Chinese President Xi Jinping tells troops to focus on ‘preparing for war’


CNN Digital Expansion 2017. Ben Westcott

By Ben Westcott, CNN

Updated 1353 GMT (2153 HKT) October 14, 2020

Hong Kong (CNN) Chinese President Xi Jinping has called on troops to “put all (their) minds and energy on preparing for war” in a visit to a military base in the southern province of Guangdong on Tuesday, according to state news agency Xinhua.

During an inspection of the People’s Liberation Army Marine Corps in Chaozhou City, Xinhua said Xi told the soldiers to “maintain a state of high alert” and called on them to be “absolutely loyal, absolutely pure, and absolutely reliable.”

The main purpose of Xi’s visit to Guangdong was to deliver a speech Wednesday commemorating the 40th anniversary of the Shenzhen Special Economic Zone, which was established in 1980 to attract foreign capital and played a vital role in helping China’s economy become the second-largest in the world.

But the military visit comes as tensions between China and the United States remain at their highest point in decades, with disagreements over Taiwan and the coronavirus pandemic creating sharp divisions between Washington and Beijing.

The White House notified US Congress Monday that it was planning to move ahead with the sale of three advanced weapon systems to Taiwan, according to a congressional aide, including the advanced High Mobility Artillery Rocket System (HIMARS).

In a stern response from Beijing, Foreign Ministry spokesman Zhao Lijian called on Washington to “immediately cancel any arms sales plans to Taiwan” and cut all “US-Taiwan military ties.”

Even though Taiwan has never been controlled by China’s ruling Communist Party, authorities in Beijing insist the democratic, self-governing island is an integral part of their territory, with Xi himself refusing to rule out military force to capture it if necessary.

Despite the Chinese government’s disapproval, relations between Washington and Taipei have grown closer under the Trump administration. In August, US Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar became the highest-level US official to visit Taiwan in decades, when he traveled to the island ostensibly to discuss the pandemic.

In response, Beijing increased military drills around Taiwan. Almost 40 Chinese warplanes crossed the median line between the mainland and Taiwan on September 18-19 — one of several sorties the island’s President Tsai Ing-wen called a “threat of force.”

In a speech to the RAND Corporation on September 16, US Secretary of Defense Mark Esper said China “cannot match the United States” in terms of naval power and labeled Beijing a “malign influence.”

“(China and Russia) are using predatory economics, political subversion, and military force in an attempt to shift the balance of power in their favor, and often at the expense of others,” he told the audience.

In early October, Esper announced his “Battle Force 2045” plan, which calls for an expanded and modernized US Navy of 500 manned and unmanned vessels by 2045.

Source: CNN “Chinese President Xi Jinping tells troops to focus on ‘preparing for war’”

Note: This is CNN’s report I post here for readers’ information. It does not mean that I agree or disagree with the report’ views.


China may outmatch American military in missile development and shipbuilding, says US Defence Department report


  • China has already achieved parity with – or even exceeded – the United States in several military modernisation areas,’ says Pentagon

  • China is likely to double its nuclear warhead stockpile over the next decade, according to the report

Robert Delaney

Mark Magnier

Robert Delaney and Mark Magnier in the United States

Published: 3:54am, 2 Sep, 2020

China may have surpassed American military capabilities in the area of missile development and shipbuilding, and is likely to double its nuclear warhead stockpile over the next decade, the US Defence Department said in an annual report to US lawmakers.

China has already achieved parity with – or even exceeded – the United States in several military modernisation areas,” including shipbuilding, land-based conventional ballistic and cruise missiles, and integrated air defence systems, said the report, which was made public on Tuesday

Source: Excerpts of SCMP’s report “China may outmatch American military in missile development and shipbuilding, says US Defence Department report”, full text of which can be found at https://www.scmp.com/news/china/article/3099809/china-may-outmatch-american-military-missile-development-and

Note: This is SCMP’s report I post here for readers’ information. It does not mean that I agree or disagree with the report’ views.


