Implied Criticisms in Words and Actions under Friendly First Lady diplomacy


Peng Liyuan shows Michelle Obama how to hold a writing brush as they visit a Chinese traditional calligraphy class at the Beijing Normal School. Photo: Reuters

Peng Liyuan shows Michelle Obama how to hold a writing brush as they visit a Chinese traditional calligraphy class at the Beijing Normal School. Photo: Reuters

It has been stressed that there is no politics in US first lady Michelle Obama’s China visit, but the arrangement of her last meal at a Tibetan restaurant gave China the message of US support for the Dalai Lama.

In return, Chinese first lady Peng Liyuan wrote four Chinese characters from a Chinese classic for the US first lady.

She gave the US the advice that only those with high virtues are able to bear great responsibilities, hinting that the US wants to bear the great responsibilities to be world leader but lacks the moral integrity to do so. It implies criticism of US bully of small and weaker countries in invading Iraq and Afghanistan, malpractices of tapping the telephone of not only common people but also foreign leaders, etc.

There were wars of words and implication in actions under friendly diplomacy.

Source: gggjs.com (3G Military) “US first lady visits China, unexpectedly get a lesson from the Chinese” (summary by Chan Kai Yee based on the report in Chinese)

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First ladies at the Forbidden City: Michelle Obama and Peng Liyuan kick off tour together


Michelle Obama tried her hand at calligraphy

Peng Liyuan shows Michelle Obama how to hold a writing brush as they visit a Chinese traditional calligraphy class at the Beijing Normal School. Photo: Reuters

Peng Liyuan shows Michelle Obama how to hold a writing brush as they visit a Chinese traditional calligraphy class at the Beijing Normal School. Photo: Reuters

US first lady Michelle Obama today kicked off her week-long trip to China with a stroll around Beijing’s Forbidden City and a visit to a school, accompanied by her Chinese counterpart Peng Liyuan.

Dressed casually in a sleeveless jacket, white shirt and wide-legged trousers, Michelle was pictured alongside Peng, who sported a more formal look, wearing a buttoned up navy blue jacket and skirt, a pair of high-heeled lace-up shoes, and carrying a red clutch bag.

First ladies Michelle Obama and Peng Liyuan pose for a photo at the Forbidden City. Photo: Reuters

First ladies Michelle Obama and Peng Liyuan pose for a photo at the Forbidden City. Photo: Reuters

The two first ladies arrived at a middle school in downtown Beijing’s Xicheng District amid tight security at 9.30am on Friday morning

The first ladies smiled broadly and shook hands on a red carpet in front of the school – their first ever meeting – as students around them waved flags.

Obama told Peng that it was “truly an honour and a privilege” to visit China with her family.

“It’s very rare that I have the opportunity to travel outside of the United States, and it’s even more rare to have the opportunity to travel with three  generations – with my daughters, and with my mother,” Obama said.

Peng said it was “a great delight” to meet her, saying: “In China, we have  an ancient idiom, which means when two people meet for the first time, they may feel as if they have known each other for many years.”

As they toured classrooms Obama tried her hand at calligraphy.

While she was given guidance by 16-year-old student Lu Yuhong in writing the Chinese character for “eternal”, Peng penned Chinese characters that read “a gentleman must embrace everything with virtue and tolerance”, before presenting them to her counterpart as a souvenir.

Before picking up her brush, Obama admitted, “I’m nervous”, to which Peng calmly replied in English, “Don’t be nervous”.

Michelle Obama tries to write Chinese words with a brush. Photo: Reuters

Michelle Obama tries to write Chinese words with a brush. Photo: Reuters

An impressed Lu said he had been “very excited” to meet Obama, adding she was “very approachable”.

Weibo bloggers quickly picked up on the phrase.

“Is she telling the States to be more noble?” wrote one, who identified himself as Futureengineer.

After a brief tour of the classrooms and gymnasium at the No.2 High School – a “sister school” to the Sidwell Friends School in Washington DC, attended by Obama’s daughters, Sasha and Malia – the group left and headed to the Forbidden City.

