The Enigma of China’s Establishment of East China Sea ADIZ


China does not have the strength to force US and Japanese air forces to respect China’s East China Sea Air Defense Identification Zone (ADIZ). Then why did it establish it? To prove Chinese air force’s weakness?

Certainly not. Chinese leaders were not as stupid as that.

China was provoking Japan to fight a war by its establishment of the ADIZ. At that time, there is popular desire among Chinese people to fight a war against Japan to revenge China’s defeat in the first Sino-Japanese war 120 years ago.

In one of my post on that event, I cited the story of Emperor Shizong of the Late Zhou Dynasty, one of the greatest emperors in Chinese history, who established a strong powerbase from nothing soon after succession to the throne by winning an unexpected victory against a strong enemy. At that time, facing strong resistance against his thorough reform and anti-corruption and mass-line campaigns, Chinese President Xi Jinping needed such a victory and China was capable to wipe out US aircraft carrier battle groups near its coasts with saturate anti-ship ballistic and cruise missiles.

To prevent US retaliation with nuclear weapons, China began to show off its strategic nuclear submarines and submarine-launched ICBMs in addition to land-based mobile ICBMs that are able to conduct surprise counter nuclear attack minutes after they leave the 5,000 km tunnels China has built for second strike.

At that time, if Japan had fired the first shot, there would certainly have been a war. Why? China’s guiding philosophy now is a mixture of Marxism and China’s traditional Confucianism.

There is Confucius sage Mencius’ well-known saying on war in the Chinese classic Mencius: “Favorable timing is not as good as geological advantage, while geological advantage is not as good as popular support.”

Before entering a war, Chinese strategists have to consider whether there are the three essential factors of timing, geological advantage and popular support for winning a war.

The timing is good as at that time South Korea had been upset by Japanese Prime Minister’s visit to Yasukuni Shrine and Sino-Russian relations had been the best ever. No countries will support Japan in the war except the US while China my get Russia’s support in the war.

The geological advantage is obvious: China would have been fighting near its coast with strong support of land-based missiles and aircrafts while the US would have been fighting an expensive war far away from its homeland with logistic difficulties.

Finally, the most important factor: popular support. The US failed in the Korean War, Vietnamese War, and its wars of invasion into Iraq and Afghanistan not because of insufficient military or financial power, but due to lost of popular support in prolonged wars. American people do not want to fight a war, especially a prolonged war! In fact, no people in whatever country support a prolonged war; therefore, it is better not even to begin a war. Xi, however, may make the war short by destroying Japan with China’s over 1,000 intermediate missiles.

However, Xi was wise that he promised to refrain from firing the first shot when US Vice President Joe Biden had a long talk with Xi during Biden’s Beijing visit. He knew that the US would not support Japan if Japan fired the first shot.

As a result, Xi won without fighting a war as previously Japan had sole administration of the disputed Diaoyu (known in Japan as Senkaku) Islands. By that time, Chinese warships and aircrafts patrolled the areas around the islands and Japan was unable to stop the patrols as the US would not support Japan if Japan started the war. The US even regarded it as stupid to fight a war for a few “rocks”.

In addition, China has included the disputed areas in its ADIZ. That certainly pleased Chinese people and won Xi popularity.

China wants Japan to admit but Japan refuses to admit that there are disputes over those islands, but China’s actions prove Japan’s de facto admit of the existence of the disputes.

The truth beneath Xi’s enigma of brinkmanship is Xi’s success in winning popularity at home for establishment of his powerbase and making Japan accept as routine Chinese patrol of the areas.

There is no need for his brinkmanship any more now as Xi has initially established his powerbase with his successful mass-line and anti-corruption campaigns and commencement of his thorough reforms.

Regarding China’s confrontation with Japan, Xi has achieved what China’s gifted strategist Sun Tze upholds in his The Art of War: “Subduing the enemy without fighting is the best of the best.”

However, I have to point out the danger of a fierce war remains due to Chinese people bitter remembrance of their great grandparents’ sufferings during Japanese invasion of China.

