J-20 stealth fighter in service for 2nd PLA ace force with home developed engines


By Liu XuanzunPublished: Jun 18, 2021 06:36 PM   

China | PLA air force
China | PLA air force

J-20, homegrown engine,

China's J-20 stealth fighter jet displays its new coating of stealth material and flies over the exhibition hall at Airshow China 2018 on Tuesday. Photo: Cui Meng/GT

China’s J-20 stealth fighter jet displays its new coating of stealth material and flies over the exhibition hall at Airshow China 2018 on Tuesday. Photo: Cui Meng/GT

The Chinese People’s Liberation Army (PLA) Air Force has equipped a second ace force with the country’s most advanced fighter jet, the J-20, as the unit made its debut with the new warplanes in Northeast China on Friday.

Report footage shows that these J-20s are equipped with domestically developed engines, observers said.

The Military Development Vanguard Air Group, which originated from the Communist Party of China’s (CPC) first ever aviation combat force and made glories in the War to Resist US Aggression and Aid Korea (1950-53) and homeland air defense missions by shooting down 92 hostile aircraft, is now equipped with J-20 fighter jets, China Central Television (CCTV) reported on Friday, citing a PLA Air Force spokesperson.

On Friday, the J-20s from the unit delivered an aerial performance together with other fighter jets including J-16s and J-10s during a PLA Air Force event celebrating the 100th anniversary of the founding of the CPC at the former site of the old Northeast China Aviation School, CCTV reported.

“My unit is now flying the most advanced domestically developed warplanes, and we will practice hard to make the best of them, hone our confidence and determination to fight and win, and live up to the expectations by the Party and people,” Shi Yunjia, a J-20 pilot, said in the report.

This is the second ace force in the PLA Air Force that has been equipped with the country’s most advanced fighter jet. In October 2019, the service announced that the J-20 was commissioned into the Wang Hai Air Group, a heroic combat force that has downed 59 enemy aircraft and named after Wang Hai, a flying ace in the Korean War.

Advanced warplanes will be commissioned amongst more units in the PLA Air Force, as the service’s development in the new era requires more heroic forces, Wang Mingzhi, a PLA Air Force military expert, was quoted as saying.

Heroic forces must be vanguards and they should also be handed the best aircraft, Wang said.

Observers pointed out that the J-20s featured in the report footages are seemingly equipped with domestically developed WS-10 engines.

This is not the first time the PLA Air Force has confirmed that a J-20 equipped with a domestically made engine has entered service. Back in January, the PLA Air Force released a video for its pilot recruitment program, and media outlets identified a J-20 that is equipped with domestically developed WS-10C engines instead of imported Russian engines.

More J-20s entering service with the PLA Air Force and their equipment of domestically developed engines indicate that the J-20 is becoming more and more technically mature and has started mass production, a military expert told the Global Times on Friday, requesting anonymity.

More PLA units based in different locations across the country are expected to get more J-20s, significantly enhancing the PLA Air Force’s capability of safeguarding the motherland’s sovereignty, airspace and development interests, the expert said.

The J-20 made its first test flight in 2011, its debut at Airshow China 2016 and entered military service in 2017.

Source: Global Times “J-20 stealth fighter in service for 2nd PLA ace force with home developed engines”

Note: This is Global Times’ report I post here for readers’ information. It does not mean whether I agree or disagree with the report’s views.


Test pilot sees China’s J-20 to get 2D thrust vectoring nozzles


By Liu Xuanzun

Published: Apr 19, 2021 10:43 PM

China’s J-20 stealth fighter jet displays its new coating of stealth material and flies over the exhibition hall at Airshow China 2018 on Tuesday. Photo: Cui Meng/GT

The pilot who first flew the J-20 believes that China’s most advanced stealth fighter jet will be upgraded with 2D thrust vectoring nozzles for its engines, according to a recent news report.

This means the warplane will receive enhanced maneuverability and stealth capability and surpass its US counterpart, the F-22, a Chinese military expert said on Monday.

The J-20 is expected to be equipped with engines with 2D thrust vectoring nozzles, said Li Gang, the pilot of the J-20’s first flight, when asked about his expectations on the future development of the J-20’s thrust vector control capability in a recent interview with Hong Kong-based Phoenix TV aired on Monday.

J-20s in service with the People’s Liberation Army (PLA) Air Force currently all use circular nozzles with no thrust vector control capability, analysts said.

