China restates opposition to sanctions on Russia over Ukraine


Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Qin Gang

Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Qin Gang

China’s foreign ministry on Monday restated its opposition to placing sanctions on Russia over the crisis in Ukraine, after leaders of the Group of Seven (G7) major economies agreed to swiftly impose further punitive measures.

Ministry spokesman Qin Gang said China had “maintained communication” with all sides since the outset of the Ukraine crisis, including the G7 countries, and explained its position.

“On the issue of international relations, China has consistently opposed threatening or imposing sanctions. We believe that sanctions are not conducive to an issue’s resolution, and may worsen tensions,” he told a daily news briefing.

“We call on all sides to keep using dialogue and negotiation to appropriately resolve disagreements, to push for a political resolution to the Ukraine crisis. Sanctions are not in any party’s interests.”

U.S. President Barack Obama, speaking in the Philippines, said Washington would announce new sanctions on Russia later in the day. He said the United States and its allies were keeping in reserve further measures against Moscow.

China has adopted a cautious response to the crisis, not wanting either to alienate key ally Russia or comment directly on the referendum in which Crimea voted overwhelmingly to join Russia, lest it set a precedent for its own restive regions, like Tibet.
But China has also said it would like to continue to develop “friendly cooperation” with Ukraine and that it respects the ex-Soviet state’s independence, sovereignty and territorial integrity.

China said in March, after Crimea’s parliament voted to join Russia, that sanctions were not the best way to resolve the situation.

Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovich, since ousted after three months of sometimes violent protests, visited China in December in the hope of winning much-needed financial aid, but China did not say it would provide any loans.

Source: Reuters “China restates opposition to sanctions on Russia over Ukraine”

Related posts:

  • China Wins Advantages from All Sides in Ukraine Crisis dated March 16, 2014
  • China: Xi Jinping Skillfully Pleases Russia, US, EU, etc. Concerning Ukraine dated March 11, 2014
  • The Mystery of China’s Support for Putin’s Confrontation the West 2” on March 9, 2014
  • The Mystery of China’s Support for Putin’s Confrontation with the West dated March 8, 2014
  • Cold War Again: Russia Plus China v. US dated March 7, 2014
  • China Is Definitely on Russia’s Side but Refrains from Making Its Stance Clear dated March 5, 2014
  • China paper slams West’s ‘Cold War mentality’ over Ukraine dated February 27, 2014
  • The beginning of a new Cold War: On Putin’s Beijing visit dated June 6, 2012

China takes no sides on Ukraine crisis, Xi tells Europe


President Xi Jinping said on Friday China would not take sides with the West or Russia over Ukraine, disappointing any hopes Beijing might add its weight to international pressure on Moscow for annexing Crimea.

“China does not have any private interests in the Ukraine question,” Xi told a news conference with German Chancellor Angela Merkel. “All parties involved should work for a political and diplomatic solution to the conflict.”

China has adopted a cautious response to the Ukraine crisis, not wanting to alienate its ally Russia or make comment directly on a referendum in which Crimea voted to join Russia, lest it set a precedent for restive regions of its own such as Tibet.

In an U.N. Security Council vote earlier this month on a draft resolution to condemn the Moscow-backed referendum in Crimea, China’s abstention effectively isolated Russia.

“If I were Russia, I would not be satisfied with the number of votes in favor of Russia,” said Merkel, who despite her country’s close trade ties with Moscow and heavy reliance on Russia gas exports has backed European Union and U.S. sanctions.

The chancellor, who has tried to use her influence on Russia President Vladimir Putin to de-escalate the crisis, called the U.N. vote a clear sign “that the international community is not very happy with what Russia has done”.

China has signaled understanding for Russia’s position, saying what is happening “has historical reasons”. Chinese state media has also expressed sympathy for Moscow.

DELICATE DIPLOMACY

But China has also said it wants to develop “friendly cooperation” with Ukraine. Its foreign ministry said this week Beijing would play a “constructive role” on international financial aid for Ukraine, though it stopped short of saying whether Beijing would participate directly.

