India Worries at Activities of Chinese Warships, Subs in Indian Ocean


While earnestly mending ties with India, China is trying hard to intensify its naval activities in the Indian Ocean to protect its trade lifelines. It is doing so to establish a silk road on the sea but has caused India’s concerns. However, China cannot help that. The following is the full text of Reuters report on India’s concerns at Chinese navy using ports in Sri Lanka:

Chinese submarine docks in Sri Lanka despite Indian concerns

By Shihar Aneez and Ranga Sirilal
COLOMBO Sun Nov 2, 2014 11:32am EST

(Reuters) – Sri Lanka has allowed a Chinese submarine and a warship to dock at its port in the capital Colombo, officials said on Sunday, despite concerns raised by India about China’s warming relations with the Indian Ocean island nation.

Submarine Changzheng-2 and warship Chang Xing Dao arrived at the port on Friday, seven weeks after another Chinese submarine, a long-range deployment patrol, had called at the same port ahead of a visit to South Asia by Chinese President Xi Jinping.

“A submarine and a warship have docked at Colombo harbor. They called on Oct. 31 and will be here for five days for refueling and crew refreshment,” Sri Lankan navy spokesman Kosala Warnakulasuriya said.

“This is nothing unusual. Since 2010, 230 warships have called at Colombo port from various countries on goodwill visits and for refueling and crew refreshment.”

However, the frequency of Chinese visits has become a concern for New Delhi, Indian officials have told Reuters.

“India has raised concerns over this but not aggressively,” an Indian official familiar with diplomatic discussions between the neighbors told Reuters.

China has invested heavily in Sri Lanka in recent years, funding airports, roads, railways and ports, a development that has unsettled India, traditionally the closest economic partner of the island nation of 21 million people.

India has already raised concerns over an aircraft maintenance facility following speculation it could be built in the eastern port city of Trincomalee, which India considers a strategic location in national security terms.

R. Hariharan, a retired colonel from the Indian army and an associate at the Chennai Center for China Studies, said India was concerned about the latest docking of a Chinese submarine at a Sri Lankan port for many reasons.

“For the first time, Chinese submarines are being made part of the PLA (the People’s Liberation Army) in the Indian Ocean Region fleet operation in the Gulf of Aden on anti-piracy, which is not a common practice,” he told Reuters.

A 1987 accord between India and Sri Lanka provides that respective territories – including Trincomalee – will not be used for activities prejudicial to each other’s unity, integrity and security.

Source: Reuters “Chinese submarine docks in Sri Lanka despite Indian concerns”

Related posts at tiananmenstremendousachievements.wordpress.com:

  • China Wants a Base on Maldives in Indian Ocean dated September 16, 2014
  • India Tightens Ties with Vietnam to Counter China’s Entry into Indian Ocean dated September 16, 2014
  • Shanghai Cooperation Organization to Take in India, Pakistan dated September 12, 2014
  • India’s Modi calls for greater cooperation with China dated June 9, 2014
  • China, India sign deal aimed at soothing Himalayan tension dated October 24, 2013

China Wooing India Hard along with Russia


Chinese President Xi Jinping is showing China’s goodwill in India, especially China’s desire to resolve its border dispute with India peacefully and maintain peace along the disputed border before the dispute is solved.

Russia wants a Russia-China-India alliance to counter the US. It seems that there is no way to form such an alliance if the border dispute between China and India has not been solved. Now Russia and China seem to have a new approach. Their Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO) suddenly wants to take in new members after more than a decade of closed door.

By attracting India and Pakistan into SCO, the growing ties between India and China and Pakistan may contribute to the resolution of border dispute and ease of the tension between India and Pakistan. For Russia, it will be a major step to turn SCO into a new Cold War camp to counter the US.

Both India and Pakistan are now SCO observers. Pakistan has submitted its application for joining SCO, but India has not though there have been reports that it has shown great interest in SCO membership.

Xi said in India that China would support India becoming a full SCO member.

At the same time China’s Foreign Ministry released a statement in Beijing that China welcomed both India and Pakistan joining the SCO.

The following is the full text of Reuters report on Xi visiting India:

China’s Xi says determined to settle India border issue

China is determined to bridge differences over its shared border with India, President Xi Jinping said on Thursday, adding that both sides were capable of dealing with fallout from security incidents on the disputed frontier.

“China has the determination to work with India through friendly consultation to settle the boundary question at an early date,” Xi said after summit talks with Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi in New Delhi.

“We also have the sincerity to work with India to maintain peace and tranquility in the border areas before we are finally able to settle the boundary question.”

Xi also said China would support India becoming a full member of the Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO) – a regional security body whose largest members are China and Russia.

China’s Foreign Ministry said in a statement released in Beijing that China welcomed both India and its great regional rival, Pakistan, joining the SCO.

“We welcome and support India and Pakistan to formally become new members of the SCO as early as possible,” the ministry said.

Their admission would boost the group’s ability to maintain regional security, it added, without saying when they might join.

Pakistan is China’s most important ally in South Asia, though Xi had to cancel a trip on his current swing through the region due to ongoing unrest there.

China, Russia and four Central Asian nations – Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan – formed the SCO in 2001 as a regional security bloc to fight threats posed by radical Islam and drug trafficking from neighboring Afghanistan.

Source: Reuters “China’s Xi says determined to settle India border issue”

Related posts:

  • India Warming to China, but Firm in Border Dispute, Enthusiastic in Aiding Vietnam dated September 17, 2014
  • India Tightens Ties with Vietnam to Counter China’s Entry into Indian Ocean dated yesterday
  • India Being Hotly Courted, Difficult for China to Woo dated yesterday
  • Shanghai Cooperation Organization to Take in India, Pakistan dated September 12, 2014
  • India-Japanese Alliance More Likely than Russia-China-India Alliance dated September 9, 2014

India Warming to China, but Firm in Border Dispute, Enthusiastic in Aiding Vietnam


A dog rests on the Indian side of the Indo-China border at Bumla, in the northeastern Indian state of Arunachal Pradesh, November 11, 2009.  Credit: Reuters/Adnan Abidi

A dog rests on the Indian side of the Indo-China border at Bumla, in the northeastern Indian state of Arunachal Pradesh, November 11, 2009.
Credit: Reuters/Adnan Abidi

On the eve of Chinese President Xi Jinping’s India visit, we have Reuters report on India providing loan for Vietnamese arms purchase and exploring for oil and gas in Vietnam’s disputed waters with China.

At the same time, we have an SCMP article that discussing in details the benefits India may get from China in increase in job opportunities, development of industry and construction of infrastructure especially railway.

The two media seem contradicting each other. This blogger, however, believes both media are right. They each describe one aspect of Indian relations with China. They reflect Indian Prime Minister’s wisdom in exploiting the opportunities provided by China’s rise while taking steps to be on its guard against potential threat from China’s rise.