Thrust vector control will provide extra maneuverability and 2D nozzles can enhance stealth capabilities of the J-20, Fu Qianshao, a Chinese military aviation expert, told the Global Times on Monday.

With the flight performance of the J-10B thrust vector control demonstrator at the Airshow China 2018 in Zhuhai, South China’s Guangdong Province, China displayed its capability to develop and apply 3D thrust vectoring technology on fighter jets.

Explaining the differences between 2D and 3D thrust vectoring, Fu said that 2D nozzles are rectangular and 3D nozzles are circular, meaning that 2D nozzles have better radar and infrared stealth capabilities than the 3D nozzles.

The F-22 stealth fighter jet of the US Air Force uses 2D thrust vectoring, analysts noted.

3D nozzles are often believed to be capable of providing more thrust angles than 2D nozzles, as F-22’s 2D nozzles can only move vertically, but this is a common misunderstanding, Fu said, noting that 2D nozzles can also move horizontally to provide horizontal thrust when so designed, but this design could add development costs.

In the Phoenix TV report, Li also said that he expects the J-20’s thrust vectoring nozzles to move only vertically like the F-22, but Fu said that he hopes the J-20’s future nozzles will be able to move horizontally, which will make the PLA fighter jet surpass its US counterpart in this aspect.

It has been long expected that the J-20 will eventually receive thrust vectoring-capable engines.

When asked about when the J-20 can get thrust vectoring-capable engines at a press conference of Airshow China 2018, shortly after the J-10B thrust vector control demonstrator made its flight performance, Yang Wei, chief designer of the J-20, replied, “You asked about when, but how do you know it hasn’t?” This statement is widely interpreted by military observers that the J-20’s developers have been testing thrust vector control on the aircraft for a long time.

2021 marks the 10th year of the J-20’s maiden flight, and the stealth fighter jet is seeing many new developments, including domestically made engines, removal of Luneburg lens in exercises, and possible development of a twin-seat variation, according to media reports.

Source: Global Times “Test pilot sees China’s J-20 to get 2D thrust vectoring nozzles”

Note: This is Global Times’ report I post here for readers’ information. It does not mean whether I agree or disagree with the report’ views.


China’s J-20 stealth fighter jet flies without Luneburg lens, shows combat readiness


By Liu Xuanzun

Published: Apr 05, 2021 08:09 PM

A J-20 stealth fighter jet attached to the Chinese People’s Liberation Army Eastern Theater Command takes part in exercises. The aircraft is not equipped with a Luneburg lens, a radar reflector used to make a stealth aircraft visible to others in training or non-combat flights. Photo: Screenshot from China Central Television

A J-20 stealth fighter jet attached to the Chinese People’s Liberation Army Eastern Theater Command takes part in exercises. The aircraft is not equipped with a Luneburg lens, a radar reflector used to make a stealth aircraft visible to others in training or non-combat flights. Photo: Screenshot from China Central Television

The J-20, the most advanced, stealth-capable fighter jet of the Chinese People’s Liberation Army (PLA) Air Force, has entered the next level of combat readiness, analysts said on Monday, after the aircraft was spotted flying without a Luneburg lens, a small device used to intentionally expose a stealth aircraft to others in situations like training or non-combat flights.

At the Qingming Festival on Sunday, the traditional tomb-sweeping day, pilots of J-20 jets paid respect to the heroic Chinese pilots who fought in the Korean War (1950-53), China Central Television (CCTV) reported on Sunday.

The former unit of Sun Shenglu, a heroic Chinese pilot in the war, is now equipped with J-20 fighter jets, Sun Teng, a J-20 fighter jet pilot, said on CCTV.

Sun Shenglu was part of the Wang Hai Air Group, which is now affiliated with the PLA Eastern Theater Command, according to openly available information. The PLA Air Force announced in 2019 that the Wang Hai Air Group was equipped with the J-20.

“Air Force pilots in the new age will inherit the spirit of ‘aerial bayonet fighting,’ train to prepare for combat, be ready at all times for combat, and resolutely safeguard national sovereignty and dignity,” Sun Teng said.

The CCTV footage also showed a J-20 making aerial maneuvers, and some frames showed that this J-20 was not equipped with a Luneburg lens. Further, the lines of the aircraft’s side missile bay were different from previous J-20 fighters, a separate report by CCTV said on Monday,

A Luneburg lens is a small device used to expand the radar cross-section of an aircraft, which means it can make a stealth aircraft visible to radar, a Chinese military expert who asked to remain anonymous told the Global Times on Monday.

