10.

Japan protested as usual but China repeated its reply as usual that the disputed Diaoyu Islands belong to China and China was conducting patrols of its own territorial waters.

Source: mil.huanqiu.com “China’s coast guard fleet patrols China’s territorial waters around the Diaoyu Islands for two consecutive days” (summary by Chan Kai Yee based on the report in Chinese)


China’s Xi urges Japan to put aside ‘distractions’ in relations


Chinese President Xi Jinping is seen during a working session at the G20 leaders summit in Hamburg, Germany July 8, 2017. REUTERS/Wolfgang Rattay

Chinese President Xi Jinping urged Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe on Saturday to put aside “distractions” that have strained bilateral ties and warned that China was unwilling to compromise on Taiwan, state news agency Xinhua said.

Relations have been complicated for decades by the legacy of Japan’s wartime aggression.

Self-ruled Taiwan, which is claimed by China and was governed by Japan from 1895-1945, is another sensitive issue, and a maritime territorial dispute over small islands in the East China Sea has deepened mutual suspicion in recent years.

Beijing complained to Tokyo in March after a Japanese minister visited Taiwan, and China has also told Japan not to get involved in the dispute over the South China Sea.

Meeting on the sidelines of the G20 summit in the German city of Hamburg, Xi told Abe the countries were important neighbors, and said the healthy development of relations was of importance to the rest of the world, Xinhua said.

Xi urged Japan to learn from history so as to have a “better future” in its ties with China, the report added.

“Noting that the China-Japan ties have been distracted by complicated factors despite some positive exchanges between the two sides, the Chinese leader said there is no room for compromise on the issues related to history and Taiwan, and Japan shall honor its words in these respects,” Xinhua said.

Adding to long-standing tensions, China said last month a Japanese citizen was being investigated for harming national security, following a similar case in May in which China said six Japanese were being questioned on suspicion of illegal activity.

(Reporting by Ben Blanchard; Editing by Helen Popper)

Source: Reuters “China’s Xi urges Japan to put aside ‘distractions’ in relations”

Note: This is Reuters’ report I post here for readers’ information. It does not mean that I agree or disagree with the report’ views.


Japan, South Korea, U.S. demand greater Chinese effort on N.Korea


North Korean leader Kim Jong Un reacts with scientists and technicians of the DPRK Academy of Defence Science after the test-launch of the intercontinental ballistic missile Hwasong-14 in this undated photo released by North Korea’s Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) in Pyongyang July, 5, 2017. KCNA/via REUTERS

Japan, the United States and South Korea agreed on Thursday to push for China to play a larger role in reining in North Korea’s nuclear ambitions, a Japanese official said on the eve of a summit of the Group of 20 economic powers.

North Korea’s launch this week of what it said was a nuclear-capable intercontinental ballistic missile dramatically raised the stakes in the long-running battle to contain the isolated country’s nuclear weapons program.

“North Korea now constitutes a new level of threat to Japan and a clear provocation to Japan and also to the international community,” said Norio Maruyama, Japanese foreign ministry spokesman, after a meeting of the three countries’ leaders.

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, U.S. President Donald Trump and South Korean President Moon Jae-In agreed at the meeting to cooperate closely to encourage China to “play an even greater role” in containing its southern neighbor.

“We had very vivid conversation on the subject and the role of China was very important” during the 75-minute meeting, Maruyama said, adding that Japan was closely monitoring Chinese companies it suspected of having links to North Korea’s weapons program.
“Abe conveyed Japan’s appreciation for the sanctions the U.S. decided to impose on Chinese organizations,” he said. “The Japanese government has been monitoring the movements of Chinese companies with deep ties to North Korea and responding appropriately” by imposing asset freezes.

Asked whether any military action was discussed, he said: “There is no discussion about the specificity of other measures we could take”.

(Reporting by Thomas Escritt and Paul Carrel; Editing by James Dalgleish)

Source: Reuters “Japan, South Korea, U.S. demand greater Chinese effort on N.Korea”

Note: This is Reuters’ report I post here for readers’ information. It does not mean that I agree or disagree with the report’ views.