Russia originally wanted to gain advantages from both Japan and China when both countries were trying to win over Russia. However, after the emergence of the conflicts in Ukraine, Russia has tightened its alliance with China and rejected Japan.

Modi, however, got $35 billion loans from Japan while trying to get more from China. It seems he will succeed in gaining advantages from both Japan and China to facilitate improvement of Indian economy.

When two conflicting countries both want to win over a third country, the third country usually finds itself in a dilemma. If it pleases one of the two, it may hurt the other. The best diplomacy is to please both parties and be benefited from its relations with both of them. That certainly requires diplomatic skill. Modi seems to have such rare skill.

Xi Jinping is also well skillful in his diplomacy. He has managed to please both Russia and the West and even Ukraine in dealing with Ukraine issue.

Now, it’s time to test his skill whether he will be able to resolve border disputes with India while providing economic incentive to India during his India visit.

The following is the full texts of the SCMP and Reuters articles:

SCMP: Why Modi’s India is warming to China

When Xi Jinping arrives in India today, he will find in Narendra Modi a leader much more open than in the past to working with China

President Xi Jinping should find the “handshake across the Himalayas” a lot warmer than usual when he starts his India trip today.

As India prepares to overcome the reflexive suspicion of its giant neighbour and open the floodgates to Chinese capital, and Xi respond by opening the chequebook, relations between the two Asian giants are set for, as India’s National Security Adviser Ajit Doval puts it, an “orbital jump”.

From Hindi-Chini bhai bhai (India and China are brothers) to Chindia, rhetoric flies thick and fast when it comes to China and India, as a way of sugarcoating a fraught relationship. But the words of the former spymaster, who was in Beijing last week to finalise the details of Xi’s trip, mirror a deeper churning in India’s strategic outlook in favour of China at a time when China is also gravitating towards India.

“With the incredibly rapid growth of bilateral trade and recent partnerships such as the BRICS (Brazil, Russia, India, China, South Africa), India’s importance to China has risen to a new level. China considers India as one of its most important strategic partners,” says Guo Suiyan, associate professor at the Institute of South Asian Studies in the Yunnan Academy of Social Sciences.

China and India began a cautious détente after shutting each other out for two decades over a border war in 1962 in which India suffered a humiliating defeat. Over the years, they have gradually escalated engagement, especially in trade, but relations have been dogged by mutual suspicion stemming from a contested border and overlapping territorial claims. There are now signs of change.

“India’s strategic circles have noted that the Chinese government has been trying to reach out to India. This has prompted a reassessment of our China policy,” says Jagannath Panda, a research fellow at the Institute for Defence Studies and Analyses in New Delhi.

Though India’s foreign policy has a strong strain of continuity and a reassessment of China has been on for some time, it has picked up pace since Narendra Modi’s rise to power in May. The reasons have as much to do with the new prime minister’s economic priorities as much as his worldview.

Modi came to power largely on the promise of fixing a broken economy. It was his stellar management of the western state of Gujarat and his investor-friendly reputation that propelled his ascent in national politics as India’s once-mighty economic growth slipped under 5 per cent.

Central to the so-called Modinomics is attracting foreign investment and creating manufacturing jobs for millions of young Indians. Between 2004 and 2011, China generated 16 million manufacturing jobs on top of an existing 112 million, says Free University of Brussels professor and author of China and India: Prospects for Peace, Jonathan Holslag. India, in contrast, only created 3 million jobs on an initial total of 11 million. This unemployment problem will only worsen over the years as 6.5 million Indians are expected to join the labour force every year until 2030.

India’s creaking infrastructure and notorious bureaucratic sloth aren’t helping either, forcing even Indian industrialists to look elsewhere. Chinese investment in India amounted to US$657 million in 2012 compared to US$723 million of Indian investment in China. It’s not for nothing that Modi has been asking the world to come and manufacture in India, promising them “red carpet, not red tape”.

China forms an integral component in this jobs focus. As chief minister of Gujarat, Modi successfully drew Chinese capital to his state. Now that he is expected to replicate his so-called Gujarat model of development across the country, he has moved rapidly to remove regulatory hurdles to facilitate Chinese investment on a wider scale. In a country where suspicion of China runs deep, that would require all of Modi’s famed administrative prowess but he has already made substantial progress.

Indian media recently reported that the ministry of commerce and industry has asked the home and external affairs ministries to formulate a clear strategy on China and identify the sectors and regions where Chinese investment is perceived as a security threat. The remaining sectors, according to the commerce ministry, should be thrown open to Chinese investment with a clear-cut policy.

The Financial Express cited a commerce ministry official as complaining that this lack of clarity has meant that India drew only US$313 million of Chinese investment between April 2000 and April 2014 compared with US$20 billion from the UK and US$12 billion from the US.

Perceived security threat is the reason why India’s “strategic assets” such as railways and ports have so far been off-limits for Chinese businesses. After coming to power, Modi has removed the 49 per cent cap of foreign direct investment in railways and made it clear that Chinese investment will be sought in this sector.

China is responding in kind. Liu Youfa, China’s consul-general in Mumbai, has told local media that Chinese firms are eyeing over US$50 billion worth of investments in modernising the Indian railways and running high-speed trains. Xi, he said, would bring with him US$100 billion of investment commitments over five years, nearly three times as much as the US$35 billion secured by Modi on his recent Japan trip.

Japan’s close ties with India are a matter of concern for Beijing, which fears the United States and Japan are trying to pull India into their sphere of influence to contain China.

China will also announce the setting up of two industrial parks specialising in cars and power equipment. Talks are on for two more, specialising in textiles and food processing. Apart from a major boost to jobs and foreign investment, these mega investments are also meant to allay Indian concerns over a skewed trading relationship.

China is India’s biggest trading partner with two-way trade totalling nearly US$70 billion, but India’s trade deficit with China has crossed US$40 billion from just US$1 billion in 2001-02. India also complains about the quality of trade as China buys mostly raw materials from India but sells it finished goods.

According to Holslag, India’s current attitude towards China is similar to China’s attitude towards Japan in the ’70s. “Like China back then, India is desperate for foreign investments to catch up and willing to show more pragmatism towards territorial disputes,” he says, but adds that it may not work out the way India expects.

“China is not yet ready to support a manufacturing boom elsewhere because it is not yet a high-income country and awaits a decade of difficult economic reforms itself.”

But many in India believe a rapidly ageing Chinese population and the country’s decision to move up the value chain and ship out labour-intensive jobs create a rare opening for job-hungry India.