In regular training, friendly radar facilities need to track stealth aircraft to monitor their activities and assess training results. In other non-combat scenarios like transit flights, making the presence of stealth aircraft known to others can avoid accidents, the expert said, noting that in some military operations, there could also be a need for such planes to show themselves to achieve deterrence while also hiding their true stealth specifications.

In most previous reports on the J-20, the stealth aircraft shown carried this radar reflector under its belly, military affairs observers said.

By removing it, the J-20 will go stealth as it was designed to, and this means it is engaged in a real combat scenario-oriented mission, the expert said, noting that the J-20 has entered the next level of combat readiness.

Source: Global Times “China’s J-20 stealth fighter jet flies without Luneburg lens, shows combat readiness”

Note: This is Global Times’ article I post here for readers’ information. It does not mean whether I agree or disagree with the article’s views.


China’s J-16 fighter jet is flawless and much superior to the Su-30: pilot


By Liu Xuanzun

Published: Mar 25, 2021 02:01 AM

A J-16 fighter jet attached to an aviation brigade of the air force under the PLA Eastern Theater Command soars into the sky during multiple training sorties on February 16, 2021. (eng.chinamil.com.cn/Photo by Li Yehong)

China’s J-16 multi-role fighter jet is flawless and is much superior to other similar aircraft including, the Su-30, revealed a pilot who has experience flying it as well as other types of aircraft.

The J-16 has been a frequent flyer near the Taiwan Straits and has also been deployed to safeguard China’s western borders. Analysts said on Wednesday that the fighter jet is one of China’s core elements of air defense forces.

“In terms of performance, the J-16 is a superior to all types of aircraft I have flown. Speaking of the control capacity of the aircraft, the J-16 is a 3.5 generation plane with huge breakthroughs in radar and fire control systems in comparison with previous aircraft, said Wang Songxi, a flying instructor at the People’s Liberation Army Northern Theater Command Air Force, during an interview with China Central Television (CCTV) on Tuesday.

The J-16 has no flaws, because it is equipped with many types of weapons and can operate under all weather conditions, Wang said.

Explaining the strong combat capabilities of the J-16, Wang drew some comparisons with other well-known aircraft.

Normal people usually can’t tell the difference between a J-16 and a Su-30 from their appearance, but many things are difference from the inside, Wang said, noting that there is a gap that makes the J-16 a generation more advanced than the Su-30.

Recalling a training dogfight with China’s other 3.5 generation fighter jet, the J-10C, in 2020, Wang said that the J-16 and the J-10C had to call it a draw, but Wang felt that the J-16 had the upper hand because it has two engines and two pilots, while the J-10C only has one engine and one pilot.

Wang said he once had a chance to fly the JL-10 trainer jet and conduct ground attack exercise with rocket projectiles with remarkable results. When compared with the JL-10, the J-16’s land attack capability is even stronger, Wang said.

The J-16 has also been improved for better stealth capability, as Jiang Jiaji, the first pilot to win the PLA’s Golden Helmet competition three times, told CCTV in early 2019. He mentioned that the J-16 is now covered with silver-gray painting which makes it less visible to the naked eye and electromagnetic devices.

Fu Qianshao, a Chinese military aviation expert, told the Global Times that the aerodynamic design of the J-16 stresses maneuverability rather than stealth but the coating can make it more difficult to detect.

Since September 2020, the J-16 has become a frequent participant of PLA’s routine exercises near the Taiwan Straits, according to Taiwan island’s defense authorities. The J-16 is also deployed by the PLA Western Theater Command in a move to better safeguard China’s territorial integrity in the western regions.

Source: Global Times “China’s J-16 fighter jet is flawless and much superior to the Su-30: pilot”

Note: This is Global Times’ report I post here for readers’ information. It does not mean whether I agree or disagree with the report’ views.


China’s new H-20 stealth bomber could hit Pearl Harbor: analysts


H-20 could alter the strategic calculus between the US and China by exposing US bases and fleets to surprise air attacks

By DAVE MAKICHUK

December 27, 2020

The H-20 “strategic bomber,” which was likely modelled after the Northrop Grumman B-2 Spirit, above, was designed to penetrate anti-aircraft defences and drop devastating nuclear payloads. Credit: Handout.