Russia and China tell North Korea, U.S. and South Korea to embrace de-escalation plan


Russian President Vladimir Putin (R) and his Chinese counterpart Xi Jinping walk past honour guards during a meeting at the Kremlin in Moscow, Russia July 4, 2017. Sputnik/Mikhail Klimentyev/Kremlin via REUTERS

Russia and China joined diplomatic forces on Tuesday and called on North Korea, South Korea and the United States to sign up to a Chinese de-escalation plan designed to defuse tensions around Pyongyang’s missile program.

The plan would see North Korea suspend its ballistic missile program and the United States and South Korea simultaneously call a moratorium on large-scale missile exercises, both moves aimed at paving the way for multilateral talks.

The initiative was set out in a joint statement from the Russian and Chinese foreign ministries issued shortly after President Vladimir Putin and Chinese President Xi Jinping held wide-ranging talks in the Kremlin.

“The situation in the region affects the national interests of both countries,” the joint statement said. “Russia and China will work in close coordination to advance a solution to the complex problem of the Korean Peninsula in every possible way.”

North Korea said on Tuesday it had successfully test-fired an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) for the first time, which flew a trajectory that experts said could allow a weapon to hit the U.S. state of Alaska.

Russia and China both share a land border with North Korea and have been involved in past efforts to try to calm tensions between Pyongyang and the West.

Moscow and Beijing used the same joint declaration to call on Washington to immediately halt deployment of its THAAD anti-missile system in South Korea, a move Washington says is necessitated by the North Korean missile threat.

The statement said Washington was using North Korea as a pretext to expand its military infrastructure in Asia and risked upsetting the strategic balance of power in the area.

“The deployment … of THAAD will cause serious harm to the strategic security interests of regional states, including Russia and China,” the statement said.

“Russia and China oppose the deployment of such systems and call on the relevant countries to immediately halt and cancel the process of deployment.”

(Reporting by Denis Dyomkin/Vladimir Soldatkin/Dmitry Solovyov; Editing by Andrew Osborn)

Source: Reuters “Russia and China tell North Korea, U.S. and South Korea to embrace de-escalation plan”

Note: This is Reuters’ report I post here for readers’ information. It does not mean that I agree or disagree with the report’ views.


Despite Border Disputes, India Does Not Want to Upset China


FILE PHOTO: An E-2D Hawkeye plane approaches to the U.S. aircraft carrier John C. Stennis during joint military exercise called Malabar, with the United States, Japan and India participating, off Japan’s southernmost island of Okinawa, Japan June 15, 2016. REUTERS/Nobuhiro Kubo/File Photo

Reuters says in its report “India won’t include Australia in naval drills, fears China backlash”:

Australia formally wrote to the Indian defense ministry in January asking if it could send naval ships to join the July wargames as an observer, in what military experts saw as a step toward eventual full participation.

Four officials from India, Australia and Japan told Reuters India blocked the proposal and suggested that Canberra send officers to watch the exercises in the Bay of Bengal from the decks of the three participating countries’ warships, instead.

True, India worries that it may be encircled by China, Pakistan as well as Central Asia due to China’s growing influence in Central Asia and close ties with Russia, but it has joined China- and Russia-led Shanghai Cooperation Organization for win-win cooperation with China and Pakistan instead of provoking China.

Media exaggerate the recent border standoff between China and India as they need sensational news.

The border incident is in fact very small encounter that will never trigger a war as proved by decades of peace in spite of frequent encounters of such scale.

Anxious to encircle China, the US certainly is trying hard to attract India, but it lacks financial resources. Trump’s policies to bring jobs back to America will first of all deprive Indian elite the well-paid job opportunities in the US.

In addition, US trade policies are increasingly unfavourable to India’s export to the US.

Certainly, encircled by China and Pakistan, India wants US advanced weapons, but US weapons are too expensive. Is the US able to subsidize its weapon export to India to make India afford import of expensive US weapons?

Comment by Chan Kai Yee on Reuters’ report, full text of which can be viewed at http://www.reuters.com/article/us-india-navy-exercises-idUSKBN18Q1VD


Trump talks North Korea threat in calls with China, Japan leaders


FILE PHOTO: U.S. President Donald Trump and China’s President Xi Jinping chat as they walk along the front patio of the Mar-a-Lago estate after a bilateral meeting in Palm Beach, Florida, U.S., April 7, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

By Jeff Mason | BRIDGEWATER, N.J. Mon Jul 3, 2017 | 11:32am EDT

The threat posed by North Korea was a key topic in phone calls between U.S. President Donald Trump and the leaders of China and Japan, along with trade issues, the White House said on Sunday.