“We support the constructive efforts the international community has made to de-escalate the situation and are open to any concepts which serve to calm the situation and to bring about a political solution,” Xi said in Berlin.

“The Chinese side always respects the principles of international relations and non-intervention in the internal business of other states,” he said.

The Chinese leader’s first visit to Germany since becoming president last year saw the signature of business deals that will add to bilateral trade that was worth about 140 billion euros last year.

But business considerations did not prevent Merkel from publicly raising China’s patchy record on human rights and free speech with the visiting president.

“Broad and free expression of opinion is of course a very important element to promote the creativity of a society, be it in research, culture or civil society,” said the chancellor.

There was no official comment on reports that Xi might visit a monument to the Holocaust in Berlin during his visit. China likes to contrast Germany’s profound atonement for its World War Two atrocities with what it sees as Japan’s reluctance to do so.

Ties between the Asian rivals took a turn for the worse in December last year when Prime Minister Shinzo Abe visited a Tokyo shrine China sees as a symbol of Japan’s militaristic past because it honors wartime leaders and millions of war dead.

But Xi did use a speech in Berlin on Friday evening to recall Japan’s wartime invasion of the Chinese city of Nanjing and say that such atrocities “are still fresh in our memory”.

Source: Reuters “China takes no sides on Ukraine crisis, Xi tells Europe”

Related posts:

  • China Wins Advantages from All Sides in Ukraine Crisis dated March 16, 2014
  • China: Xi Jinping Skillfully Pleases Russia, US, EU, etc. Concerning Ukraine dated March 11, 2014
  • The Mystery of China’s Support for Putin’s Confrontation the West 2” on March 9, 2014
  • The Mystery of China’s Support for Putin’s Confrontation with the West dated March 8, 2014
  • Cold War Again: Russia Plus China v. US dated March 7, 2014
  • China Is Definitely on Russia’s Side but Refrains from Making Its Stance Clear dated March 5, 2014
  • The beginning of a new Cold War: On Putin’s Beijing visit dated June 6, 2012

China Wins Advantages from All Sides in Ukraine Crisis


Ukrainian Ambassador to China Oleg Dyomin. Photo: Li Hao/GT

Ukrainian Ambassador to China Oleg Dyomin. Photo: Li Hao/GT

In my post “The Mystery of China’s Support for Putin’s Confrontation with US 2” on March 9, I analyzed Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi words: development of the situation in Ukraine to what it is today is regrettable. I pointed out the reasons why he said so. I said in the post, “China regrets that China’s interests may be gravely harmed as China has signed lots of agreements involving $8 billion investment when Yanukovych visited China last December especially for import and joint development of advanced weapons and technology. With those agreements, China will get the technology to build the largest transport aircraft in the world, advanced engines for its light stealth fighter jet, the technology for production and welding of wide thick steel plates for the new aircraft carriers China is building, etc., which are vital for China’s military modernization. In addition, China has already had investment in about 10% of Ukraine’s farm land. All those may be seriously affected.”

However, there is no need to regret now. In his interview with Global Times reporter Li Qian, Ukrainian Ambassador to China Oleg Dyomin said, “The cooperation between Ukraine and China is based on the principle of mutual benefit. We never had disputes in economic or other forms of cooperation. The new government of Ukraine, upon taking power, immediately notified China it would continue all contracts between the two sides.”

Why? Dyomin said, “Here we want to emphasize that the Ukraine values China’s consistent stance on supporting Ukrainian territorial integrity and independence.”

While giving Russia the impression China’s stand is close to Russia’s, China has given Ukraine that it is on Ukraine’s side and support Ukrainian territorial integrity. That is really wonderful.

Ukraine “hopes China, one of the world’s leaders and a partner of Russia, will assist with talks between Ukraine and Russia as an intermediary to tackle issues through negotiations,” Dyomin added.

Now, China’s close stand to Russian is an advantage in maintaining good relations with Ukraine as China can play the role of intermediary.

What about Russia? Has it be offended by China’s attitude towards Ukraine?