Without sufficient repentance, Japan is still faced with the danger of attack of its homeland by China’s more than 1,000 intermediate missiles, which may destroy Japan even with conventional warheads as Japan’s anti-missile capabilities are not enough to intercept most of them.

Chinese people will not support their leaders if China uses all those missiles to destroy any other countries or regions including Taiwan to cause heavy civilian casualties but Japan is the only exception due to Japan’s war crimes in China decades ago.

Source: Chinese classics Mencius and The Art of War (translation of excerpts from Chinese by Can Kai Yee)


China’s secretive military cracks open door for glimpse inside


A tank is driven down a slope during an organised media tour at a People's Liberation Army (PLA) engineering academy in Beijing July 22, 2014.  Credit: REUTERS/Petar Kujundzic

A tank is driven down a slope during an organised media tour at a People’s Liberation Army (PLA) engineering academy in Beijing July 22, 2014.
Credit: REUTERS/Petar Kujundzic

With dancing robots and smiling soldiers and to the strains of British singer George Michael, China cracked open the door on its secretive armed forces on Tuesday during Beijing’s annual attempt to assuage worries about its growing military might.

China has jangled regional nerves over the past few months with an increasing assertiveness over territorial disputes in the East and South China Seas, set against the backdrop of rising defense spending.

But on a yearly trip for foreign reporters to a Chinese military base, this time to an engineering academy in Beijing’s southwestern suburbs, officers went to great lengths to put a non-threatening face on the world’s largest military.

“It is not necessary to pick an enemy or an opponent for combat while developing ones military. I think the People’s Liberation Army’s development is in line with China’s overall development,” base commander Xu Hang told reporters.

During a carefully escorted tour of the leafy base, soldiers stopped to chat and patiently answer questions about everything from their salary to why they wanted to join up.

At one point a group of cadets proudly showed off miniature dancing robots they had designed, as piped Western pop music played in the background, including a musak-version of George Michael’s “Careless Whisper”.

“When I was small I wanted really badly to be a soldier,” said a beaming Liao Guofeng, 26. “In China soldiers get respect and now my dream has come true.”

The base, though, exists for a more serious purpose — to train up and coming officers for leadership with a specific focus on tanks.

The base also sits very close to one of China’s most potently symbolic sites, the Marco Polo Bridge, where a skirmish in 1937 sparked an all-out Sino-Japanese war and which today is a place of somber remembrance.

China-Japan ties are at the lowest ebb in years due not only to the dispute over a group of uninhabited islets in the East China Sea, but also friction over a shared bitter wartime past.

Commander Xu said his cadets made regular visits not only to the bridge but other places of historic importance.

“It is a normal practice for us to educate cadets about the fine traditions of the People’s Liberation Army and bring them to important locations that tell the history of the military and the country,” he added.

Despite the military’s attempts at openness — this visit was the seventh of its kind for foreign journalists — a culture of secrecy and suspicion remains deeply embedded in China.

That had added to concern that China is not telling the whole truth when it comes to defense spending, a figure that this year will rise by 12.2 percent to 808.2 billion yuan ($130 billion), a number many governments and analysts say is not representative of the country’s true defense outlays.

Defense Ministry spokesman Geng Yansheng brushed off such worries, saying Beijing was committed to transparency and explaining itself to the outside world.

“We’ve noticed in recent years that along with China’s international influence increasing so has exposure globally to its military. But there are some reports on China’s military which are not quite accurate or are mistaken,” he told reporters. “So giving foreign reporters this experience is extremely necessary.”

Still, Geng prevaricated when asked if next year’s trip might be to visit China’s first aircraft carrier, the Liaoning.

“I can’t say that this possibility does not exist,” Geng said. “At this time of year there are lots of military exercises going on, so perhaps going now would not work.”

($1 = 6.2061 Chinese Yuan)

Source: Reuters “China’s secretive military cracks open door for glimpse inside”


NATO’s advice to Japan: “Become a Pro-active Contributor to Peace”


NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe (L) address a joint news conference at the Alliance headquarters in Brussels May 6, 2014.  Credit: Reuters/Francois Lenoir

NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe (L) address a joint news conference at the Alliance headquarters in Brussels May 6, 2014.
Credit: Reuters/Francois Lenoir

In Reuter’s report “Japan, worried about China, strengthens ties with NATO”, Abe hinted in his speech to 28 ambassadors to NATO that Japan’s disputes with China over the Diaoyu Islands (known as Senkakus in Japan) is similar to the situation in Ukraine.