Economics apart, Modi’s China thrust is also a product of his Hindu nationalistic politics that draws inspiration from Asian nationalism. This ideological tilt is the prime source of his attraction to Japan and Singapore as well. It’s also fashioned by his sense of injury over his treatment by the West for his alleged role in a 2002 pogrom against Muslims in Gujarat. While most Western countries, especially the US, wouldn’t give him visa, he has travelled freely in Asia in past years.

China, which he sees as his economic role model and has visited four times, in particular rolled out the red carpet. In a rare show of deference, China even acceded his request in 2011 and freed most of the Indians arrested on charges of diamond smuggling in Shenzhen. China and Modi have long liked each other and make no bones about it.

“There are two factors pushing India towards China. The idea that we need the US in a unipolar world is out. With China’s rise, Russia’s resurgence and the global financial crisis, multipolarity has returned to India’s foreign policy outlook,” said Zorawar Daulet Singh, co-author of India-China Relations: The Border Issue and Beyond. “This ongoing shift away from a US-centric foreign policy has gained momentum as a result of Modi’s Asia-centric views. He plainly rejects the US approach of containing China. In the previous dispensation under Manmohan Singh, there was a degree of reticence vis-à-vis China for fears of US retaliation. Under Modi, there is greater assertiveness.”

The accent on Asia in itself is not altogether new for India. Since 1991, it has pursued a “Look East Policy” to court countries closer home. But here again, there’s been a perceptible change of pace and focus since Modi came to power. External Affairs Minister Sushma Swaraj put it succinctly last month when she declared in Hanoi: “It’s time to not just look but to act. We’ll have an Act East policy.”

This renewed interest in the periphery is also creating greater opportunities for collaboration, particularly because some of Xi’s signature projects are transnational corridors such as the “New Silk Road” that seek to recreate ancient land and sea trading routes.

“For the first time, both countries are in symmetry on the Dengist maxim that stability at home and peace in the immediate common neighbourhood are essential to their modernisation programmes,” says Sourabh Gupta, a senior research associate at Washington-based consultancy Samuels International. “The Chinese were already committed to it. Now New Delhi is coming around to the idea that these corridors are in its national interest.”

According to Gupta, this new engagement will be evident in the coming months as India takes membership of the China-led Shanghai Co-operation Organisation and accepts China’s offer to become a founding member of the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB), with which Beijing plans to fund these corridors.

“For the first time, the periphery is at the core of the relationship between China and India, opening up the Great Game of co-operative possibilities rather than geopolitical checkmating,” says Gupta

Reuters: India says to defend China border after standoff ahead of Xi visit

India said on Tuesday it would firmly defend its 3,500-km- (2,200-mile-) long border with China after domestic media reported a new face-off on the disputed frontier, just days ahead of a visit by President Xi Jinping.

More than 200 soldiers of the People’s Liberation Army crossed into what India considers its territory in Ladakh in the western Himalayas last week, and used cranes, bulldozers and a Hummer vehicle to build a 2-km (1.2-mile) road within it, the Hindustan Times said.

Indian soldiers challenged the Chinese troops and asked them to withdraw, the newspaper said. Then, on the night of September 10, soldiers demolished a temporary track built by Chinese forces.

There was no immediate comment by India’s defense ministry.

Both China and India are trying to put a positive spin on Xi’s first summit meeting with Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi since the Indian leader took office in May. He arrives on Wednesday after touring the Maldives and Sri Lanka.

The two countries are expected to ramp up commercial ties and open the way for Chinese investment in Indian infrastructure, including railways, but the contested border remains a stumbling block to better political ties.

Both lay claim to vast tracts of territory and after two decades of talks are no closer to a resolution of a border dispute over which they went to war in 1962.

They have not even been able to agree on the Line of Actual Control where the two armies are deployed, leading to frequent reports of border violations.

“Let me assure you that our brave sentinels on the border will address any issue that happens on the border,” said foreign ministry spokesman Syed Akbaruddin. “We are confident that our borders are in safe hands.”

Modi and Xi will discuss the border dispute this week, he added.

In Beijing, Hong Lei, a spokesman for the Chinese foreign ministry, said the border issue had not affected the development of two-way ties.

“We hope that both sides can continue efforts to keep maintaining the peace and tranquillity of the border area and create a good atmosphere and good conditions for the development of relations,” he told a daily news briefing.

India has reported a jump in border violations in the past two years that military experts say is a sign of greater Chinese assertiveness on the frontier. The government itself has sought to play down the incursions.

The number of Chinese infringements had reached 334 by August, the government told parliament last month. The corresponding figure in 2013 was 411, while in 2012 it was 426, in 2011 it was 213, and in 2010 it stood at 228.

China denies intruding into Indian territory.

In another wrinkle ahead of Xi’s trip, India on Monday extended a $100-million export credit for defense deals to Vietnam and tightened energy ties with the country, which has strained ties with China, over an increasingly ugly territorial dispute in the South China Sea.

That included a deal to “consolidate” energy cooperation following a 2013 pact under which PetroVietnam offered India’s ONGC oil and gas blocks for exploration and production.

If that pact covered Chinese waters in the South China Sea and any exploration went ahead without China’s approval, Chinese foreign ministry spokesman Hong said the government would be “concerned”.

He added, “We could not support it,” but did not elaborate.

Relations sank to a three-decade low this year after China deployed a $1-billion oil rig to waters Vietnam claims as its exclusive economic zone, sparking a wave of riots and bloody clashes between Vietnamese and Chinese workers in Vietnam.

China claims almost the entire South China Sea, believed to be rich in deposits of oil and gas resources.

Source: SCMP “Why Modi’s India is warming to China”

Source: Reuters “India says to defend China border after standoff ahead of Xi visit”

Related posts at tiananmenstremendousachievements.wordpress.com:

  • India Tightens Ties with Vietnam to Counter China’s Entry into Indian Ocean dated yesterday
  • India Being Hotly Courted, Difficult for China to Woo dated yesterday
  • Shanghai Cooperation Organization to Take in India, Pakistan dated September 12, 2014
  • India-Japanese Alliance More Likely than Russia-China-India Alliance dated September 9, 2014
  • India’s Modi calls for greater cooperation with China dated June 9, 2014

China Wants a Base on Maldives in Indian Ocean


Chinese President Xi Jinping wins Naldives backing for maritime silk route

Chinese President Xi Jinping wins Naldives backing for maritime silk route

When Xi visited Indonesia last year, he raised his idea on reviving the maritime silk road running from China through Southeast Asia and the Indian Ocean to Europe. His true intention may well be to obtain trade related shipping facilities along China’s trade lifelines linking the Middle East and Europe.

The US has a large military base in the Indian Ocean and powerful aircraft carrier battle groups that control China’s trade lifelines; while China, though can use the port facilities in Pakistan and Sri Lanka, has no foothold for its navy and air force there. That makes China’s trade lifelines vulnerable.