Just when things were not going well for the Pentagon, vis-a-vis China’s rapid military growth, US planners now have to rethink the entire scenario.

There’s a new kid on the block, and “he” is terrifying.

It involves China’s new H-20 stealth bomber, which is believed to have a range of up to 7,500 miles, the UK’s Sun reported.

Analysts believe that would easily bring Hawaii — 6,000 miles away — into reach in chilling echoes of the 1941 attack by the Japanese, making it a “truly intercontinental” threat.

According to the South China Morning Post, which cited a London-based Royal United Services Institute for Defence and Security Studies report, the state-of-the-art H-20 can carry a massive weapons payload of 45 tonnes and fly great distances without mid-air refuelling.

The 630 mph war machine is still under development, according to the leading think tank, but the Pentagon fears one day it will be able to target US overseas territories such as Guam, The Sun reported.

“Armed with nuclear and conventional stand-off missiles, the H-20 would represent a major break from previous PLAAF (People’s Liberation Army Air Force) doctrine and equipment development practice,” it reads.

The PLAAF is designed to be a regional force capable of missions on the first island chain – ranging from the Kuril Islands to Japan and onto the Philippines, The Sun reported.

“The H-20, by contrast, would give China a truly intercontinental power-projection capability,” the report said.

Plans for the H-20 were first announced in 2016 and the nuclear bomber may be ready to enter service in five years.

The “strategic bomber,” which was likely modelled after the Northrop Grumman B-2 Spirit, was designed to penetrate anti-aircraft defences and drop devastating nuclear payloads.

Reports have said the H-20 will be able to deliver a payload of 45 tonnes, including nukes, and fire hypersonic cruise missiles.

Importantly, the Hong-20 will also complete the country’s so-called “nuclear triad,” The Sun reported.

This consists of ground-based ballistic missiles, submarine-launched ballistic missiles and the long-range nuclear-capable bombers.

While the H-20 still remains mysterious to a large degree, it may not at all come close to rivaling the Air Force’s new B-21 Sky Raider, National Interest reported.

Quoting “military sources,” a report from The New Zealand Herald said the new and still somewhat mysterious H-20 bomber was to make its first public appearance at this year’s cancelled Zhuhai Airshow.

The New Zealand report also said the new supersonic stealth bomber could “double” China’s strike range.

If the H-20 does have the range and passable stealth characteristics attributed to it, it could alter the strategic calculus between the United States and China by exposing US bases and fleets across the Pacific to surprise air attacks, National Interest reported.

Strategic bombers make sense for China because Beijing perceives dominance of the western half of the Pacific Ocean as essential for its security due to its history of maritime invasion, and the challenge posed by the United States in particular.

The two superpowers are separated by five to six thousand miles of ocean — and the United States has spent the last century developing a network of island territories such as Guam, foreign military bases in East Asia and super-carriers with which it can project air and sea power across that span, National Interest reported.

Source: Asia Times “China’s new H-20 stealth bomber could hit Pearl Harbor: analysts”

Note: This is Asia Times’ article I post here for readers’ information. It does not mean that I agree or disagree with the article’s views.


China Looks To Create An Army Of Stealth Fighter Jets With New ‘Metamaterial’ Element


Published 1 day ago on November 21, 2020By Mansij Asthana

Scientists in China have reportedly made breakthroughs in an engineered material that is set to enhance the stealth technology used in fighter jets in possession of the People’s Liberation Army (PLA).

Stealth technology is considered to the most advanced technology used in the modern age of combat fighters like the US F-35 Lightning, F-22 Raptors and Chinese J-20s.

Also termed as low observable technology (LO technology), stealth is a part of the military tactic to make fighter jets, ships, submarines, missiles, satellites, ground vehicles, and even personnel less visible or almost invisible to radar, infrared, sonar, and other detection methods.

While most fighter jets, especially the F-35s and Raptors are designed in a manner in order to reduce their radar cross-section (RCS), which is the electromagnetic signature of the object, the new materials called “Metamaterials” are considered to further reduce radar detection.

According to South China Morning Post, Professor Luo Xiangang and his colleagues at the Chengdu-based Institute of Optics and Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, have created the world’s first-ever mathematical model which precisely describes the behavior of electromagnetic waves when they “strike a piece of metal engraved with microscopic patterns”.