Not at all. According to Global Times reporter Li Qian’s exclusive interview with Russian Ambassador Andrey Denisov, Denisov believed that recently the cooperation between China and Russia has reached “new highs” “in all fields.”

He said, “Leaders and foreign ministers of our countries have discussed the current crisis in Ukraine. We are very grateful to China for its balanced and principled position on this issue.”

The US and EU are also happy as China has given vague support to their stance and abstained in UN Security Council’s vote for the resolution against Russia.

Since the US is busy now in Europe, China can put some pressure on Japan and the Philippines. It recently expelled Philippine from a disputed shoal. On March 15, it sent three coast guard ships to form a formation to patrol the sea areas around disputed islands.

China is a sure winner no matter what the outcome of the Ukraine crisis will be.

Sources: Global Times “Ukrainian Ambassador: Build an economy open to East and West” and “Russian Ambassador: Russia not the only victim of sanctions”

Related posts:

  • China: Xi Jinping Skillfully Pleases Russia, US, EU, etc. Concerning Ukraine dated March 11, 2014
  • The Mystery of China’s Support for Putin’s Confrontation the West 2” on March 9, 2014
  • The Mystery of China’s Support for Putin’s Confrontation with the West dated March 8, 2014
  • Cold War Again: Russia Plus China v. US dated March 7, 2014
  • China Is Definitely on Russia’s Side but Refrains from Making Its Stance Clear dated March 5, 2014
  • China paper slams West’s ‘Cold War mentality’ over Ukraine dated February 27, 2014
  • The beginning of a new Cold War: On Putin’s Beijing visit dated June 6, 2012

China Speaks Out to Oppose Sanctions for Its Cold War Ally Russia


Russia's President Vladimir Putin (right) shakes hands with his Chinese counterpart Xi Jinping. Photo: AFP

Russia’s President Vladimir Putin (right) shakes hands with his Chinese counterpart Xi Jinping. Photo: AFP

In my post “China Is Definitely on Russia’s Side but Refrains from Making Its Stance Clear”, I said that China “will support Russia at some critical moments, but will not clearly support Russia now.” At the critical moment when the West is deciding to impose sanctions on Russia, China gives the West the advice to be patient and continue to solve the issue through dialogue. As I said in the post, China hopes “the West may not believe that the situation there is hopeless and stop its confrontation with Russia. The longer the tension there, the greater China will be benefited.”

However, one thing is clear that China joins Russia to oppose the US due to US pivot to Asia but wants good relations with Europe.

The following is the full text of Rueters report titled “China warns of dangerous Russia sanctions ‘spiral’” reflecting China’s support for Russia to play its role as Russia’s Cold War ally:

China’s top envoy to Germany has warned the West against punishing Russia with sanctions for its intervention in Ukraine, saying such measures could lead to a dangerous chain reaction that would be difficult to control.

In an interview with Reuters days before the European Union is threatening to impose its first sanctions on Russia since the Cold War, ambassador Shi Mingde issued the strongest warning against such measures by any top Chinese official to date.

“We don’t see any point in sanctions,” Shi said. “Sanctions could lead to retaliatory action, and that would trigger a spiral with unforeseeable consequences. We don’t want this.”

The interview was conducted on Wednesday, the same day that the EU agreed a framework for sanctions that would slap travel bans and asset freezes on people and companies accused by Brussels of violating the territorial integrity of Ukraine.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel, who has taken the lead in trying to mediate in the crisis, has said the measures, which mirror steps announced by the United States, will be imposed on Monday unless Russia accepts the idea of a “contact group” to resolve the crisis diplomatically.

Using her toughest rhetoric since the crisis began, she warned in a speech in parliament on Thursday that Russia risked “massive” political and economic damage if it did not change course in the coming days.

Russia’s Deputy Economy Minister Alexei Likhachev responded by promising “symmetrical” sanctions by Moscow.

But Shi urged patience, saying the door for talks should remain open even after a referendum on Sunday in which Ukraine’s southern region of Crimea could vote to secede and join Russia. Merkel and other western leaders have denounced the referendum as illegal and demanded that it be canceled.