China has succeeded in obtaining Maldives’ cooperation in getting a foothold there. However, India regards the Indian Ocean as its sphere of influence. It will certainly do its best to hinder China’s efforts. We can foresee that the geopolitics in South Asia may become very complicated.

The following is The Economic Times’ report on Xi’s success in obtaining Maldives’ support for the maritime silk road:

China’s President Xi Jinping wins Maldives backing for ‘maritime silk route’

MALE: China’s President Xi Jinping secured Maldivian support today for a “21st century maritime silk road” as he began a South Asian tour in the strategically located Indian Ocean atoll nation.

The Maldives is best known for its tourist industry but also straddles major international shipping lanes, and Chinese investment there has grown significantly as Beijing tries to secure vital trade routes.

In a joint statement, the two countries also said they agreed to cooperate on security issues — a potentially sensitive issue in a region traditionally dominated by India. “The Maldives welcomes and supports the proposal put forward by China to build the 21st Century Maritime Silk Road, and is prepared to actively participate in relevant cooperation,” the statement said.

“The two sides agreed to enhance cooperation in other areas, such as marine, economy, and security,” it said without elaborating. Xi is the first Chinese head of state to visit the Maldives since the former British protectorate gained independence in 1965. It is his second meeting with President Abdulla Yameen in a matter of weeks, following their talks last month in the Chinese city of Nanjing.

India has regarded China’s growing influence among its neighbours with concern, leading new Prime Minister Narendra Modi to prioritise regional relationships which critics say the the previous government neglected.

A Maldivian government source said before the meeting that Male was keen to avoid upsetting regional superpower India by bringing up sensitive security issues, since New Delhi considers the islands to be within its sphere of influence.

Yameen said the Maldives was “honoured” to be a part of the trade route initiative, flagged by Xi during a visit to Indonesia last year and intended to revive a route running from China through Southeast Asia and the Indian Ocean to Europe.

The proposal called for increased maritime cooperation between China and Southeast Asian nations, and for China to work with partners to develop ports and other maritime infrastructure.

“I am confident that this is the beginning of an era of heightened and sustained cooperation between the Maldives and China,” Yameen said.

Yameen also secured Chinese support for an ambitious project to build a road bridge between central Male island and nearby Hululle island, where the international airport is located.

Source: The Economic Times “China’s President Xi Jinping wins Maldives backing for ‘maritime silk route’”

Related posts at tiananmenstremendousachievements.wordpress.com:

  • India Tightens Ties with Vietnam to Counter China’s Entry into Indian Ocean dated today
  • India Being Hotly Courted, Difficult for China to Woo dated yesterday
  • Shanghai Cooperation Organization to Take in India, Pakistan dated September 12, 2014
  • India-Japanese Alliance More Likely than Russia-China-India Alliance dated September 9, 2014
  • India’s Modi calls for greater cooperation with China dated June 9, 2014
  • China, India sign deal aimed at soothing Himalayan tension dated October 24, 2013

India Tightens Ties with Vietnam to Counter China’s Entry into Indian Ocean


I said in my previous posts: the US needs not conduct its pivot to Asia to Contain China. China’s rise is not merely US worry but also the worry of all its neighbors. What the US has to do is but to rally all China’s neighbors who feel threatened by China’s rise including Russia, Japan, India, South Korea, etc.

Transfer 10% more US forced to Asia means but providing more targets for China’s saturate anti-ship ballistic and cruise missiles. The US must keep its navy far away from the Chinese coast to avoid being sunk by the missiles launched from Chinese land and from air force and navy based on Chinese coast. What China fears most is blockade of its trade lifelines by US navy in the oceans.

When China’s talented strategist Sun Bin was told by the king of the State of Qi to save the State of Zhao that was under siege by the troops of Wei. Sun did not led his army to fight Wei Troops in the State of Zhao. Instead, he brought his troops directly into the State of Wei to besieg its capital. As most Wei troops had left Wei to besieg Zhao, it was easy for Sun to take Wei’s capital.

Wei troops were forced to retreat from Zhao to defend their capital. In that way, Sun saved Zhao without fighting. That was precisely what Sun Tzu said in his masterpiece The Art of War, “Fighting and winning each and every battle is not the best of best; subduing the enemy without fighting is the best of best.”

The US seems only to know subduing its enemy by fighting. That is why it wants to transfer 10% more of its military force to Asia to contain China. It believes that China’s strategy is A2/AD (anti-access/area denial) and it has to foil that strategy.

As a matter of fact, A2/AD is not China’s strategy. True, China has now developed weapons to destroy US forces near its coast, but that is not China’s overall strategy as that cannot prevent the US from cutting China’s trade lifelines. China’s strategy is to develop overwhelming military force to destroy all US troops whenever they are. Only when its military is so strong can China prevent the repetition of being bullied by foreign powers. US efforts to counter the A2/AD strategy that it puts on China, unfortunately, are regarded by China as bully.

China’s goal is not defeating its enemy on the sea near its coast. It wants to defeat its enemy away from its coast so that the war will not cause any damage to its land and sea areas.

China’s neighbors are clear of China’s ambition. Japan and India are especially clever. Japan has begun to remove its constitutional restriction to its military development.

India’s Modi is very clever. China’s development of good relations with South Asian countries and construction of port facilities in Pakistan and Sri Lanka have alerted India that China will play its role in Indian Ocean. China’s aim is certainly to defend its trade lifelines in the ocean, but India feels threatened.

That is why India has been tightening its relations with Japan and Vietnam since Modi came to power.

China has been busy in improving relations with its neighbors. Its tremendous success is to form an alliance with Russia and use Russia as the leader of a group of countries including China in countering the West headed by the US. Previously, Russia also felt threatened by China’s rise and may well be US ally in containing China.

However, China has so far succeeded in easing tension with only one of the three neighbors that are its potential enemies. Vietnam has sent a special envoy to mend ties with China. Japan is trying hard to mend ties with China but China, though anxious to improve ties, is not willing to mitigate its conditions on improvement of relations. It is still not certain whether China and Japan will hold a summit meeting in November.

Regarding to India, China is much more active than India in its attempt to resolve border dispute and improve bilateral relations with India. Indian Prime Minister Modi is also anxious to improve relations but having been courted by the US and Japan, he willfully gives the impression that he has no enthusiasm for that. Perhaps, he want to avoid displeasing the hardliners at home or he wants to get more concessions from China.

Anyway, Xi’s diplomatic skill will be tested in his coming India visit.