As per a test conducted, the Metamaterials are aimed at making the aircraft, stealthier, lighter and cheaper to build, cut the strength of a reflected radar signal (measured in decibels) by between 10 and nearly 30dB in a frequency range from 0.3 to 40 gigahertz.

Metamaterial is a fabricated layer that comprises microscopic structures similar to integrated circuits and it has the ability to alter the manner in which radio waves bounce off its surface to create a ghost image or minimize echo on the radar.

This helps fighter jets in hiding from other aircraft with great efficiency as they do not register on the enemy radar.

According to Chinese media reports, the Metamaterial was designed and developed by a research team at the State Key Laboratory of Millimetre Waves in Southeast University in Nanjing, Jiangsu province.

According to a researcher at the lab, the Metamaterials were being tested on aircraft at a major military aircraft production base in Shenyang, Liaoning province.

While the researcher has refused to name the test site or the aircraft used for the Metamaterial, there are suggestions that it is indeed the Shenyang Aircraft Corporation, as the Aviation Industry Corporation of China subsidiary builds non-stealth fighter jets, like the J-11 and the J-15.

The materials are not only looked at as enhancing the stealth properties of current fighters but also for making non-stealthy fighters stealthy.

Beijing which has around 20 J-20 stealth fighters and roughly 1,500 other fighters in their ranks will drastically improve upon their aerial prowess in comparison to the United States and Russia if Metamaterials are successful in upgrading their existing non-stealth aircraft.

According to reports, over the past few years, the Chinese government has funded dozens of research teams to develop the technology to hide or make objects disappear from view, however, there have been no public reports on the mass application of the materials.

“This is the beginning. More (applications) are on the way,” said the researcher at the State Key Laboratory of Millimetre Waves.

However, amid China’s claims about the Metamaterials, the stealth enhancing element has been a popular research subject for countries across the world with the US heavily engaged in the research and development of similar technology to cloak military jets.

According to a report in the Financial Times – “Metamaterials first captured the public imagination in 2006, when John Pendry of Imperial College published two papers showing how to create a Harry Potter-style invisibility cloak using the specially engineered materials.”

While the materials hold the key to unlocking the true potential of stealth technology in the future, according to Han Yiping, Director of applied physics at Xidian University, the materials alone could not be able to hide the fighter jets from enemy radar.

“Stealth aircraft relied on a range of tactics, including low-reflection aerodynamic design and cloaks of ionized particles, to fly undetected,” Han said.

Metamaterials were also extremely difficult to mass-produce, and the technology would have to withstand the heat and shock of battle, meaning some performance would have to be sacrificed for reliability,”

And at present, the technology was effective within only certain radio bandwidths.” Han said

Photo

China’s J-20 stealth fighter is gaining on America’s top jets – Sandboxx

File Image

Source: EurAsian Times “China Looks To Create An Army Of Stealth Fighter Jets With New ‘Metamaterial’ Element”

Note: This is EirAsian Times’ article I post here for readers’ information. It does not mean that I agree or disagree with the article’s views.


PLAAF J-16 fighter pilots seen using new helmet


by Andreas Rupprecht & Gabriel Dominguez

11 NOVEMBER 2020

Footage released on 11 November by the state-owned China Central Television 7 (CCTV 7) channel shows that People’s Liberation Army Air Force (PLAAF) pilots of J-16 multirole fighter aircraft are using what appears to be a new helmet featuring a helmet-mounted display system (HMDS) for increased situational awareness.

Photo J-16 helmet

A still from CCTV 7 footage released on 11 November showing the pilot of a PLAAF J-16 fighter aircraft wearing what appears to be a new helmet featuring an HMDS. (CCTV 7)

The footage, which was released as part of a report to mark the 71st anniversary of the founding of the PLAAF, shows the J-16 pilots wearing the helmet while preparing to carry out an aerial combat training mission at an undisclosed location.

No details were provided about the new helmet, how long it has been in PLAAF service, or whether it is only being used by J-16 pilots.

That said, the CCTV report noted that four members of the J-16 unit shown in the footage had won the service’s Golden Helmet aerial combat competition in 2018. The competition has been held every year since 2011 at the Dingxin Test and Training Base in Gansu Province to identify the service’s best fighter pilots.

Source: Janes “PLAAF J-16 fighter pilots seen using new helmet”

Note: This is Janes’ report I post here for readers’ information. It does not mean that I agree or disagree with the report’ views.