Trump administration says Huawei, Hikvision backed by Chinese military


Published Thu, Jun 25 202012:16 AM EDT

Key Points

  • The Trump administration has determined that top Chinese firms, including telecoms equipment giant Huawei Technologies and video surveillance company Hikvision, are owned or controlled by the Chinese military, laying the groundwork for new U.S. financial sanctions.

  • The designations were drawn up by the Defense Department, which was mandated by a 1999 law to compile a list of Chinese military companies operating in the United States, including those “owned or controlled” by the People’s Liberation Army that provide commercial services, manufacture, produce or export.

  • The Pentagon’s designations do not trigger penalties, but the law says the president may impose sanctions that could include blocking all property of the listed parties.

The Trump administration has determined that top Chinese firms, including telecoms equipment giant Huawei Technologies and video surveillance company Hikvision, are owned or controlled by the Chinese military, laying the groundwork for new U.S. financial sanctions.

Washington placed Huawei and Hikvision on a trade blacklist last year over national security concerns and has led an international campaign to convince allies to exclude Huawei from their 5G networks.

A Department of Defense (DOD) document listing 20 companies operating in the United States that Washington alleges are backed by the Chinese military was first reported by Reuters.

The DOD document also includes China Mobile Communications Group and China Telecommunications Corp as well as aircraft manufacturer Aviation Industry Corp of China.

The designations were drawn up by the Defense Department, which was mandated by a 1999 law to compile a list of Chinese military companies operating in the United States, including those “owned or controlled” by the People’s Liberation Army that provide commercial services, manufacture, produce or export.

The Pentagon’s designations do not trigger penalties, but the law says the president may impose sanctions that could include blocking all property of the listed parties.

Huawei, China Mobile, China Telecom, AVIC and the Chinese Embassy in Washington did not respond to requests for comment.

Hikvision called the allegations “baseless,” noting it was not a “Chinese military company,” and had never participated in any R&D work for military applications but would work with the United States government to resolve the matter.

The Pentagon has come under pressure from lawmakers of both U.S. political parties to publish the list, amid rising tensions between Washington and Beijing over technology, trade and foreign policy.

Last September, top U.S. Senate Democrat Chuck Schumer, Republican Senator Tom Cotton and Republican Representative Mike Gallagher penned a letter to Defense Secretary Mark Esper raising concerns about Beijing’s enlisting of Chinese corporations to harness emerging civilian technologies for military purposes.

Will you commit to updating and publicly releasing this list as soon as possible?” they asked in the letter.

On Wednesday, Cotton and Gallagher praised the DOD for releasing the list and urging the president to impose economic penalties against the firms.

The White House did not comment on whether it would sanction the companies on the list, but a senior administration official said the list can be seen as “a useful tool for the U.S. Government, companies, investors, academic institutions, and likeminded partners to conduct due diligence with regard to partnerships with these entities, particularly as the list grows.”

The list will likely add to tensions between the world’s two largest economies, which have been at loggerheads over the handling of the coronavirus pandemic and China’s move to impose security legislation on Hong Kong, among multiple points of friction that have worsened this year.

Last week, China threatened retaliation after President Donald Trump signed legislation calling for sanctions over the repression of China’s Uighurs.

The list “is a start, but woefully inadequate to warn the American people about the state-owned and -directed companies that support the Chinese government and Communist Party’s activities threatening U.S. economic and national security,” Republican Senator Marco Rubio, who sponsored the Uighur bill, said in a statement.

Spotlight on U.S. ties

The list will also turn a spotlight on U.S. companies’ ties to the Chinese firms as well as their operations in the United States.

In 2012, U.S.-based General Electric set up a 50/50 avionics joint venture with AVIC known as Aviage Systems, to supply equipment for China’s C919 passenger jet.

The Defense Department list also includes China Railway Construction Corp, China Aerospace Science and Industry Corp (CASIC), as well as CRRC, the world’s largest maker of passenger trains, which has clinched contracts in Boston, Philadelphia, Chicago and Los Angeles by underbidding rivals.

The companies did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

Many of the firms listed are already in the crosshairs of U.S. regulators.