“We still see a chance to avoid an escalation. The door to talks is still open. We should use this possibility, also after the referendum,” Shi said.

Chinese President Xi Jinping, who will visit Berlin and other European capitals later this month, held separate phone calls on the Ukraine crisis with Merkel and U.S. President Barack Obama earlier this week.

But beyond urging restraint and dialogue, China has shown little public interest in becoming involved diplomatically, a stance that is in keeping with its low-key approach to many international crises.

Still, Ukraine presents Beijing with a dilemma. On the one hand it is a traditional ally of Moscow and has routinely sided with its northern neighbor in major international conflicts. On the other hand, the question of territorial integrity is a tricky issue for the Chinese because of Tibet and Taiwan.

If the West’s confrontation with Russia over Ukraine worsens in the coming weeks, Xi’s visit, the first by a Chinese president to Germany in eight years, risks being overshadowed by the crisis.

Before coming to Berlin, Xi is due to attend a nuclear security summit in the Netherlands which Obama, Merkel and dozens of other world leaders will attend. He is also due to visit Paris and Brussels.

Source: Reuters “China warns of dangerous Russia sanctions ‘spiral’”

Related posts:

  • Will Taiwan Copy Ukraine Revolt, Drive Away Pro-Beijing President, Cause Secession? dated March 13, 2014
  • The Mystery of China’s Support for Putin’s Confrontation with the West dated March 8, 2014
  • The Mystery of China’s Support for Putin’s Confrontation with the West 2 dated March 9, 2014
  • Cold War Again: Russia Plus China v. US dated March 7, 2014
  • China Is Definitely on Russia’s Side but Refrains from Making Its Stance Clear dated March 5, 2014
  • China paper slams West’s ‘Cold War mentality’ over Ukraine dated February 27, 2014
  • The beginning of a new Cold War: On Putin’s Beijing visit dated June 6, 2012

Will Taiwan Copy Ukraine Revolt, Drive Away Pro-Beijing President, Cause Secession?


We have two pieces of Taiwan news similar to the situation before the crisis in Ukraine:

1. 55% Taiwanese regard themselves as Chinese.

2. Lawmakers who do not regard themselves as Chinese fight in parliament those who do over an agreement on closer economic relations with China.

If Taiwanese adopt Ukraine’s way, the opposition minority will take to the street, drive away the president democratically elected and establish their interim anti-Beijing government. The areas in Taiwan where those who regard themselves as Chinese like Crimea in Ukraine, will hold a referendum to merge with China.

Then like the situation in Ukraine, there may be danger of civil war in Taiwan and international tension as US and the West perhaps support the interim government while China supports the separatists.

Taiwan is lucky that such scenario does not emerge.

Why?

Because struggle is not people’s philosophy there while traditionally Chinese advocate harmony instead of struggle.

However, Mao Zedong loved struggle to such extreme that he brought the disasters of the Great Famine and Cultural Revolution to China.

In the United States, the two parties also love struggle. Republicans refused to cooperate with Democrats in Congress in the last two years of Obama’s first term. As a result quite a few of Obama’s attempts to improve American economy could not be approved by Congress. Republicans wanted to prevent Obama from winning a second term by so doing.

Who have suffered? The American people have suffered. However, American politicians do not go to such extreme as Mao; therefore, they do not bring disasters to American people.

People in Ukraine, Thailand, Egypt, etc. are not so lucky, street politics are causing chaos there. Those countries, fortunately, are relatively small, rich and powerful countries can give them aids when the struggle has brought about disasters there.

What about a large country like China or the United States? Who is able to help it?

We Chinese suffered hunger and persecution under Mao but got no help at all from any country in the world!

There must first be the rule of law. So street violence will not prevail to overthrow a lawfully elected government, nor can Red Guards and Rebels persecute innocent people in accordance with Mao’s instructions but in violation of law.