China’s stealth fighter goes into mass production after thrust upgrade


  • The J-20B has overcome agility problems to finally be considered a fully fledged fifth-generation fighter, military source says
  • Aircraft still will be fitted with Russian engine but ‘Chinese version could be ready in a year or two’
China’s first J-20 stealth fighter jets entered service in 2017. Photo: AP

A modified version of

China’s first stealth fighter jet, the J-20, 

has formally entered mass production, with upgrades earning it a place as a fifth-generation fighter jet, according to a military source close to the project.

The moment was marked at a ceremonial unveiling of the modified J-20B stealth fighter jet on Wednesday attended by many senior military leaders including Central Military Commission (CMC) vice-chairman General Zhang Youxia, the source said.

Zhang is the second-ranked vice-chairman of the CMC and is in charge of weapons development for the People’s Liberation Army.

“Mass production of the J-20B started on Wednesday. It has finally become a complete stealth fighter jet, with its agility meeting the original criteria,” the source said.

Thrust vector control (TVC) allows pilots to better control the aircraft by redirecting engine thrust.

In 2018, China debuted its J-10C multirole fighter –

fitted with a WS-10 Taihang engine  – at the China air show in Zhuhai, putting the aircraft through its paces in a performance that indicated that China had succeeded in thrust technology.

Chinese engineers

have been developing high-thrust turbofan WS-15 engines

for the J-20, but that work has fallen behind schedule.

“The Chinese engine designed for the J-20s still failed to meet requirements, but its development is going quite smoothly, and it may be ready in the next one or two years,” the source said.

“The ultimate goal is to equip the J-20B fighter jets with domestic engines.”

Powerful Dragon v Raptor: how China’s J-20 stealth fighters compare with America’s F-22sPowerful Dragon v Raptor: how China’s J-20 stealth fighters compare with America’s F-22s

Powerful Dragon v Raptor: how China’s J-20 stealth fighters compare with America’s F-22s

China’s first batch of J-20s entered service in 2017 when the US decided to deploy more than 100 F-35s to Japan and South Korea that year.

The J-20 was meant to be a fifth-generation fighter jet on a par with Lockheed’s F-22 Raptor and F-35 Lightning multirole strike fighters.

Fifth-generation fighters are defined by their stealth technology, supersonic cruising speed, super manoeuvrability, and highly integrated avionics.

But the earlier version of the J-20 was described by Western media as a “dedicated interceptor aircraft” because of its lack of agility.

“The launch of the J-20B means this aircraft now is a formal fifth-generation fighter jet,” the military source said, adding that Chengdu Aerospace Corporation (CAC), which manufactures the J-20s, had received “heavy orders” from the PLA.

CAC set up its fourth production line in 2019, each one with a capacity to make about one J-20 a month.

China’s J-20 stealth fighters ready for combatChina’s J-20 stealth fighters ready for combat

China’s J-20 stealth fighters ready for combat


People’s Liberation Army Air Force J-10 Fighter Jets Ready For Penetration Flight


July 9, 2020

(eng.chinamil.com.cn/Photo by Yang Pan)

On 2020/7/5 China military online published photo of People’s Liberation Army Air Force J-10 fighter jets ready for penetration flight.

J-10 fighter jets attached to an aviation brigade of the air force under the PLA Northern Theater Command taxi in close formation on the flightline before takeoff for a recent penetration flight training exercise.

(eng.chinamil.com.cn/Photo by Yang Pan)

(eng.chinamil.com.cn/Photo by Yang Pan)

Pilots assigned to an aviation brigade of the air force under the PLA Northern Theater Command have pre-flight communications prior to a recent penetration flight training exercise.

Ground crews assigned to an aviation brigade of the air force under the PLA Northern Theater Command load rockets onto a J-10 fighter jet prior to a recent penetration flight training exercise.

The Chengdu J-10 also known as Vigorous Dragon is a single-engine, lightweight multirole fighter aircraft capable of all-weather operation, configured with a delta wing and canard design, with fly-by-wire flight controls, and produced by the Chengdu Aircraft Corporation (CAC) for the People’s Liberation Army Air Force (PLAAF).

Tensions between the world’s two most populous countries have risen to their highest levels in more than four decades after 20 Indian soldiers were reportedly killed in hand-to-hand combat in the Himalayas.