The blacklisting of Huawei and Hikvision has forced some of their U.S. suppliers to seek licenses before selling to them.

In April, the U.S. Justice Department and other federal agencies called on the Federal Communications Commission to revoke China Telecom (Americas) Corp’s authorization to provide international telecommunications services to and from the United States. The telecoms regulator rejected a similar request by China Mobile last year that had been pending for years.

Source: CNBC “Trump administration says Huawei, Hikvision backed by Chinese military”

Note: This is CNBC’s report I post here for readers’ information. It does not mean that I agree or disagree with the report’ views.


“Prepare For Worst-Case Scenarios”: Xi Jinping To Chinese Military


By Business League – May 27, 2020

Xi Jinping’s comments came amid a face-off between the militaries of India and China at the Line of Actual Control (LAC).

Beijing: Chinese President Xi Jinping on Tuesday ordered the military to scale up the

battle preparedness, visualising the worst-case scenarios and asked them to resolutely defend the country’s sovereignty. Though he did no mention any specific threat, his comments came amid a face-off between soldiers of India and China at the Line of Actual Control (LAC).Xi, 66 who is also the General Secretary of the ruling Communist Party of China (CPC) and head of the two-million-strong military with prospects of lifelong tenure in power, made the remarks while attending a plenary meeting of the delegation of the People’s Liberation Army (PLA) and People’s Armed Police Force during the current parliament session being held in Beijing.

Xi ordered the military to think about worst-case scenarios, scale up training and battle preparedness, promptly and effectively deal with all sorts of complex situations and resolutely safeguard national sovereignty, security and development interests, state-run Xinhua news agency reported, without mentioning any specific issues that posed a threat to the country.

Several areas along the LAC in Ladakh and North Sikkim have witnessed major military build-up by both the Indian and Chinese armies recently, in a clear signal of escalating tension and hardening of respective positions by the two sides even two weeks after they were engaged in two separate face-offs. The nearly 3,500-km-long LAC is the de-facto border between the two countries.

China’s military friction with the US has also been on the rise with the American navy stepping its patrols in the disputed South China Sea as well as the Taiwan Straits. Washington and Beijing are also engaged in a war of words over the origin of the coronavirus pandemic.

On May 22, China, the second-largest military spender after the US, hiked its defence budget by 6.6 per cent to $179 billion, nearly three times that of India, the lowest increment in recent years amidst the massive disruption caused to the communist giant’s economy by the COVID-19 pandemic.

India has said the Chinese military was hindering normal patrolling by its troops along the LAC in Ladakh and Sikkim and strongly refuted Beijing’s contention that the escalating tension between the two armies was triggered by trespassing of Indian forces across the Chinese side.

The Ministry of External Affairs said all Indian activities were carried out on its side of the border, asserting that India has always taken a very responsible approach towards border management. At the same time, it said, India was deeply committed to protect its sovereignty and security.

Any suggestion that Indian troops had undertaken activity across the LAC in the Western sector or the Sikkim sector is not accurate. Indian troops are fully familiar with the alignment of the Line of Actual Control in the India-China border areas and abide by it scrupulously,” MEA Spokesperson Anurag Srivastava said at an online media briefing last week.

(With inputs from PTI)

Source: Business League ““Prepare For Worst-Case Scenarios”: Xi Jinping To Chinese Military”

Note: This is Business League’s report I post here for readers’ information. It does not mean that I agree or disagree with the report’ views.


Norinco’s Sharp Claw I UGV in service with Chinese army


15 April 2020

A screen grab from a CCTV 7 video showing the Norinco Sharp Claw I UGV. On 13 April the PLA’s Eastern Theatre Command confirmed via its Sina Weibo account media reports that the UGV is now in service with the PLAGF. Source: CCTV 7

The China North Industries Corporation’s (Norinco’s) Sharp Claw I unmanned ground vehicle (UGV) has entered service with the People’s Liberation Army Ground Force (PLAGF).

In an announcement made on 13 April via its Sina Weibo account the PLA’s Eastern Theatre Command confirmed an 11 April report by the China Central Television 7 (CCTV 7) channel stating that the tracked, combat, and reconnaissance UGV was now in service with the Chinese military.