Second, there shall be harmony so that the majority shall respect the minority and avoid harming their interest. They shall make decisions that benefit not only the majority but also the minority. Referendum had better be avoided as it forces majority’s will on the minority, especially when the majority is only a little bigger than the minority. The decision of a small majority may hurt lots of the minority people resulting in endless riots. Such a referendum can never make a country prosper.

The above may be the lessons that we can learn from the Ukraine crisis.

Article by Chan Kai Yee

Related posts:

Brawl in Taiwan’s Parliament over China trade pact March 13, 2014

55% Taiwanese Regard Themselves as Chinese dated March 12, 2014


China: Xi Jinping Skillfully Pleases Russia, US, EU, etc. Concerning Ukraine


Armed men, believed to be Russian servicemen, march outside an Ukrainian military base in the village of Perevalnoye near the Crimean city of Simferopol March 10, 2014.  Credit: Reuters/David Mdzinarishvili

Armed men, believed to be Russian servicemen, march outside an Ukrainian military base in the village of Perevalnoye near the Crimean city of Simferopol March 10, 2014.
Credit: Reuters/David Mdzinarishvili

Russian President Vladimir Putin’s efforts to get a part of Ukraine for restoration of its previous superpower position through the Soviet Union has made Chinese support urgently sought after by almost every power in the world.

First, Putin telephones Chinese President Xi Jinping, then German Chancellor Merkel and US President had telephone conversations with Xi.

It’s really sad for Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe. Neither Putin nor Merkel had telephone conversation with him for his support.

Both China and Japan are located far away from Ukraine and Chinese economy is but a litter bigger than Japan’s, but China’s support is important while Japan’s support can be neglected.

Xi Jinping is obviously on Russia’s side, but he does not offend the US and EU by that. He has even pleased Obama and Merkel. We can clearly see that in the respond of the US and Germany to what Xi Jinping said to Obama and Merkel in the telephone conversations.

US Office of the Press Secretary said in its “Readout of the President’s Call with President Xi of China” that in the telephone conversation, “they affirmed their shared interest in reducing tensions and identifying a peaceful resolution to the dispute between Russia and Ukraine. The two leaders agreed on the importance of upholding principles of sovereignty and territorial integrity, both in the context of Ukraine and also for the broader functioning of the international system.

Wield! Xi Jinping is able to maintain a position close to Russia’s while share interest with the US. Are Russia and the US not confronting each other over Ukraine now?

What did Xi said to give the US such an impression?

Let us analyze what Xi Jinping said to Obama on Ukraine by telephone according to CCTV primetime report.

The following is an accurate translation of the relevant part of the report:

Obama briefed Xi Jinping America’s views on current Ukraine situation. Xi Jinping stressed that China adopted an objective and just attitude towards the Ukraine issue. What is urgent for all the parties to do now is to keep calm and restraint and avoid further escalation of tensions in the situation. They shall persist in resolving the crisis by political and diplomatic means. It is hoped that the various parties concerned satisfactorily deal with relevant differences through communications and coordination and make efforts for a political resolution of the Ukraine issue. China adopts an open attitude to all suggestions and schemes that facilitate easing the tension in Ukraine and is willing to continue to maintain communications with the US and all other parties concerned.

The US is afraid that due to China’s interests in investment and weapon technology in the contracts it signed with former Ukranian President Yanukovych, China may oppose Ukraine’s new government. The US can rest at ease that China now upholds an objective attitude in disregard of its interests.

In addition, due to China’s alliance with Russia, the US is afraid that China may be on Russia’s side especially Russia said Chinese and Russian presidents’ held close positions. However, since Xi said that China adopted a just attitude, China is certainly on Russia’s side.

However, if we read between lines, we find that when Xi heard Obama’s view, Xi stressed China’s objective and just attitude. He hinted that the US failed to adopt an objective and attitude.

It is especially so due to the stress that Xi placed on the objective and just attitude. He hints that US attitude is not objective or just.

Russia will certainly be happy when Chinese diplomats explain the meaning between lines to them.

Xi Jinping has also made Germany happy. Reuter says in its report “China’s Xi urges political solution to Ukraine crisis”, “‘The chancellor explained the situation in Ukraine and efforts to come to a political solution of the conflict,’ German government spokesman Steffen Seibert said in a written statement.