As we have previously reported, the Satellite Imagery that Shows PLAAF Fighter Jets Deployment Along With The LAC.

In response to PLAAF deployment, alleged photos show that IAF also Deployed new AH-64E Apache attack helicopters & upgraded MiG-29 fighter jet in ladakh.

Source: fighterjetsworld.com “People’s Liberation Army Air Force J-10 Fighter Jets Ready For Penetration Flight”

Note: This is fighterjetsworld.com’s article I post here for readers’ information. It does not mean that I agree or disagree with the articles views.


China’s long-range Xian H-20 stealth bomber could make its debut this year


  • Beijing ‘carefully considering’ unveiling the plane at the Zhuhai Airshow in November at a time of heightened regional tension
  • H-20 will give China the nuclear triad of submarines, ballistic missiles and bombers
An artist’s impression of what the H-20 may look like. Photo: Weibo
An artist’s impression of what the H-20 may look like. Photo: Weibo
China’s new generation strategic bomber is likely to be ready for delivery this year, but Beijing is said to be weighing the impact of its unveiling at a complex time in regional relations due to the coronavirus pandemic.
Military sources said the Xian H-20 supersonic stealth bomber – expected to double the country’s strike range – could make its first public appearance at this year’s Zhuhai Airshow  in November, if the pandemic was sufficiently under control.

“The Zhuhai Airshow is expected to become a platform to promote China’s image and its success in pandemic control – telling the outside world that the contagion did not have any big impacts on Chinese defence industry enterprises,” a source said.

But the appearance of the bomber at this year’s air show could heighten tensions by directly threatening countries within its strike range, especially Australia, Japan and the Korean peninsula.

Video

Thrilling aerobatics fill the skies to open air show in central China

“The Beijing leadership is still carefully considering whether its commission will affect regional balance, especially as regional tensions have been escalating over the Covid-19 pandemic,” another source said.

Tensions in the region have worsened in the past month with a war of words between Beijing and Washington over the pandemic, and both sides increasing naval patrolsof the Taiwan Strait and South and East China seas.

The arrival of the H-20 would mark the completion of China’s “nuclear triad” of ground-based intercontinental ballistic missiles, submarine-launched missiles and air-launched weapons.

An H-6K bomber, or China’s B-52, flies over the South China Sea. Photo: AP
An H-6K bomber, or China’s B-52, flies over the South China Sea. Photo: AP

Chinese state television has said the H-20 could alter the strategic calculus between the US and China by doubling the strike range of its current H-6K, dubbed the country’s B-52.

The H-20 has reportedly been designed to strike targets beyond the second island ring – which includes US bases in Japan, Guam, the Philippines and other countries – from bases in mainland China. The third island chain extends to Hawaii and coastal Australia.

It will be equipped with nuclear and conventional missiles with a maximum take-off weight of at least 200 tonnes and a payload of up to 45 tonnes. The bomber is expected to fly at subsonic speeds and could potentially unleash four powerful hypersonic stealth cruise missiles.

For the J-20, engineers were developing high-thrust turbofan WS-15 engines, but the jet is understood to be using either Chinese WS-10B or Russian-built AL-31FM2/3 engines, which compromise its manoeuvrability and stealth capabilities at subsonic speeds.

Military enthusiasts have speculated the H-20 might use the NK-321 Russian engine but two independent military sources said it would be equipped with an upgraded WS-10 engine.

“The WS-10 is still a transitional engine for the H-20 because it is not powerful enough. The eligible replacement may take two to three years for development,” one of the sources said.

The second said the speed of the H-20 would be slower than its original design, with some of its original combat capability being reduced.

“That’s why the American air force doesn’t care about the H-20, because it is not strong and powerful enough to cause any challenge to their B-2 and B-21 bombers.”

If the US decided to deploy more F-35 supersonic fighter jets – it has already sold about 200 to Japan and South Korea – it could push China to bring forward the unveiling of the new bomber, the second source said.

“For example, if some US decision makers decided to deploy up to 500 F-35s to Japan, South Korea, and even Singapore, India and Taiwan – making almost all of China’s neighbours in the Indo-Pacific region use F-35s to contain China – that would push Beijing to launch the H-20 as soon as possible.”

The H-20 is believed to have been in development since the early 2000s. The project to develop a strategic bomber was first announced by the People’s Liberation Army in 2016.