No information was provided as to when exactly it entered service, the number of platforms being acquired, or which PLAGF units will deploy it.

The UGV, which was first unveiled at the Airshow China 2014 exhibition in Zhuhai, weighs 120 kg, is 60 cm high, 70 cm long, and has an operational range of 1 km, according to Jane’s Land Warfare Platforms: Logistics, Support & Unmanned .

The platform, which can be carried in the cargo bay of the larger Sharp Claw II UGV, has been designed for use in remote areas unsuitable for personnel to detect and attack targets “in all weather conditions during the day and at night”, according to the manufacturer.

The platform, which Norinco claims can operate autonomously, can be armed with a 7.62 mm light machine gun.

As Jane’s reported, Norinco displayed an improved variant of the Sharp Claw I at Airshow China 2018. The newer version features several upgrades – including an improved short-range electro-optical payload, machine vision, and lighting suite, as well as a refined magazine box and ammunition feed mechanism – aimed at enhancing the platform’s reconnaissance and combat capabilities.

CCTV 7 also reported on 11 April that the PLA Rocket Force is receiving a “large, crane-like robot that can be used in lifting and loading missiles onto transporter-erector launchers”, thus enabling more missiles to be launched from the same launcher within short intervals.

Source: Jane’s 360 “Norinco’s Sharp Claw I UGV in service with Chinese army”

Note: This is Jane’s 360’s article I post here for readers’ information. It does not mean that I agree or disagree with the article’s views.


US Military to Fall Behind China’s despite Huge Budget


Forbes’ article “Building The Air Force We Need To Meet Chinese And Russian Threats” begins by saying, “In January, the Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) released its unclassified assessment of China’s military capabilities, with the telling subtitle: ‘Modernizing a Force to Fight and Win.’ As DIA director Lt. Gen. Robert Ashley explained: ‘China is building a robust, lethal force with capabilities spanning the air, maritime, space and information domains which will enable China to impose its will in the region.’ He went on to emphasize: ‘…the PLA [People’s Liberation Army] is on the verge of fielding some of the most modern weapons systems in the world. In some areas, it already leads the world.’”

The writer of the article blames former US Secretary of Defense Robert Gates for ceasing production of stealth fighter F-22 as he predicted that China would not have any stealth fighter jet by 2020 but why did he no change his mind to regard China’s military development as a “threat” when China tested its J-20 stealth fighter for the first time when he visited China in 2011? Because he was arrogant and did not believe that China would succeed in satisfactorily developing J-20 by 2020.

Now, Pentagon has changed its mind and begun to take China’s military development seriously. However, the US lacks funds to substantially increase its military budget. With much smaller budget, China is still able to catch up with and surpass the US. What if it substantially increase its budget? China has lots of funds to do so.

How can the US stop its own decline and China’s rise?

Think about that.

Comment by Chan Kai Yee on Forbes’ article, full text of which can be viewed at https://www.forbes.com/sites/davedeptula/2019/02/11/building-the-air-force-we-need/amp/.


China’s Plan To Beat The U.S. Navy: Submersible Missile-Laden Arsenal Ships


A game-changer?

by Sarah Sicard November 20, 2019

Key point: These designs are novel takes on more classic submarine designs, providing unique capabilities to the Chinese navy.

The Chinese navy may be putting a new spin on a classic warship: It’s looking into the possibility of giving missile-laden arsenal ships submersible properties, enabling them to hide stockpiles of missiles, undetectable to radar, below the ocean surface.

The Chinese are exploring two arsenal-ship versions, according to Popular Science: One is a high-speed surface warship that can submerge at will, while the second is more similar to a traditional submarine.

What could a submersible surface ship do that a conventional submarine can’t? It could go really fast on the surface, thanks to a hydroplaning hull, Popular Science reports:

For stealth operations, the arsenal ship would have most of its hull inherently submerged, with only the bridge and a few other parts of the ship above the waterline, reducing the radar cross section. But when traveling with a high-speed naval taskforce, the arsenal ship will sacrifice stealth to use its flat hull bottom to hydroplane at high speeds, cutting across the waves like a speedboat or amphibious armored vehicle.