The following is the full text of Reuters’ report on India strengthening ties with Vietnam before Xi’s visit:

India tightens Vietnam defence, oil ties ahead of China Xi’s visit

India extended a $100 million export credit to Vietnam for defence deals and tightened energy ties on Monday, signaling a more confident foreign policy ahead of a visit this week by China’s President Xi Jinping.

India’s new accords with one of China’s rivals for influence in the South China Sea came as Xi visited the nearby islands of Sri Lanka and the Maldives, a reminder of the geostrategic jostling that is becoming an increasing feature in Asia.

During a visit to Vietnam by Indian President Pranab Mukherjee, the two countries said in a joint statement that the credit line would open new opportunities for defence cooperation and that details of what Vietnam would buy were being finalised

“The leaders agreed that defence and security cooperation was an important pillar of the strategic partnership between the two countries,” the statement said.

They also agreed to “consolidate” energy cooperation following a 2013 agreement under which PetroVietnam offered India’s ONGC oil and gas blocks for exploration and production.

India and Vietnam have deepened military cooperation over the past decade and under Prime Minister Narendra Modi, India is pushing ahead with a new strategy to establish itself as an arms exporter using export credits to leverage foreign sales.

The money may help slow-moving talks to sell Brahmos cruise missiles to Hanoi.

Vietnam is building a naval deterrent to China with Kilo class submarines from Russia and it would like to add India’s missile technology to its defences.

India and Vietnam have both traditionally depended heavily on their mutual Cold War partner Russia for military knowhow. The Brahmos itself was developed with Russian help.

REGIONAL COMPETITION

Carl Thayer, an expert on Vietnam’s military at the Australian Defence Force Academy in Canberra, said he believed Vietnam was seeking India’s ship attack variants of the missile.

Indian tests showed the supersonic cruise missile could be successfully fired from ships, which matched Hanoi’s goal of creating a meaningful deterrent against China.

“This is leading-edge technology that would further complicate the ability of the Chinese navy to operate off the Vietnamese coast with impunity, particularly in the south of the South China Sea,” Thayer said.

“The Vietnamese do not want to be in a situation where they wake up one morning and discover the Chinese navy has surrounded one of its bases in the Spratlys,” he said, referring to a disputed island chain.

Business is growing fast between India and China, but the rising powers’ ties are also defined by competition for energy and regional clout, as well as a border dispute that led to war 50 years ago.

Long insecure about China’s strength, India elected Modi in May partly because of his promises to build an economically strong nation that could hold its own on the world stage.

The timing of Mukherjee’s visit to Vietnam may not have been planned to coincide with Xi’s South Asia tour, but it underlined India’s new twin track diplomacy, foreign policy analyst C Raja Mohan wrote in the Indian Express newspaper on Monday.

“Much like China, which does not limit its strategic relationship with Pakistan because of Indian concerns, the Modi government apparently believes it can build a partnership with Vietnam on its own merits without worrying too much about what Beijing might think,” Mohan said in his column.

Also on Mukherjee’s trip, India’s Jet Airways and Vietnam Airlines agreed to start flying between Delhi and Ho Chi Minh City from November 5, via Bangkok.

Xi will be in India from Sept. 17-19.

Source: Reuters “India tightens Vietnam defence, oil ties ahead of China Xi’s visit”

Related posts at tiananmenstremendousachievements.wordpress.com:

  • India Being Hotly Courted, Difficult for China to Woo dated yesterday
  • Shanghai Cooperation Organization to Take in India, Pakistan dated September 12, 2014
  • India-Japanese Alliance More Likely than Russia-China-India Alliance dated September 9, 2014
  • India’s Modi calls for greater cooperation with China dated June 9, 2014
  • China, India Conduct Intensive Discussions to Avoid Border Conflict dated May 6, 2014
  • Chinese and Indian Border Troops Celebrate New Year Together dated January 11, 2014
  • China, India sign deal aimed at soothing Himalayan tension dated October 24, 2013

India Being Hotly Courted, Difficult for China to Woo


The US wants India to encircle China in China’s west; Japan wants India to joint it in confronting China, Russia wants to have a Russia-China-India alliance while China wants to solve border dispute to improve ties with India.

When Modi won the election, he said good relations with China was his priority, but the US and Japan soon invited Modi to visit them in order to win him over.

The US does not seem to have made much progress in mending ties with Modi perhaps because it has snubbed Modi for too long. Japanese Prime Minister Abe seems to have won over Modi perhaps due to his personal friendship with Modi.

In a speech in Tokyo on September 1, Modi said, “The world is divided in two camps. One camp believes in expansionist policies, while the other believes in development. We have to decide whether the world should get caught in the grip of expansionist policies or we should lead it on the path of development and create opportunities that take it to greater heights.”

These words gave the impression that Modi attacked China and joined Japan in confronting China.

Anyway as Japan promised to provide India a loan exceeding $500 million, Modi had to say something to please Abe. His best strategy is to please all the four suitors so as to get benefits from all of them. I believe Modi is clever enough to play such a diplomatic game.

Abe, however, does not rest at ease. He is afraid that with Xi’s charm, Chinese President Xi might win over India when Xi visits India in mid September. Abe visited India in haste to counter Xi’s visit and consolidate the partnership he had built with India.

In its report today, Reuters regard Modi’s recent efforts to develop the disputed border area with China as an action to deal with China. The following is the full text of Reuters report:

With eye on China, Modi’s India to develop disputed border region

India has eased restrictions on building roads and military facilities along its disputed border with China, as the new government seeks to close the gap on its neighbor’s superior transport network and take a stronger stance on Beijing.

Indian environment minister Prakash Javadekar told Reuters he had relaxed environmental rules within 100 km (62 miles) of the contested border in remote Arunachal Pradesh in order to speed up construction of some 6,000 km of roads.

The move, which also allows for the construction of army stations, arms depots, schools and hospitals in the sparsely populated Himalayan region, was announced days before Chinese President Xi Jinping visits India on Sept. 17-18.

“This is about defense preparedness,” said Javadekar. “On the Chinese side of the border, not only have they built good roads, they are building up their railway network. Our army faces problems because of the bad quality of roads,” he added.

Work on the roads will start in the coming months.

India’s shift is consistent with expectations that Hindu nationalist Prime Minister Narendra Modi, who swept to power in elections four months ago, would take a tougher line on territorial disputes with neighboring countries.

Asian great-power diplomacy stirred to life when Modi made clear his intention to play an active role on the world stage by inviting regional leaders to his inauguration in May.

His first bilateral visit outside the region was to Japan, and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe made a two-stop tour of South Asia earlier this month, pre-empting Xi’s trip to the region this week.

“COMPLETE SHIFT IN THINKING”

After taking office, Modi moved quickly to appoint a former army chief as a minister for the northeast border region to accelerate development.