Trump spoke with Chinese President Xi Jinping and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe ahead of expected meetings with the leaders of Asia’s two biggest economies at a Group of 20 nations summit in Germany later this week.

“Both leaders reaffirmed their commitment to a denuclearized Korean Peninsula,” the White House said of Trump’s call with Xi from his resort property in Bridgewater, New Jersey, where he is spending a long weekend.

“President Trump reiterated his determination to seek more balanced trade relations with America’s trading partners,” it added.

Trump has become increasingly frustrated with China’s inability to rein in North Korea, and the reference to trade was an indication the one-time New York businessman may be ready to return to his tougher-talking ways on business with Beijing after holding back in hopes it would put more pressure on Pyongyang.

Trump and Xi discussed the “peace and stability of the Korean peninsula”, China’s Foreign Ministry said, without elaborating.

Ministry spokesman Geng Shuang later told a daily briefing that the United States was “very clear” about China’s position on North Korea. Geng did not elaborate on what Xi told Trump about North Korea.

“Negative factors” have affected Sino-U.S. relations, and China has already expressed its position to the United States, Xi told Trump, according to a read-out of a telephone call between the leaders carried by the ministry.

ONE CHINA POLICY

The ministry said Trump told Xi the U.S. government would continue to follow a “one China” policy, under which Washington acknowledges the Chinese position that there is only one China and Taiwan is part of it, and that this position had not changed.

China pays great attention to that reiteration and hopes the United States can “appropriately handle” the Taiwan issue, Xi told Trump, according to the ministry.

On Thursday, the United States targeted a Chinese bank and sanctioned Chinese individuals and a firm for dealing with North Korea and approved a $1.42 billion arms deal with Taiwan – decisions that angered Beijing.

And on Sunday a U.S. warship sailed near a disputed island in the South China Sea claimed by China, drawing a rebuke from the Chinese Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

Trump’s separate conversations with the two Asian leaders followed White House talks with South Korea’s new president, Moon Jae-in, last week in which the U.S. leader called on Asian powers to implement sanctions and demand North Korea “choose a better path and do it quickly.”

TRILATERAL SUMMIT

Trump and Abe, in their call, reiterated their commitment to increase pressure on North Korea.

“They reaffirmed that the United States-Japan Alliance stands ready to defend and respond to any threat or action taken by North Korea,” the White House said in a statement.

Japan’s Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga told a news conference the two countries and South Korea will have a trilateral summit at the G20 meeting, but he didn’t want to speculate on what might be said there.

“It’s important for these three nations to show their strong unity and cooperation both within and without,” Suga said. “Things such as strengthening pressure on North Korea or urging China to fulfill even more of a role. Things like this have been agreed on before as well.”

Trump, who held talks with Abe earlier this year at the president’s Mar-a-Lago resort in Florida, has forged a united front with the Japanese leader on the need to exert pressure on North Korea to curb its nuclear and missile development.

During and after a Florida summit with Xi in April at Mar-a-Lago, Trump praised his Chinese counterpart for agreeing to work on the North Korea issue and has held back on attacking Chinese trade practices he railed against during the presidential campaign.

But Trump has recently suggested he was running out of patience with China’s modest steps to pressure North Korea, which is working to develop a nuclear-tipped missile capable of hitting the United States, and has been considering moving ahead on trade actions.

Trump has been weighing new quotas or tariffs on steel imports for national security reasons and plans to discuss his concerns at the G20. Washington sees excess global production capacity, particularly in China, administration officials say.

(Reporting by Jeff Mason in New Jersey, Matt Spetalnick in Washington, Ben Blanchard in Beijing and Takaya Yamaguchi in Tokyo; Editing by Bill Tarrant)

Source: Reuters “Trump talks North Korea threat in calls with China, Japan leaders”

Note: This is Reuters’ report I post here for readers’ information. It does not mean that I agree or disagree with the report’ views.