However, his efforts to win NATO support were made in vain as he got the advice from NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen to “become a pro-active contributor to peace”, hinting that you had better avoid starting a war with China.

There is a report titled “Why Japan’s smaller military could hold its own against China” at chinadailmail.com that stresses Japanese military’s “significant qualitative advantage”. It makes me worry that Japan may start a war with China due to China’s provocation in sending coast guard ships and aircrafts to the disputed waters and establishment of the East China Sea Air Defense Identification Zone. War is especially imminent as Japan may gradually lose its advantage due to the rapid growth of China’s military strength. I have the impression that Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s visit to NATO aimed at seeking NATO support for its war.

However, NATO ignored his comparison of Ukraine to the disputed islands and gave the advice to maintain peace. Being isolated in his pursue for war with China, there is little chance that Abe will start a war with China in spite of Japanese military’s “significant qualitative advantage”.

The following is the full text of Reuter’s report.

Japan, worried about China, strengthens ties with NATO

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, concerned about China’s rising military spending and disputes with Beijing over islands in the East China Sea, signed a new partnership agreement with NATO on Tuesday.

The accord, signed by Abe and NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen during Abe’s visit to NATO’s Brussels headquarters, will deepen Japan’s cooperation with the Western military alliance in areas such as counter-piracy, disaster relief and humanitarian assistance.

After addressing ambassadors from the 28 NATO nations, Abe drew a parallel between the situation in Ukraine, where Russia has occupied and annexed Crimea, and Asia, in an apparent allusion to a standoff between Beijing and Tokyo over tiny uninhabited islands in the East China Sea known as the Senkaku in Japan and the Diaoyu in China.

“We will not tolerate any change of status quo through intimidation or coercion or force. This is not only applicable to Europe or Ukraine. This is applicable to East Asia and it is applicable to the whole world,” Abe said at a joint press conference with Rasmussen.

Abe urged Russia and Ukraine’s political parties to recognize the legitimacy of Ukraine’s May 25 presidential election, which the West sees as crucial to help stabilize Ukraine after weeks of worsening violence that Western officials accuse Russia of helping to stir up.

“At the same time, in order to resolve this problem, we have to have dialogue with Russia,” Abe said.

NATO has said it will not get involved militarily in Ukraine but it has reinforced security in eastern European members of NATO that are worried by Russia’s renewed assertiveness.

In addition to steps it has already taken to deploy more planes, ships and troops to eastern Europe, NATO would “not hesitate to take further steps if necessary to ensure effective defense and protection of our allies,” Rasmussen said.

BOLSTERING SUPPORT

Abe, who made his first visit to NATO headquarters in 2007, has long been interested in strengthening Japan’s relations with the U.S.-dominated Western alliance.

Analysts say Japan’s aim is to increase diplomatic support over its security concerns, particularly China’s military buildup and North Korean missile launches and nuclear tests.

“Japan does not actually expect NATO to play a direct military role in the Asia-Pacific region, but it does expect allies to share perceptions and approaches,” Michito Tsuruoka, a senior research fellow at Japan’s National Institute for Defense Studies, wrote in a paper for the NATO Defense College last year.

Tension between Japan and China spiked last year when Beijing announced an air-defense zone over a wide area including the disputed islands.

Abe told NATO ambassadors he believed Japan should play a more active role in defending the freedom of overflight and navigation.

With its operations in Afghanistan coming to an end and Russia flexing its muscle, NATO is now expected to refocus on its core mission of defending its territory, a trend that may not be welcome to Japan and other partners outside NATO’s area.

Abe’s priority has been to revive a long-sluggish economy, but he has also pledged to strengthen Japan’s military and boost its security profile to meet what he says is a threat from China’s rapid military buildup.

Abe also aims to lift Japan’s ban on collective self-defense, which means helping an ally under attack, to bolster security ties with the United States.