The road building plan marks a significant expansion of infrastructure in far-flung Arunachal Pradesh, a rugged, mountainous, 84,000 square km (32,400 square mile) region that China calls South Tibet.

China has vastly improved roads and is building or extending airports on its side of the border in Tibet.

According to a 2010 Pentagon report, it had placed nuclear-capable intermediate missiles in the area and deployed around 300,000 troops across the Tibetan plateau.

The Modi government’s roads program could aid plans to establish a mountain strike corps of 80,000 troops who can move easily along its border.

The world’s two most populous nations fought a brief frontier war in the area in 1962, and Chinese maps still show all of Arunachal Pradesh within China’s borders.

Indian efforts at development in the region have been relatively restrained in recent years. In 2013, Modi’s predecessor announced plans for 850 km (530 miles) of new roads in the border region, and proposals to upgrade airfields made little headway.

Previous governments deliberately neglected infrastructure in Arunachal Pradesh, partly to create a natural buffer against any Chinese invasion. That policy was dropped when the extent of development on China’s side became clear.

“This is a complete shift in strategic thinking,” said Namrata Goswami, a research fellow at the Delhi-based Institute for Defense Studies and Analyses.

DEPENDENCE AND DISTRUST

The neighbors have a complicated relationship marked by growing economic ties but also distrust, particularly over their unresolved territorial disputes.

The two armies were locked in a three-week standoff in May 2013 in the western Himalayas after Chinese troops set up a camp at least 10 km (6 miles) inside territory claimed by India, triggering calls that India should stand up to its neighbor.

Speaking in Beijing recently, Indian National Security Advisor Ajit Doval, a hawkish former spy chief who has in the past expressed doubts about China’s motives, said the two nations’ disputed border would be discussed during Xi’s visit.

“Both sides have agreed to take steps to ensure the peace and tranquility of the border, and seek a fair, reasonable resolution both sides can accept on the basis of peaceful, friendly talks and consultations,” Chinese Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying told a news briefing on Thursday.

Under the easing of environmental rules, Javadekar said road building within 100 km of the “Line of Actual Control” – the de facto but disputed border between India and China – would be brought under a single general approval scheme, while the amount of reforestation required would be lowered.

India is also pushing ahead with a proposal for electricity projects in states bordering China, and has said it will continue even if international development agencies which had earmarked cash to support the underdeveloped region do not back schemes in areas claimed by China.

Source: Reuters “With eye on China, Modi’s India to develop disputed border region”

Related posts:

  • Shanghai Cooperation Organization to Take in India, Pakistan dated September 12, 2014
  • India-Japanese Alliance More Likely than Russia-China-India Alliance dated September 9, 2014
  • Chinese Top General’s Border Visit Regarded by Indian Media as Strong Warning dated August 8, 2014
  • India’s Modi calls for greater cooperation with China dated June 9, 2014
  • China, India Conduct Intensive Discussions to Avoid Border Conflict dated May 6, 2014
  • Chinese and Indian Border Troops Celebrate New Year Together dated January 11, 2014
  • China, India sign deal aimed at soothing Himalayan tension dated October 24, 2013

India-Japanese Alliance More Likely than Russia-China-India Alliance


China's President Xi Jinping attends a meeting with Venezuela's President Nicolas Maduro (unseen) at Miraflores Palace in Caracas July 20, 2014.  Credit: Reuters/Jorge Silva

China’s President Xi Jinping attends a meeting with Venezuela’s President Nicolas Maduro (unseen) at Miraflores Palace in Caracas July 20, 2014.
Credit: Reuters/Jorge Silva

 

India and Japan have China as a common adversary of border disputes; therefore its is easy for them to form an alliance in countering China. However, unlike Japan, India does not incur Chinese people bitter enmity as the war between India and China in the 1960s was small in scale and gave rise to no significant casualties. However, the war remains a serious obstacle to friendly relations between India and China. Resolution of the border dispute is China’s priority but not India’s.

Russia does not seem to have such influence as it had in the past; therefore, a Russia-China-India alliance is not likely now.

China is building up close relations with India’s neighbors to contain India and its is a China’s wise diplomacy in subduing India. India will certainly try its best to improve its relations with those neighbors. However, just like China’s rise scaring its neighbors, India’s rise also scare its neighbors, especially its traditional rival Pakistan who regards China as its “all-weather friend”.

China has strategic interest in obtaining ports to use along Asia’s Indian Ocean coast for its trade lifelines to the Middle East and Europe while India wants to control the Indian Ocean and may block China’s trade lifelines. There may well be conflict between China and India for the control of Indian Ocean.

Therefore, we cannot believe Assistant Chinese Foreign Minister Liu Jianchao’s words about China not seeking to contain India as according to the current Sino-Indian relations, containing India is in China’s interests. Reuters give a report today on what Liu said before Chinese President Xi Jinping’s India visit. Full text of the report is given below:

Ahead of Xi trip, China says not seeking to contain India

China is not seeking to contain India by military or other means, a senior diplomat said on Tuesday, ahead of a visit by Chinese President Xi Jinping next week to a country with which Beijing has a history of uneasy ties and mutual suspicion.

From economic parity in 1980, China’s growth has outstripped India’s fourfold and Beijing has sought to recycle some of its vast export surpluses into foreign investment in resources and infrastructure in South Asia to feed its industrial machine.

That rising economic presence in the Indian Ocean region has stoked concerns in New Delhi that China is creating a “string of pearls” that surrounds India and threatens its security, including Chinese investments in ports and other key projects in Sri Lanka and Pakistan.

Xi will also be visiting Sri Lanka and the Maldives on his regional tour, which begins later this week with a summit of the Shanghai Cooperation Organization in Tajikistan.

A swing through Pakistan – China’s “all weather friend” in South Asia and traditional rival of India’s – was postponed due to ongoing unrest.

Assistant Chinese Foreign Minister Liu Jianchao said that the leaders of China and India had pledged to work together to manage and control their differences, adding that they shared common interests as large developing nations.

“India is a country with which China has been friendly for thousands of years,” Liu told a news briefing.

“China has never, and will not, use so-called military or other means to try and hem in India,” he added. “There is no strategic competition between China and India in our relationship and there is certainly no such word as ‘surround’.”

A festering border dispute dating back to the 1960s has also hung over relations, despite the close economic and historical links. The two sides fought a brief border war in 1962.

Liu did not signal that there would be a breakthrough on this tricky subject while Xi was in New Delhi, but said the two countries were committed to ensuring a peaceful border.

“Whether the governments or the militaries, both countries have the strong intention to maintain the peace and tranquillity on the border,” he said.

Asian great-power diplomacy has stirred to life since the rise to power of Indian nationalist Narendra Modi, who announced his intent to play an active role on the world stage by inviting regional leaders to his inauguration in May.