“‘The Chinese president was also in favor of finding such a solution through dialogue,’ the statement said, adding that Xi said the solution needed to be on the basis of international law.”

The following is an accurate translation of Xi’s words in the telephone conversation in CCTV’s report:

Xi Jinping pointed out: Current Ukraine situation is very complicated and highly sensitive. It is necessary to examine, consider and weigh it in its entirety in dealing with it. China is also following the situation closely. We call on all parties to keep restraint, achieve a political solution of relevant differences within a legal and orderly framework through dialogue and negotiations and prevent the situation from escalating. China supports international community’s constructive efforts and actions of mediation in easing up the tension. Xi hopes that the German side will keep on communicating with other parties concerned and give further play to its constructive role. The Chinese side is willing to maintain contact with the German side.

What Xi said certainly pleased Merkel, especially on resolution within legal and orderly framework. For Merkel, it meant that Russia had violated international law and should, therefore, withdraw its troops according to international law and Crimea’s referendum on merger with Russia violates international law.

However, it does not offend Russia at all as Russia said that it had not sent its troops into Crimea and in Xi and Putin’s telephone conversation, Xi told Putin, “he believes Russia will help resolve the issue through political means and maintain regional peace and stability”. Since Xi believes Russia will help resolve the issue through political means, he certainly believes Russia has not sent troops into Crimea.

Moreover, Xi’s requirement for examining, considering and weighing the situation in its entirety means besides respecting Ukraine’s territorial integrity, Crimean people’s right of self-determination shall certainly also be respected. That is precisely what Putin wants.

Sending troops to take Crimea away from Ukraine violates international law, but allowing Crimea to merge with Russia according to Crimean people’s self-determination does not violate international law.

It is very difficult for Xi to maintain his position close to Russia’s while avoiding offending the US and EU, but he has managed to achieve that.

Such skillful handling of the very complex and sensitive issue reflected Xi Jinping’s marvelous wisdom.

In comparison, Shinzo Abe’s stupid visit to Yasukuni Shrine not only infuriated China and South Korea, but also disappointed the US and EU. He has no skill to please any one in the world.

Article by Chan Kai Yee

Sources: CCTV “Xi Jinping had telephone conversation with US President Obama” and “Xi Jinping had telephone conversation with German Chancellor Merkel” (excepts translated from Chinese by Chan Kai Yee), US Office of the Press Secretary “Readout of the President’s Call with President Xi of China” and Reuters “Merkel and Xi agree Ukraine crisis needs to be solved via dialogue”

Related posts:

  • The Mystery of China’s Support for Putin’s Confrontation with the West dated March 8, 2014
  • The Mystery of China’s Support for Putin’s Confrontation with the West 2 dated March 9, 2014
  • Cold War Again: Russia Plus China v. US dated March 7, 2014
  • China Is Definitely on Russia’s Side but Refrains from Making Its Stance Clear dated March 5, 2014
  • China paper slams West’s ‘Cold War mentality’ over Ukraine dated February 27, 2014
  • The beginning of a new Cold War: On Putin’s Beijing visit dated June 6, 2012

The Mystery of China’s Support for Putin’s Confrontation with the West


Russia's President Vladimir Putin (right) shakes hands with his Chinese counterpart Xi Jinping. Photo: AFP

Russia’s President Vladimir Putin (right) shakes hands with his Chinese counterpart Xi Jinping. Photo: AFP

In my post “China Is Definitely on Russia’s Side but Refrains from Making Its Stance Clear” on March 5, I said, “China shall certainly exploit the tension in Ukraine. It will support Russia at some critical moments, but will not clearly support Russia now so that the West may not believe that the situation there is hopeless and stop its confrontation with Russia. The longer the tension there, the greater China will be benefited.

“It is indeed good now that people do not know China’s real stance.

“Therefore, Chinese officials shall be regarded as very clever to give replies to reporters difficult to understand.”