U.S. first lady Michelle Obama (C), her daughters Sasha (L) and Malia (2nd L) and her mother Marian Robinson (R) pose with Peng Liyuan, wife of Chinese President Xi Jinping, as they visit Forbidden City in Beijing March 21, 2014. Photo: Reuters

U.S. first lady Michelle Obama (C), her daughters Sasha (L) and Malia (2nd L) and her mother Marian Robinson (R) pose with Peng Liyuan, wife of Chinese President Xi Jinping, as they visit Forbidden City in Beijing March 21, 2014. Photo: Reuters

Their appearance quickly attracted the attention of tourists who whipped out their cameras and mobiles phones in an effort to capture images of the women together.

Peng is due to host a dinner for the Obamas later today.

The two women’s husbands, Barack Obama and Xi Jinping, are expected to meet next week on the sidelines of a nuclear security summit in the Netherlands.

The visit is Obama’s first to China, and her third foreign trip without the US commander-in-chief since moving into the White House.

The Obama family members arrived in Beijing yesterday to a buzz from Chinese internet users who commented on everything from her choice of outfit to details of her itinerary. The White House has insisted that her tour is more cultural than political.

Michelle Obama plays table tennis during her visit to Beijing. Photo: Reuters

Michelle Obama plays table tennis during her visit to Beijing. Photo: Reuters

During the Beijing leg of her tour Obama is staying at the presidential suite of The Westin hotel in Chaoyang District. the suite has a list price of 52,000 yuan a night (about HK$65,500).

Visiting on the invitation of Chinese first lady Peng Liyuan, Obama’s trip will focus on building cultural ties between the two nations and will avoid political topics.

Michelle Obama, her daughters Malia and Sasha, and Peng Liyuan, watch students demonstrating remote control mechanical robots at the Beijing Normal School. Photo: AP

Michelle Obama, her daughters Malia and Sasha, and Peng Liyuan, watch students demonstrating remote control mechanical robots at the Beijing Normal School. Photo: AP

Obama waved as she stepped out of the aircraft with her mother Marian Robinson, and daughters, at Beijing’s Capital International Airport last night, where they were welcomed by Assistant Foreign Minister Zhang Kunsheng.

Mainland internet users were quick to point out that Obama’s dress was designed by American Derek Lam, who has Chinese lineage.

The White House promised social media updates on her trip, but said Obama had no plans to give media interviews.

The visit “is an important opportunity not just to share China’s rich history and culture with young people like you, but to connect you with the stories of young people in China”, Obama said in a video ahead of the trip.

Michelle Obama and her daughters Sasha and Malia meet with Peng Liyuan as they pay a visit to Beijing Normal School. Photo: Reuters

Michelle Obama and her daughters Sasha and Malia meet with Peng Liyuan as they pay a visit to Beijing Normal School. Photo: Reuters

Foreign ministry spokesman Hong Lei said Obama’s visit could promote Sino-US friendship.

Tomorrow, Obama will deliver a speech at the Stanford Centre at Peking University, visit the Summer Palace, and meet with US embassy staff.

US first lady Michelle Obama (front left) disembarks from the plane upon her arrival in Beijing kicking off her seven-day visit to China. Photo: Xinhua

US first lady Michelle Obama (front left) disembarks from the plane upon her arrival in Beijing kicking off her seven-day visit to China. Photo: Xinhua

On Sunday, she will host a round-table discussion on education and visit the Great Wall, before heading west to Xian on Monday and Chengdu on Tuesday.

Mainland internet users were particularly interested in Obama’s plan to eat Tibetan food in Chengdu, Sichuan province, on Wednesday, the last day of her trip.

Some saw the stop as indicating Washington’s tacit support for Tibet’s exiled leader, the Dalai Lama. “Eating and drinking are also political,” wrote one blogger.

U.S. First Lady Michelle Obama (right) is greeted by Max Baucus (center) the new U.S. Ambassador to China, and his wife Melodee Hanes (left) upon her arrival at Capital International Airport in Beijing, China. Photo: AP

U.S. First Lady Michelle Obama (right) is greeted by Max Baucus (center) the new U.S. Ambassador to China, and his wife Melodee Hanes (left) upon her arrival at Capital International Airport in Beijing, China. Photo: AP

This is where Michelle stays in Beijing – the only presidential suite in The Westin hotel in Chaoyang District. The listed price for the suite is 52,000 yuan per night. Photo: CFP

This is where Michelle stays in Beijing – the only presidential suite in The Westin hotel in Chaoyang District. The listed price for the suite is 52,000 yuan per night. Photo: CFP