Rasmussen said NATO welcomed Japan’s steps “to become a pro-active contributor to peace”.

“We share interests in countering piracy, countering terrorism. We share interests in disarmament,” he said.

Source: Reuters “Japan, worried about China, strengthens ties with NATO”

Related posts:

  • China Gives Order to Commence War with Japan ‘if It Is Appropriate to Fight’ dated February 23, 2014
  • Sino-Japanese War a Reality: Japan to Force down Chinese Fighter, Arrest Its Pilot dated February 1, 2014
  • Japanese PM Abe, Chinese President Xi Jinping Both Want a War. Can It Be Avoided? dated January 25, 2014
  • China Does Not Budge in its Brink of War Policy on Air Defense Identification Zone dated December 5, 2013
  • Signals of Beijing’s Determination to Fight for Diaoyu Islands dated November 26, 2013

Japan to conduct island defense drill amid tension with China


A group of disputed islands, Uotsuri island (top), Minamikojima (bottom) and Kitakojima, known as Senkaku in Japan and Diaoyu in China is seen in the East China Sea, in this photo taken by Kyodo September 2012.  Credit: Reuters/Kyodo

A group of disputed islands, Uotsuri island (top), Minamikojima (bottom) and Kitakojima, known as Senkaku in Japan and Diaoyu in China is seen in the East China Sea, in this photo taken by Kyodo September 2012.
Credit: Reuters/Kyodo

Japan will conduct a military exercise this month to practice defending an island, the Defense Ministry said on Thursday, underscoring concern about East China Sea islands controlled by Japan but claimed by China.

The dispute over the islands, called the Senkaku in Japan and Diaoyu in China, has raised fears of a clash between the Asian neighbors which could even drag in the United States.

Separately, China said on Wednesday it would carry out naval exercises with Russia in the East China Sea in what it called a bid to deepen military cooperation.

Japan’s Defense Ministry said the island defense exercise would run from May 10 to May 27 on a small uninhabited island in the Ryukyu chain, some 600 km (375 miles) northeast of the disputed isles.

Some parts of the exercise will be held in southwestern Japan’s Nagasaki prefecture and waters off Okinawa Island’s east coast. Okinawa is home is a major U.S. military base and Japan also bases forces there.

It will be the first time that Japan’s military, known as the Self-Defense Forces, will use an actual island for island defense training involving its ground, air and maritime divisions.

About 1,300 troops, as well as several fighter jets and destroyers, will practice landing on and retaking the island, the ministry said.

But it said the exercise was not a response to the tension with China.

“Boosting island defense is something that has been mentioned in the defense white paper in recent years. This is not a drill that is responding to the current security situation surrounding Japan,” a ministry spokesman said.

U.S. President Barack Obama said last month while on a visit to Japan that the disputed islands were covered by a U.S.-Japan security treaty, angering China.

Last month, Japan announced it would break ground on a radar base in the area, on a tropical Japanese island close to Taiwan.

The radar station on Yonaguni Island, just 150 km (93 miles) from the disputed islands in the East China Sea, marks Japan’s first military expansion at the western end of its island chain in more than 40 years.

Source: Reuters “Japan to conduct island defense drill amid tension with China”

Related posts:

  • China to conduct naval drills with Russia in East China Sea dated May 1, 2014
  • Obama Not to Commit Direct Military Involvement if China Takes Diaoyus by Force dated today
  • China says no room for compromise with Japan on history, territory dated March 8, 2014
  • China Has Made Full Preparations for War with Japan dated March 3, 2014
  • China Gives Order to Commence War with Japan ‘if It Is Appropriate to Fight’ dated February 23, 2014
  • US Not Willing to Be Drawn into War by Japan or Philippines dated February 11, 2014
  • The US Will Be the Biggest Winner if Japan Is Defeated by China in the War dated February 5, 2014
  • The beginning of a new Cold War: On Putin’s Beijing visit dated June 6, 2012

Obama reaffirms commitment to Japan on tour of Asia allies


1 of 8. U.S. President Barack Obama shakes hands with Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe (R) at a joint news conference at the Akasaka Palace in Tokyo April 24, 2014.  Credit: Reuters/Larry Downing