In my post “Cold War Again: Russia Plus China v. US” yesterday, I said I would make detailed analysis of their words today.

First we have to make accurate translation of their words and then we can analyze the meaning between lines. As I have been a legal translator for the largest transnational law firms for decades, I have the expertise to do so.

At the routine press conference of Chinese Ministry of Foreign Affairs on March 7, the spokesman Qin Gang gave comments on US and EU’s view that the referendum on Crimea’s merger with Russia is a breach of international law.

The following is the precise translation from Chinese of the question and answer:

Question: It is reported that the Parliament of the Autonomous Republic of Crimea has announced to hold a referendum within 10 days on whether to merge with Russia. The United States and EU regard it as a breach of international law. Does China have any comment on that?

Answer: We call on all the parties concerned in Ukraine to peacefully resolve the relevant issue within a legal and orderly framework through dialogue and negotiations, earnestly safeguard the legitimate rights and interests of the people of various ethnic groups in Ukraine, recover normal social order as soon as possible and maintain peace and stability in this region (My underline for understanding the meaning between lines).

The meaning between lines:

1. China wants a peaceful solution among various parties in Ukraine as it is the country’s internal affairs; therefore, there is no question of whether the referendum breaches international law or not!

2. It implied that both the US and EU are interfering with other country’s internal affairs. China always advocates non-interference of other country’s internal affairs.

3. What about Russia? Are Russian Troops no in Ukraine to interfere with Ukraine’s internal affairs?

Russia denies the troops in Ukraine are its troops and China believes Russia’s lie to support Russia. China is certainly not so naïve as not to know the truth.

4. When it has been decided by the referendum that Crimea shall merge into Russia, the issue shall be resolved peacefully, i.e. China holds that the Ukrainian troops shall not attack Crimea if Crimea has been annexed by Russia.

The translation of the question and answer about sanctions:
Question: According to reports, the United States and EU are discussing the imposition of sanctions against Russia. Does China supports sanctions against Russia?

Answer: China has consistently opposed being too ready to impose sanctions or using sanctions as a threat in international relations. In the present situation, we hope that all the parties concerned can avoid taking any action to further intensify the tensions and make joint efforts to find a way for the political solution of the crisis. This is the fundamental way out.

The meaning between lines:
1. China opposes the sanctions. In order not to offend US and EU, it explains that it is its consistent stance. It has nothing to do with the issue or the parties concerned; therefore, it shall not offend the US or EU.

It pleases Russia as China opposes sanctions and certainly will not take part in the sanctions.

2. China hopes that all the parties can avoid intensifying the tensions. It implies that sanctions will intensify tensions and shall, therefore, be avoided.

3. China advocates political solution, hinting that neither US and EU nor Russia shall seek a military solution. It implies that Russia now is seeking a political solution as it has denied that it has sent troops into Crimea and China believes that.

Then what if Russia sends troops into other parts of eastern Ukraine and the parliaments there hold referendums to decide merger with Russia? China advocates a political instead of military solution, i.e. the US, the EU and even Ukraine shall not send troops to resolve the issue.

As for other issues, especially China’s attitude towards possible Russian military interference with Ukraine’s internal affairs, I will give accurate translation and analyze the between-line meaning of the spokesman’s words and Xi Jinping’s telephone conversation with Putin tomorrow if I have time.

Source: website of Chinese Ministry of Foreign Affairs “Foreign Ministry spokesman Qin Gang presides over routine press conference on March 7, 2014” (summary by Chan Kai Yee of the report in Chinese)

Related posts:

  • New Cold War: Russia Plus China v. US dated March 7, 2014
  • China Is Definitely on Russia’s Side but Refrains from Making Its Stance Clear dated March 5, 2014
  • China paper slams West’s ‘Cold War mentality’ over Ukraine dated February 27, 2014
  • Putin Wins advantages from Both Sides in Sino-Japanese Conflict” on February 7, 2014
  • Breakthrough in the Establishment of Cold War Partnership between China and Russia dated June 26, 2013
  • The beginning of a new Cold War: On Putin’s Beijing visit dated June 6, 2012