Source: SCMP “First ladies at the Forbidden City: Michelle Obama and Peng Liyuan kick off tour together”

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Traditional Chinese First Lady to Meat Typical Western Counterpart


Michelle Obama, front left, daughters Sasha, front right, and Malia, back right, and Michelle Obama's mother, Marian Robinson, back left, arrive at the airport in Beijing. Photo: AP

Michelle Obama, front left, daughters Sasha, front right, and Malia, back right, and Michelle Obama’s mother, Marian Robinson, back left, arrive at the airport in Beijing. Photo: AP

Michelle Obama’s dress and travel plans – and even what she will eat – scoured for meaning

US first lady Michelle Obama arrived in Beijing yesterday to buzz from Chinese internet users on anything from her choice of outfit to details of her itinerary, despite the White House insisting that her tour is more cultural than political.

Visiting on the invitation of Chinese first lady Peng Liyuan , Obama’s trip will focus on building cultural ties between the two nations and will avoid political topics.

Obama waved as she stepped out of the airplane with her mother, Marian Robinson, and daughters, Sasha and Malia, at Beijing’s Capital International Airport, where they were welcomed by Assistant Foreign Minister Zhang Kunsheng .

[The trip is an] opportunity … to share China’s rich history and culture

MICHELLE OBAMA

Mainland internet users were quick to point out that Obama’s dress was designed by American Derek Lam, who has Chinese lineage.

The White House promised social media updates about her trip, but Obama had no plans to give media interviews.

Today, the US first lady and Peng will visit the Beijing Normal School, which helps students prepare for study abroad. Peng will also take Obama to the Forbidden City and host a dinner in Obama’s honour.

The visit “is an important opportunity not just to share China’s rich history and culture with young people like you, but to connect you with the stories of young people in China”, Obama said in a video ahead of the trip.

Foreign ministry spokesman Hong Lei said Obama’s visit could promote Sino-US friendship.

Tomorrow, Obama will deliver a speech at the Stanford Centre at Peking University, visit the Summer Palace, and meet with US embassy staff. On Sunday, she will host a round-table discussion on education and visit the Great Wall, before heading west to Xian on Monday and Chengdu on Tuesday.

Mainland internet users were particularly interested in Obama’s plan to eat Tibetan food in Chengdu , Sichuan province, on the last day of her trip on Wednesday. Some saw the stop as indicating Washington’s tacit support for Tibet’s exiled leader, the Dalai Lama. “Eating and drinking are also political,” wrote one blogger.

Source: SCMP “No escaping politics as Michelle Obama arrives in Beijing for week-long visit”

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China’s ‘first lady’ Peng avoids California limelight


China's first lady Peng Liyuan (2nd L) takes a photograph as China's President Xi Jinping (2nd R) talks with his Mexican counterpart Enrique Pena Nieto during a visit at the archaeological site of Chichen Itza in the peninsula of Yucatan June 6, 2013.  Credit: Reuters/Victor Ruiz Garcia

China’s first lady Peng Liyuan (2nd L) takes a photograph as China’s President Xi Jinping (2nd R) talks with his Mexican counterpart Enrique Pena Nieto during a visit at the archaeological site of Chichen Itza in the peninsula of Yucatan June 6, 2013.
Credit: Reuters/Victor Ruiz Garcia

China’s photogenic “first lady” Peng Liyuan played steel drums in Trinidad, strolled hand-in-hand with a coffee farmer’s daughter in Costa Rica and snapped pictures with her iPhone in the shadow of Mayan ruins in Mexico.

But the glamorous and popular wife of Chinese President Xi Jinping stepped out of the spotlight for two days in California while her husband held unprecedented informal talks with U.S. President Barack Obama at a lush retreat in the desert on the last leg of a four-country trip.

Peng, a singer who many Chinese say was far more famous than Xi before he became a top leader, has decisively broken the mold of Chinese first wives who have kept an intentionally low profile since the 1970s.

Many in China expected to see more of her in California and hoped that she would have a chance to interact with U.S. First Lady Michelle Obama, potentially adding a fresh dimension to the nascent relationship between their presidential husbands.

But Mrs. Obama’s decision to stay in Washington with her daughters rather than meet the Chinese first couple sidelined Peng to some extent.

U.S. officials said it had been made clear to the Chinese side early on that a scheduling conflict would prevent Mrs. Obama from the summit at the Sunnylands estate near Palm   Springs.