The alternative plan calls for a platform that behaves similar to World War II submarines, Popular Science writes — typically staying at the surface, but able to completely submerge for stealth.

Two Chinese universities are responsible for the designing the concepts, according to the Wuhan city government. Those institutions, the Wuhan University of Science and Technology and Huazhong University of Science and Technology and Naval University of Engineering, were awarded a state prize for the work.

The concepts have been in the works since 2011, but anticipation is building. According to Popular Science, the diving missile ship’s “proof-of-concept is under construction at Bohai Shipbuilding Heavy Industrial Corporation, to be launched after 2020.”

This article by Sarah Sicard originally appeared at Task & Purpose. Follow Task & Purpose on Twitter.

This article first appeared last year.

Source: National Interest “China’s Plan To Beat The U.S. Navy: Submersible Missile-Laden Arsenal Ships”

Note: This is National Interest’s article I post here for readers’ information. It does not mean that I agree or disagree with the article’s views.


US Concerns about China’s New Weapons, Especially Hypersonic Ones


Yahoo says in its report “A Direct Threat to the U.S. Military: China’s New Hypersonic Weapons” copied from National Interest that some new weapons shown in China’s 70th national day military parade “provide cause for serious concern among U.S. policymakers”.

It mentions China’s JL-2 SLBM and DF-41 mobile ICBM and is sad that US ICBMs are 30 years old and that US does not have any mobile ICBMs.

However, their greatest concern is China’s DF-17 hypersonic missile. The US lags behind China and Russia in hypersonic technology. So far there has been no defense of hypersonic missiles so that the report wants the US to contribute a larger percentage than current 6% of its 2.6 billion budget for development of hypersonic weapons.

Comment by Chan Kai Yee on Yahoo’s report, full text of which can be viewed at https://news.yahoo.com/direct-threat-u-military-chinas-143400242.html.


China Displays Its High-altitude Fast Reconnaissance Drone like SR-71


WZ-8 regarded as rival to US SR-71. Photo from CCTV footage.

China displays its advanced new weapons at its National Day military parade yesterday.

Defenseworld.net says in its report “New Dagger Shaped High-altitude Reconnaissance Drone Debuts at China’s National Day Parade” that according to Wu Jian, editor of Defense Weekly under Shanghai-based Xinmin Evening News, the drone can effectively gather intelligence in real time in a controllable way.

It says that Wu is of the opinion that a satellite can conduct reconnaissance only when it is above the target so that the enemy may be alerted of the drone’s intention to guide missile to attack the target.

Mil.huanqiu.com, on the other hand says in its report “Annalyses of Equipment: They are the weightiest stars of this massive military parade” that according to Taiwan media, WZ-8 flies at supersonic speed and that it matches US SR-71 in functions and design.

Comment by Chan Kai Yee on defenseworld.net and mil.huanqiu.com’s reports, full text can respectively be viewed at https://www.defenseworld.net/news/25594/New_Dagger_Shaped_High_altitude_Reconnaissance_Drone_Debuts_at_China___s_National_Day_Parade#.XZPrpW5uKvt and https://mil.huanqiu.com/article/7Qq0K2E50Tm.


See These Chinese Missiles? They Can Sink an Aircraft Carrier


And America doesn’t have them.

by Kyle Mizokami September 26, 2019

Key point: America’s weapons are the best, but Beijing has some good ones anyone might want.

We all know that there are plenty of U.S. weapons the Chinese military would like to get its hands on. The Arsenal of Democracy churns out some of the best, most technologically advanced and versatile weapons in service anywhere. China is willing to steal American military technology to help advance its own military research and development programs.

The United States on the other hand…well, there is probably not a single Chinese weapon that, in a direct comparison, is better than its American equivalent and that probably won’t change for another twenty years. So if we want to talk about Chinese weapons for the American military, we have to think about holes in current American capabilities. There aren’t many, but here are Chinese weapons that might make the American military a little better.