China and India have made a particular effort to reach out to each other since Modi’s election, and this will be Xi’s first trip to the country as head of state.

Although Modi seeks pragmatic economic engagement with China, in Tokyo earlier this month he criticized countries with an “expansionist” mindset, a coded jibe against Beijing’s assertive behavior in Southeast Asia.

Last week, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe began visits to Bangladesh and Sri Lanka.

Xi starts his trip in Tajikistan at the Shanghai Cooperation Organization summit.

China, Russia and four Central Asian nations – Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan – formed the group in 2001 as a regional security bloc to fight threats posed by radical Islam and drug trafficking from neighboring Afghanistan.

After that, Xi will traveChina, India sign deal aimed at soothing Himalayan tension dated October 24, 2013
l to the Maldives, Sri Lanka and India in that order, on a visit which ends on Sept. 19, Liu said, without giving exact dates for when he will be in each country.

Source: Reuters “Ahead of Xi trip, China says not seeking to contain India”

Related posts:

  • Chinese Top General’s Border Visit Regarded by Indian Media as Strong Warning dated August 8, 2014
  • India’s Modi calls for greater cooperation with China dated June 9, 2014
  • China, India Conduct Intensive Discussions to Avoid Border Conflict dated May 6, 2014
  • Chinese and Indian Border Troops Celebrate New Year Together dated January 11, 2014
  • China, India sign deal aimed at soothing Himalayan tension dated October 24, 2013

Chinese Top General’s Border Visit Regarded by Indian Media as Strong Warning


General Xu Qiliang

General Xu Qiliang

Qianzhan.com reports today that Xu Qiliang, one of the two Vice Chairmen of China’s top Central Military Commission recently visited border troops in Xinjiang and Tibet including those in Aksai Chin area where there was standoff between Indian and Chinese border troops in May last year.

The website of The Hindu published a report on Xu’s visit on August 5 on Xu’s visit to a company of the border troops involved in the previous standoff between Chinese and Indian troops and the troops guarding the Pangong Tso, a border lake two thirds controlled by China and one third controlled by India. It says that there have been quite a few Chinese invasions into the area controlled by India, but China denied the allegations and pointed out that the trouble was caused by the two sides’ different views on the location of the border.

On July 23, Chinese military’s PLA Daily reported Xu’s inspection of the troops in Hotan, Ngari and Lhasa areas without mentioning the visits to the border areas.

The India media’s report, however, stressed that Xu was the officer of the highest ranking who had ever visited the border areas since long ago. It regards Xu’s visit as the strongest warning to India.

Since China attacked and defeated Indian border troops in the 1960s, India has deployed lots of troops along the border between the two countries and Indian media has always given sensational reports on any suspicious movement of the troops on the Chinese side.

This blogger’s note: From this we shall learn the lesson that a country shall refrain from attacking another country. China attacked India and defeated Indian troops in the 1960s, The war was small in scale and lasted a very short period of time without causing serious casualties. In addition, China soon released all the Indian war prisoners and returned all military equipment it had captured, but the enmity given rise by the war has remained for decades. China has to make great efforts to solve the border disputes with India to remove the enmity.

Source: qianzhan.com “Indian media: PLA general’s shocking appearance at Sino-Indian border to give the strongest warning to India” (summary by Chan Kai Yee based on the report in Chinese)

Related posts:

  • India’s Modi calls for greater cooperation with China dated June 9, 2014
  • China, India Conduct Intensive Discussions to Avoid Border Conflict dated May 6, 2014
  • Chinese and Indian Border Troops Celebrate New Year Together dated January 11, 2014
  • China, India sign deal aimed at soothing Himalayan tension dated October 24, 2013
  • China offers India a ‘handshake across the Himalayas’ May 21, 2013
  • Indian Media’s Sensationalizing News on Chinese Invasion “Entirely Untrue” dated April 26, 2013

Russia-China-India Alliance to Counter the US, Is It Possible?


Wang Yi and Narendra Modi meet in New Delhi. Photo: AFP

Wang Yi and Narendra Modi meet in New Delhi. Photo: AFP

Russian President Putin is glad that there is a de facto alliance with China; therefore, he told reporters in an interview with major Chinese media that Russia-Chinese relations are the best ever now.

He meant the relations are better than in the 1950s when there was a treaty of alliance between the two countries though there is no treaty of alliance now.

To realize his ambition for the restoration of Russia’s status of the former Soviet Union as a superpower rival to the US, the alliance with China is vital for Russia to counter the US.

As India is now a rising emerging economy, an alliance of Russia, China and India will be even more powerful, enough even to drive the US away from Asia.

Chinese history provides much experience of one strongest state forming separate alliance with weaker ones to conquer them one by one and the weaker ones forming alliance to resist the strongest one.

The US perhaps lacks such experience due to its short history so that it fails to use China as an ally to deal with Russia when China has “unrequited love” for it. On the contrary, it turned China away to Russia’s side by its pivot to Asia. As a result, Russia and China gradually formed an alliance that has given rise to the West’s trouble in Ukraine and China’s offensives in the South China Sea.

Media outside China misunderstood China and regarded China as more assertive before China began to take offensives. In fact, China had remained defensive before. The Scarborough standoff took place because Philippine navy began to capture Chinese fishing boats and forbid Chinese fishermen’s fishing there. It was not a case of China being more assertive as described by the media outside China.

Due to US pivot to Asia, the Philippines began to take offensive thinking it could rely on US support. Unfortunate for the Philippines, the US failed to support it. As a result, China took complete control of Scarborough Shoal and forbid fishing by Philippine fishermen there.

Even with such success, China had refrained from adopting its navy’s plan to take Zhongye Island back from the Philippines for fear of harming its relations with the US and ASEAN.

Now, as China has Russia as a reliable ally and as the West is in trouble in Ukraine, China is taking bold offensives at the South China Sea. Its oil rig move signals the beginning of its oil and gas exploitation there and its reclamation for the construction of a naval and air base in the middle of the South China Sea aims at countering US presence at Philippine military bases.

It has now dawned on the US though perhaps too late that other countries are forming an alliance against it, the US has to make some counter moves. The key now is India.

There are problems for the three-country alliance:

First, who shall be the head of the alliance. I have mentioned in my previous post that Chinese President Xi Jinping passed Snowden to Putin to give Putin a clear signal that Xi wanted Putin to be the leader in confronting the US.

As Indea is not strong enough to be the leader, Putin can be certain that he will be the leader of the alliance.

Second, the much trickier problem is the border disputes between China and India.

This time, the US is wise to draw Modi, the newly elected Indian prime minister, to its side. The US has invited him to visit the US in September to drive a wedge between India and China.