But the U.S. first lady did make a gesture.

“Mrs. Obama wrote a letter to Madame Peng welcoming her to the United States. The First Lady said she regretted missing her this weekend but hopes to have the chance to visit China and meet Madame Peng sometime soon,” a White House official said.

Still, Michelle Obama’s absence set the Chinese blogosphere and some Chinese media outlets alight with speculation, anger, pride and more than a few jokes.

It was an “arrogant show of fear of inferiority” which caused Michelle Obama not to meet Peng, and an insult to the Chinese people, an opinion piece carried by the semi-official China News Service said. The article appeared to have later been removed from the service’s website but it was widely circulated on China’s Twitter-like Sina Weibo microblog.

‘DISRESPECT AND RUDENESS’

“Even if Xi’s wife doesn’t care, many Chinese believe this is a show of disrespect and rudeness towards the Chinese leader,” it said.

Michelle Obama has had cordial interactions with other foreign leaders’ wives who have visited the White House as well as with those she has met abroad. But lacking any major diplomatic role in the administration, she has shown few signs of forging close personal bonds with her foreign counterparts.

On Weibo, several commentators took their own stabs as to why Michelle avoided California.

“She was afraid of Mama Peng’s charm. How shameful that the aura of the First Lady of the world’s superpower can’t beat that of the First Lady of developing China,” wrote a user with the handle Chiki_Wang.

Another wrote: “Michelle decided to hide before being humbled. She was afraid that after dinner the two couples would sing karaoke and so she said she needed to be with her daughters – one of the most common excuses, even in China.”

Peng stepped into the limelight in her new role as first lady in March, the same month that Xi became president, when she accompanied him to Russia and Africa. She became an instant internet sensation back home.

Images of her wearing a fashionable, made-in-China wardrobe have been popular back home – a parallel she shares with Michelle Obama, who Vogue magazine said in its April cover story had “inspired a modern definition of effortless American chic.”

Chinese first wives have occasionally appeared in photographs when traveling abroad with their husbands. Most have appeared frumpy and awkward, though, and none of Peng’s predecessors stretching back to the founding of the People’s Republic of China in 1949 could be described as glamorous.

All have kept a low profile because of the experience of Jiang Qing, the widow of the founder of Communist China, Mao Zedong. Jiang was the leader of the “Gang of Four” that wielded supreme power during the 1966-76 Cultural Revolution. She was given a suspended death sentence in 1981 for the deaths of tens of thousands during that period of chaos.

By contrast, Peng’s easy, casual and fun demeanor were on full display once again on the earlier leg of Xi’s trip, which took in Trinidad, Costa Rica and Mexico. She has also been trying out her English, which sources with ties to the leadership told Reuters she has been learning.

In California, Palm Springs’ local newspaper, the Desert Sun, snapped photos of her visiting the Palm SpringsArt Museum on Friday afternoon. Almost no other media were present.

And Peng joined Obama and Xi for tea on Saturday before the Chinese first couple departed, U.S. national security adviser Thomas Donilon said. It lasted about a half hour.

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First lady Peng Liyuan and the photo that’s best forgotten


A computer shows a website displaying the photo of Peng Liyuan singing to martial law troops in Tiananmen Square. Photo: AP

A computer shows a website displaying the photo of Peng Liyuan singing to martial law troops in Tiananmen Square. Photo: AP

Picture of Peng Liyuan singing to troops after Tiananmen crackdown is scrubbed from web

A photo of new first lady Peng Liyuan in her younger days, singing to martial law troops after the 1989 military crackdown on pro-democracy protesters, flickered across cyberspace this week.

It was swiftly scrubbed from China’s internet before it could generate discussion online.

But the image – seen and shared by outside observers – revived a memory the leadership prefers to suppress and shows one of the challenges in presenting Peng on the world stage as the country’s softer side.

The leadership wants Peng to show the human side of President Xi Jinping, while not exposing too many perks of the elite. And it must balance popular support for the first couple with an acute wariness of personality cults that could skew the consensus rule among top party leaders.

The photo shows Peng wearing a green military uniform, her windswept hair tied back in a ponytail, as she sings to helmeted and rifle-bearing troops seated in rows in Tiananmen Square.

It contrasts with her appearances this week in trendy suits and coiffed hair while touring Russia and Africa with Xi.