1 of 8. U.S. President Barack Obama shakes hands with Japan’s Prime Minister Shinzo Abe (R) at a joint news conference at the Akasaka Palace in Tokyo April 24, 2014.
Credit: Reuters/Larry Downing

In my post today titled “Obama Not to Commit Direct Military Involvement if China Takes Diaoyus by Force”, I said Obama’s reply to a reporter’s question whether the US would consider using military force were China to have some sort of military incursion in those islands to protect those islands, Obama skillfully hid his dilemma: He wants to assure Japan that the US will honor its commitments while he has no intention at all to be militarily involved if China takes the “rocks” by force. Why? It is simply not worthwhile. Who is so stupid as to shed his country’s youngsters’ blood for another country’s “rocks”.

Obama’s skill has made Reuters believe that Obama will defend Japan if China takes the Diaoyus by force. Reuters gives its report the title “Obama reaffirms commitment to Japan on tour of Asia allies” to show it has been fooled by Obama’s skillful rhetoric. The following is the full text of Reuters’ report:

U.S. President Barack Obama assured ally Japan on Thursday that Washington was committed to its defense, including of tiny isles at the heart of a row with China, but denied he had drawn any new “red line” and urged peaceful dialogue over the islands.

His comments drew a swift response from China, which said the disputed islets were Chinese territory.

Obama also urged Japan to take “bold steps” to clinch a two-way trade pact seen as crucial to a broad regional agreement that is a central part of the U.S. leader’s “pivot” of military, diplomatic and economic resources towards Asia and the Pacific.

U.S. and Japanese trade negotiators failed to resolve differences in time for Obama and Prime Minister Shinzo Abe to shake hands on a deal at the summit.

The leaders reported progress, but Japan’s economics minister, Akira Amari, said later that remaining sticking points could not be resolved quickly.

Obama, on the start of a four-nation tour, is being treated to a display of pomp and ceremony meant to show that the U.S.-Japan alliance, the main pillar of America’s security strategy in Asia, is solid at a time of rising tensions over growing Chinese assertiveness and North Korean nuclear threats.

“We don’t take a position on final sovereignty determinations with respect to Senkaku, but historically they have been administered by Japan and we do not believe that they should be subject to change unilaterally and what is a consistent part of the alliance is that the treaty covers all territories administered by Japan,” Obama said.

“This is not a new position, this is a consistent one,” he told a joint news conference after his summit with Abe, using the Japanese name for the islands that China, which also claims sovereignty over them, calls the Diaoyu.

“In our discussions, I emphasized with Prime Minister Abe the importance of resolving this issue peacefully,” Obama added.

Whilst his comments amounted to a restatement of longstanding U.S. policy, there was symbolism in the commitment being stated explicitly by a U.S. president in Japan.

Responding to Obama’s remarks, Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Qin Gang told a daily press briefing in Beijing that the islands belonged to China.

“The so-called U.S.-Japan security treaty is a product of the Cold War era and it cannot be aimed at a third party and ought not to harm China’s territorial sovereignty,” he said.

“No matter what anyone says or does, it cannot change the basic reality that the Diaoyu Islands are China’s inherent territory and cannot shake the resolve and determination of the Chinese government and people to protect (our) sovereignty and maritime rights.”

INTERNATIONAL RULES

Obama also said there were opportunities to work with China – which complains that his real aim is to contain its rise – but called on the Asian power to stick to international rules.

“What we’ve also emphasized, and I will continue to emphasize throughout this trip, is that all of us have responsibilities to help maintain basic rules of the world and international order, so that large countries, small countries, all have to abide by what is considered just and fair,” he said.

Some of China’s neighbors with territorial disputes with Beijing worry that Obama’s apparent inability to rein in Russia, which annexed Crimea last month, could send a message of weakness to China.

Obama told the news conference that additional sanctions were “teed up” against Russia if it does not deliver on promises in an agreement reached in Geneva last week to ease tensions in Ukraine.

Obama and Abe also agreed that their top trade aides, U.S. Trade Representative Michael Froman and Amari, would keep trying to narrow gaps in their trade talks.