Putin is certainly shrewd enough to be aware of that. Due to prolonged good relations between Russia and India, Putin has certainly been doing his best to urge India and China to conciliate.

Xi Jinping is shrewd too. Soon after Modi was elected, he dispatched his foreign minister Wang Yi as his special envoy to visit India.

According to Wang Yi, his visit is an unqualified success.

In its report, Bloomberg quotes Wang Yi as saying to reporters at the end of his two-day visit including a meeting with Indian PM, “Through years of negotiation, we have come to an agreement on the basics of a boundary agreement, and we are prepared to reach a final settlement.”

What is even more worrisome for the US is Wang’s description of “China-India cooperation as a massive buried treasure waiting to be discovered,” Wang said. “The potential is massive.”

India is not less enthusiastic. Its Foreign Ministry says in its website, India “PM emphasized the potential for greater cooperation between India and China for a strong and prosperous Asia, working for mutually beneficial trade and investment as economic partners, joining hands in various areas like counter-terrorism as neighbours, and promoting vigorous cultural exchanges as inheritors of ancient civilizations having extensive historical and spiritual contacts.”

Reuters said in its report yesterday, “Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi urged greater cooperation with China on Monday and said he planned to visit Beijing soon, underlining his administration’s promise to make a new beginning with the country’s giant neighbor.”

US Vice President Biden attaches great importance to relations between country leaders. He has contracted friendship with Xi Jinping since Xi visited the US as China’s vice president. The friendship facilitates his success in his later visit to deal with China’s establishment of East China Sea Air Defense Identification Zone (ADIZ). The visit seemed a failure, but was in fact a success perhaps due to the friendship. I said in my previous post that China was provoking Japan to fight a war with it by the establishment of the ADIZ, but Biden prevented the war by obtaining China’s promise not to fire the first shot. As the US is able to persuade Japan not to fire the first shot, there has so far been no war in spite of the tension.

US relations with Modi are precisely the opposite. While China has cultivated satisfactory friendship with Modi by treating him as state head during Modi’s four visits to China as a weak opposition leader. US leaders did not have the discerning eyes to tell greatness from mediocrity. The US had snubbed Modi for a long time until he was elected Indian prime minister.

Compared with the US, China’s border dispute with India is a great problem, but the potential benefits of economic cooperation are a counterweight to offset the problem. There are no such benefits in US-Indian relations. Therefore, China is in a much better position than the US due to its leaders’ personal relations with Modi.

Biden has the charm to contract friendship with other countries’ leaders that Obama does not seem to have. However, Biden does not seem hopeful to be the next president.

Anyway, the US has to make great diplomatic efforts as Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has been trying hard to improve relations with Russia. Abe has met Putin five times since he was elected. Only one time less than Xi Jinping since Xi became Party General Secretary. Putin wants to sell Japan while Japan wants to buy Russian oil and gas. There are great interests involved.

On the other hand, if Xi Jinping’s reform gives rise to Chinese people’s huge demand for foreign goods, Japan will be America’s fearful competitor for the Chinese market. Under such circumstances, Japan may very likely be drawn to Russia’s side. If that happens, what ally will the US have in Asia? Only the ungrateful Philippines?

Article by Chan Kai Yee

Source: Ministry of External Affairs, Government of India “Chinese President’s Special Envoy calls on Prime Minister”

Source: Bloomberg “China Prepared to Settle India Border Dispute, Wang Says”

Related posts:

  • India’s Modi calls for greater cooperation with China dated yesterday
  • China, India Conduct Intensive Discussions to Avoid Border Conflict dated May 6, 2014
  • China plays down Indian opposition leader’s border remarks dated February 25, 2014
  • Chinese and Indian Border Troops Celebrate New Year Together dated January 11, 2014
  • China, India sign deal aimed at soothing Himalayan tension dated October 24, 2013
  • China offers India a ‘handshake across the Himalayas’ May 21, 2013
  • Indian Media’s Sensationalizing News on Chinese Invasion “Entirely Untrue” dated April 26, 2013

India’s Modi calls for greater cooperation with China


India's Prime Minister Narendra Modi comes out of a meeting room to receive his Bhutanese counterpart Tshering Tobgay before the start of their bilateral meeting in New Delhi May 27, 2014.  Credit: Reuters/Adnan Abidi

India’s Prime Minister Narendra Modi comes out of a meeting room to receive his Bhutanese counterpart Tshering Tobgay before the start of their bilateral meeting in New Delhi May 27, 2014.
Credit: Reuters/Adnan Abidi

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi urged greater cooperation with China on Monday and said he planned to visit Beijing soon, underlining his administration’s promise to make a new beginning with the country’s giant neighbor.

India and China have rapidly expanded commercial relations in recent years but political ties remain difficult, after a dispute over their Himalayan border that led to a war in 1962.

But Modi, who took power last month, is seeking to engage with India’s neighbors, including China. A peaceful and stable neighborhood would help him pursue his economic goals at home.

On Monday, he met Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi, who was visiting India as a special envoy of China’s president to build ties with the new administration in New Delhi.

On Sunday, Wang had a meeting with his Indian counterpart, Sushi Sward, that lasted more than three hours. It was the first high-level engagement between the two countries since Modi assumed office.

“The two sides will remain in touch through the diplomatic channel to make necessary arrangements for these visits and for other meetings and exchanges of leaders on the sidelines of multilateral summits,” the Indian foreign office said in a statement after Wang’s meeting with Modi.

It gave no other details. Modi has already invited Chinese President Xi Jinping to visit New Delhi later this year.

India was once viewed as a rival to China’s economic juggernaut. Both the economies have slowed in the past two years, but India’s slowdown has been dramatic.

Asia’s third-largest economy grew 4.7 percent in the fiscal year that ended in March. That was the second straight year of sub-5 percent growth, the longest slowdown in more than a quarter of a century.

Modi, who last month won the strongest parliamentary majority in the past 30 years on a promise of economic revival and jobs, wants to push infrastructure and skill development – a model followed by China to boost economic growth – to promote a turnaround.

“Scale, skill and speed. If these three strengths we can stress upon, then we can rise to the challenge of competing with China,” he said at a book launch event on Sunday.

Source: Reuters “India’s Modi calls for greater cooperation with China”

Related posts:

  • China, India Conduct Intensive Discussions to Avoid Border Conflict dated May 6, 2014
  • China plays down Indian opposition leader’s border remarks dated February 25, 2014
  • Chinese and Indian Border Troops Celebrate New Year Together dated January 11, 2014
  • China, India sign deal aimed at soothing Himalayan tension dated October 24, 2013
  • China offers India a ‘handshake across the Himalayas’ May 21, 2013
  • Indian Media’s Sensationalizing News on Chinese Invasion “Entirely Untrue” dated April 26, 2013