Kelley Currie, a human rights expert for the pro-democracy Project 2049 Institute in Arlington, Virginia, said: “I think that we have a lot of people hoping that because Xi Jinping walks around without a tie on and his wife is a singer who travels with him on trips that maybe we’re dealing with a new kind of leader, but I think these images remind people that this is the same party.

“It’s using new tools and new techniques, for the same purposes – to preserve its own power.”

Peng, 50, a major general in the People’s Liberation Army best known for soaring renditions of patriotic odes to the military and the party, kept a low profile as her husband prepared to take over as party chief. Her re-emergence has been accompanied by a blaze of publicity in state-run media hailing her beauty and charm, in a bid to harness her popularity to build support for Xi at home and abroad.

“The photo probably has a negative impact more so internationally than domestically,” said Joseph Cheng, a political scientist at City University of Hong Kong.

He said more scrutiny of Peng is likely and such photos could raise questions about Xi’s interest in reforms.

He added: “It has been several months now that Xi Jinping has assumed the top leadership role and we have found no indicator that he is interested in this stage to push serious political reform.”

The image is a snapshot of the back cover of a 1989 issue of a publicly available military magazine PLA Pictorial, according to Sun Li, a reporter.

He said he took a photo of it on his cell phone several years ago when it was inadvertently posted on his microblog.

Sun said he quickly deleted it and had no idea how it resurfaced on the internet years later.

Warren Sun, a military historian at Monash University in Australia, had little doubt about the authenticity of the photo. He cited a 1992 academic report as saying that after the crackdown, Peng performed a song titled The Most Beloved People in a salute to the martial law troops.

In an indication of Peng’s appeal on the mainland, a man whose 19-year-old son was killed in the Tiananmen crackdown said he bears no grudges.

“If I had known about this back then, I would have been very disgusted by it. But now, looking at it objectively, it’s all in the past,” said Wang Fandi, whose son Wang Nan died from a bullet wound to his head.

“She was in the establishment. If the military wanted her to perform, she had to go.”

Source: SCMP “First lady Peng Liyuan and the photo that’s best forgotten”


China: First lady Peng Liyuan spurs boom in demand for home-grown labels


President Xi Jinping and his wife, Peng Liyuan, are welcomed to Tanzania by President Jakaya Mrisho Kikwete and his wife, Salma Kikwete. Photo: AP

President Xi Jinping and his wife, Peng Liyuan, are welcomed to Tanzania by President Jakaya Mrisho Kikwete and his wife, Salma Kikwete. Photo: AP

Peng Liyuan’s clothing choices abroad spurs demand for home-grown designers and labels

First lady Peng Liyuan’s choice of home-grown designer brands on her maiden overseas trip with President Xi Jinping has been hailed as a boon for China’s fashion industry, yearning for its own “Jason Wu moment”.

Wu is the Taiwanese-Canadian designer who shot to fame after US first lady Michelle Obama wore one of his designs.

Peng, 50, who is making her first public appearances in state visits to Russia and Africa, has become a fashion icon in China, as people flock to snap up coats, scarfs and handbags similar to those she has been seen wearing.

Images of her stepping off a plane with her husband in Moscow on Friday have circulated widely on the Chinese internet, prompting praise for her understated yet sophisticated style.

Stocks of mainland high-end clothing firms surged yesterday on the expectation that “the first-lady effect” would be big boost for the domestic fashion sector.

Eagle-eyed fashion-savvy bloggers identified the leather handbag and smart, double-breasted black trench coat she wore as items from Guangzhou-based label Exception. The brand has been described as one of China’s leading independent labels whose simple but unique designs stand out in an industry dominated by Western copycats.

“Big luxury brands in Europe or America are often the first choice for many rich Chinese consumers when they dress up,” said Hong Dongni, an adviser with Golden Wisdom Fashion Brands Management Consulting Centre in Beijing.

“But I believe top local fashion brands will draw much more attention among buyers at home in the future after Peng showed her elegance and confidence in wearing home-grown labels.

“Peng’s exposure has greatly raised the profile of local brands, just like what US first lady Michelle Obama did for designer Jason Wu.”

Exception was founded in Guangzhou by Mao Jihong and Ma Ke in 1996, as confirmed by Guangzhou’s Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine last Friday. It has 60 shops across the country.