“This is not something we can reach a conclusion (on) in a short period of time,” Amari told reporters after meeting Froman again after the leaders’ summit.

Abe has touted the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) as key to the “Third Arrow” of his economic program to reinvigorate the world’s third-biggest economy, along with hyper-easy monetary policy and fiscal spending.

Both sides have also stressed that the TPP would have strategic implications by creating a framework for business that could entice China to play by global rules.

But the talks have been stymied by Japan’s efforts to protect politically powerful agriculture sectors such as beef, and disputes over both countries’ auto markets.

Pointing to restrictions on access to Japan’s farm and auto sectors, Obama said: “Those are all issues that people are all familiar with and at some point have to be resolved. I believe that point is now.”

Experts had said failure to reach a final deal could cast doubts on Abe’s commitment to economic reform and take the wind out of the sails of a drive for a broader TPP agreement.

“If they don’t show progress … it will be harder to use TPP as a spur to reforms,” said Robert Feldman, a managing director at Morgan Stanley MUFG Securities in Tokyo. “It gives the anti-reform forces aid and comfort.”

DIPLOMATIC CHALLENGE

The diplomatic challenge for Obama during his week-long, four-nation regional tour is to convince Asian partners that Washington is serious about its promised strategic “pivot”, while at the same time not harming U.S. ties with China, the world’s second-biggest economy.

Obama will also travel to South Korea, Malaysia and the Philippines.

Abe – who repeatedly referred to the U.S. president as “Barack” during their news conference – and Obama were keen to send a message of solidarity after U.S-Japan ties were strained by Abe’s December visit to Tokyo’s Yasukuni Shrine, seen by critics as a symbol of Japan’s past militarism.

Japan lobbied hard to get the White House to agree to an official state visit, the first by a sitting U.S. president since Bill Clinton in 1996.

Abe is trying to soothe U.S. concerns that his conservative push to recast Japan’s war record with a less apologetic tone is overshadowing pragmatic policies on the economy and security.

“Seventy years ago, when the war ended, Japan gave grave damage and pain to many people, particularly people in Asia. Japan started taking post-war steps by reflecting on this. Japan and Japanese people have continued to take the path of peace for the past 70 years,” Abe told the joint news conference.

“Japan has strived to create a free and democratic country after the war. We have been building a country that respects human rights and the rule of law,” he said.

Source: Reuters “Obama reaffirms commitment to Japan on tour of Asia allies”

Related posts:

  • Obama Not to Commit Direct Military Involvement if China Takes Diaoyus by Force dated today
  • Japan, US differ on China in talks on ‘grey zone’ military threats dated March 10, 2014
  • China says no room for compromise with Japan on history, territory dated March 8, 2014
  • China Has Made Full Preparations for War with Japan dated March 3, 2014
  • China Gives Order to Commence War with Japan ‘if It Is Appropriate to Fight’ dated February 23, 2014
  • US Not Willing to Be Drawn into War by Japan or Philippines dated February 11, 2014
  • The US Will Be the Biggest Winner if Japan Is Defeated by China in the War dated February 5, 2014
  • The Mystery of What Biden Has Got in His Beijing Visit dated December 6, 2013

Obama Not to Commit Direct Military Involvement if China Takes Diaoyus by Force


Obama shaking hands with Abe

Obama shaking hands with Abe

It is very interesting that China’s official media CRI Online’s version of US President Obama’s words in reply to a reporter’s question what should be done if China sent troops to the Diaoyu Islands is quite different from the version in White House Office of Press Secretary’s Immediate Release on April 24.

CRI Onlne says in its special report: According a report on the news website of Japan’s NHK on April 24, when Obama was asked “whether US troops will be directly involved if China takes military action for the Diaoyu Islands”, Obama said that not all military conflicts require US troops’ involvement.

First the reporter’s question is quite different in White House’s version. In the Immediate Release, the question is “in regards to the Senkaku (known as Diaoyu in China) Islands, I just want to make sure that this is absolutely clear. Are you saying that the U.S. would consider using military force were China to have some sort of military incursion in those islands to protect those islands?”