AG600 Seaplane

The United States made extensive use of seaplanes during the Second World War, where they were instrumental in rescuing downed pilots and providing long-range reconnaissance. It was a PBY Catalina seaplane that reported the location of Admiral Nagumo’s fleet, setting the stage for the American victory at the Battle of Midway.

If the United States is serious about fighting across the expanse of the Pacific, it will once again need a long-range aircraft that can land in the water. China’s new AG600 seaplane is the answer. The largest seaplane in the world, it’s as big as a Boeing 737. It can carry up to fifty passengers, has a range of 3,100 miles, and can stay aloft for up to twelve hours.

DF-ZF Hypersonic Vehicle

Washington has expressed interest in so-called hypersonic weapons—weapons that travel at more than five times the speed of sound. Several projects, including the X-51 scramjet—have undergone development, but despite the technical prowess of the United States no one system has reached operational status yet.

The DF-ZF hypersonic vehicle is seemingly farther along than its American equivalents. The DF-ZF, which travels at speeds between 4,000 and 7,000 miles an hour, has had seven successful tests. Although the Chinese weapon travels more slowly than its American equivalent, it appears much closer to operational status than anything in development in the United States.

ZBD-05 Amphibious Infantry Fighting Vehicle

The U.S. Marine Corps attempt to replace the AAV-7 amphibious assault vehicle is now in its fourth decade. The original project, begun in 1988 resulted in the Expeditionary Fighting Vehicle, a failed effort that consumed $3 billion dollars before being canceled in 2011.

The U.S. is pressing ahead with the new Amphibious Combat Vehicle initiative, but in the meantime what about the Chinese ZBD-05? Developed by Chinese defense contractor Norinco, the ZBD-05 has a crew of three, can carry ten passengers, and has a 30-millimeter cannon mounted in a turret. It has ballistic protection up to .50 caliber rounds and shrapnel, and has a water speed of up to eighteen miles an hour.

Type 072A LST

Amphibious capability is going to be key in any future standoff in the Western Pacific. As part of a broader switch to fewer, more capable platforms America’s amphibious fleet is concentrated in massive the Wasp, America, and San Antonio-class ships of the U.S. Navy. Always accompanied by a slew of escorts, these hulking ships attract attention.

The Type 072A landing ship is a frigate-sized amphibious vessel. Just 390 feet long and 3,400 tons empty, the ships can carry three hundred troops, a dozen tanks, or eight hundred tons of cargo. It has a helicopter flight deck on the stern and a well deck that can accommodate China’s version of the LCAC air cushion transport. The Type 072A could be just the thing for quietly slipping into an area, depositing a small company-sized force of marines, and slipping away—without sending in an entire amphibious ready group.

Type 056 Corvette

The United States needs a capable littoral combat ship. Despite more than a decade of ship construction and development of high tech “mission modules”, the Littoral Combat Ship program has created a growing fleet of minimally capable ships armed largely with a single 57-millimeter and two 30-millimeter guns.

In the “perfect is the enemy of good” vein of thinking, consider the Type 056 corvette. The Type 056 is a small, 1,500 ton general purpose warship. The Type 056 may not rely on robotics and fancy swappable mission modules, but it’s cheap and available. It has a 76-millimeter gun, two 30-millimeter guns, and four YJ-83 anti-ship missiles. It has a FL-3000N launcher for air self defense.

For antisubmarine warfare, it has two triple-tube 324-millimeter torpedo launchers and more recent versions have a towed-array sonar system. It has a helicopter flight deck but not a hangar.

Kyle Mizokami is a defense and national security writer based in San Francisco who has appeared in the Diplomat, Foreign Policy, War is Boring and the Daily Beast. In 2009 he cofounded the defense and security blog Japan Security Watch. You can follow him on Twitter: @KyleMizokami. This first appeared in August 2016.

Source: National Interest “See These Chinese Missiles? They Can Sink an Aircraft Carrier.”

Note: This is National Interest’s article I post here for readers’ information. It does not mean that I agree or disagree with the article’s views.