During the past few days, the trench coat and leather handbag worn by the first lady when she arrived in Moscow are the most sought-after items in the stores.

In a Beijing branch of Exception, customers keep asking for items Peng had worn. “What Ms Peng wore is supposed to be tailor-made for her. Now we only have some similar collections,” the saleswoman said.

In an Exception store in Chengdu, sales staff said all the handbags in a similar style had sold out and the company needed to deliver more goods from Guangzhou to meet demand, local media Sichuan Online reported. Handbags in the store are priced at 5,000 yuan (HK$6,200) each.

The “first-lady effect” drove up the share price of other domestic clothing brands yesterday. High-end labels such as women’s wear firm Lancy Company and suits brand Trands both rose 10 per cent in Shenzhen and Shanghai trading respectively, while leather goods maker Kaiser (China) Holdings increased more than 3 per cent in Shenzhen.

Commentators in China’s fashion world are celebrating. “It’s the first time China’s first lady appears like a modern woman. She dresses very well, with taste and confidence,” said Zhang Yu, editor of China’s Vogue magazine. “After so many years, we finally have a first lady who can represent us so appropriately. It is a landmark event.”

Source: SCMP “First lady Peng Liyuan spurs boom in demand for home-grown labels”


China’s glamorous new first lady an instant internet hit


Chinese President Xi Jinping (L) and First Lady Peng Liyuan wave as they disembark from a plane upon their arrival at Moscow's Vnukovo airport March 22, 2013.  Credit: Reuters/Maxim Shemetov

Chinese President Xi Jinping (L) and First Lady Peng Liyuan wave as they disembark from a plane upon their arrival at Moscow’s Vnukovo airport March 22, 2013.
Credit: Reuters/Maxim Shemetov

First lady Peng Liyuan

First lady Peng Liyuan

With a smile on her face, dressed in a simple black peacoat and carrying an elegant unbranded bag, China’s new first lady, Peng Liyuan, stepped into the international limelight on Friday and became an instant internet sensation back home.

Stepping off the aircraft in Moscow – the first stop of President Xi Jinping’s maiden foreign trip since assuming office – Peng’s glamorous appearance and obvious affection for her portly husband caused Chinese microbloggers to swoon.

“So beautiful, Peng Liyuan, so beautiful! How composed, how magnanimous,” wrote one user on China’s popular Twitter-like service Sina Weibo.

“Who could not love such a lady as this and be insanely happy with her?” wrote another.

Taobao, an online shopping site similar to eBay and Amazon, quickly began offering for sale coats in the same style of Peng’s, advertising it as “the same style as the first lady’s”.

Others wondered what brand her bag and shoes were.

“Her shoes are really classic, and who designed her bag?” wrote a third Weibo user.

Peng is best known in China as a singer, and for many years was arguably better known and certainly more popular than her husband.

People who have met her and know her say that Peng is vivacious and fun to be around, though she was ordered to take a back seat after Xi became vice president in 2008 as he was being groomed for state power.

But she is expected to be given high-profile events of her own to attend on Xi’s sweep through Russia, Tanzania, South Africa and the Republic of Congo on a week-long trip, as the government tries to soften the image of China abroad.

Peng has won praise for her advocacy for pet causes, most notably for children living with HIV/AIDS, and may visit charities related to this while abroad.

Unlike the baby-kissing politicians of the West, China’s Communist Party works hard to keep its top leaders from appearing too human – to the point that for many, even their official birthdates and the names of their children are regarded as a state secret.

Xi and Peng are different. Their romance has been the subject of dozens of glowing reports and pictorials in state media.

“When he comes home, I’ve never thought of it as though there’s some leader in the house. In my eyes, he’s just my husband,” Peng gushed in an interview with a state-run magazine in 2007, describing Xi as frugal, hardworking and down-to-earth.

Peng is Xi’s second wife, and the two have a daughter studying at Harvard under an assumed name. Xi divorced his first wife, the daughter of a diplomat.

Chinese first wives have traditionally kept a low profile over the past few decades, because of the experience of Jiang Qing, the widow of the founder of Communist China, Mao Zedong.

Jiang was the leader of the “Gang of Four” that wielded supreme power during the 1966-76 Cultural Revolution. She was given a suspended death sentence in 1981 for the deaths of tens of thousands during that period of chaos.

Source: Reuters “China’s glamorous new first lady an instant internet hit”

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