In the Immediate Release, Obama replied, “With respect to the other issues that you raise, our position, Jim, the United States’ position is that countries should abide by international law; that those laws, those rules, those norms are violated when you gas children, or when you invade the territory of another country. Now, the implication of the question I think is, is that each and every time a country violates one of those norms the United States should go to war, or stand prepared to engage militarily, and if it doesn’t then somehow we’re not serious about those norms. Well, that’s not the case.”

Obama’s answer in the above paragraph is absolutely unclear. He said before the questions and answers section of the press conference, “We don’t take a position on final sovereignty determinations with respect to Senkakus”. Since the US does not regard the islands as Japanese territory, if China takes military action, it is not invasion of another country’s territory, but the resolution of territorial dispute by force. Therefore, what Obama said about a country violating on of those norms is entirely irrelevant.

It is not a case that “each and every time a country violates one of those norms the United States should go to war, or stand prepared to engage militarily”.

Obama said nothing about whether the US “would consider using military force”. What he made clear was that it is even less necessary for the US to be militarily involved as China’s invasion of the Diaoyus does not violate any of the norms he referred to.

However according to CRI Online’s version Obama produced a forced smile at the reporters question what should be done if China sent troops to the Diaoyu Islands and said, “that is a very difficult question that I am afraid I am unable to answer. The treaty between the United States and Japan preceded my birth; therefore, I am ignorant of lots of its background. I only believe that according to the tenets of the treaty, the territories under the administration of Japan are covered under the treaty.

“However, I’ve stressed in my talks with the Prime Minister that there should be no escalation of the confrontation between Japan and China and it is necessary to develop measures to improve Japan-Chinese relations. The U.S. is willing to provide diplomatic assistance.” In addition, Obama said, “Not all military conflicts require US military involvement.”

I do not know whether CRI Online’s version is an inaccurate translation of NHK report. If so it is the Japanese media that has distorted Obama’s words. Otherwise, it is the Chinese media that gives a distorted report to show that Obama was troubled by the question of whether the US has any intention to be militarily involved in the dispute over the islands that Obama referred to as “rocks”. It wants to show that Obama’s dilemma: He wants to assure Japan that the US will honor its commitments while he has no intention at all to be militarily involved if China takes the “rocks” by force. Why? It is simply not worthwhile. Who is so stupid as to shed his country’s youngsters’ blood for another country’s “rocks”.

That was precisely what I wrote in my post “US Not Willing to Be Drawn into War by Japan or Philippines” on February 11, 2014.

White House’s Immediate Release, however, displays Obama’s skill to hide his dilemma.

Source: CRI Online “Reporter: What if China sends troops to the Diaoyu Islands? Obama produced a forced smile” (summary by Chan Kai Yee based on the report in Chinese”

Related posts:

  • Japan, US differ on China in talks on ‘grey zone’ military threats dated March 10, 2014
  • China says no room for compromise with Japan on history, territory dated March 8, 2014
  • China Has Made Full Preparations for War with Japan dated March 3, 2014
  • China Gives Order to Commence War with Japan ‘if It Is Appropriate to Fight’ dated February 23, 2014
  • US Not Willing to Be Drawn into War by Japan or Philippines dated February 11, 2014
  • The US Will Be the Biggest Winner if Japan Is Defeated by China in the War dated February 5, 2014
  • The Mystery of What Biden Has Got in His Beijing Visit dated December 6, 2013

China’s Xi says Japan’s wartime atrocities ‘fresh in our memory’


China's President Xi Jinping waves to media following a joint news conference with German Chancellor Angela Merkel after an agreement signing, at the Chancellery in Berlin March 28, 2014.  Credit: Reuters/Fabrizio Bensch

China’s President Xi Jinping waves to media following a joint news conference with German Chancellor Angela Merkel after an agreement signing, at the Chancellery in Berlin March 28, 2014.
Credit: Reuters/Fabrizio Bensch

Chinese President Xi Jinping said on Friday during a visit to Berlin that Japan’s wartime atrocities were still “fresh in our memory”.

Japan occupied parts of China in the 1930s and 1940s. In December, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe angered China and South Korea by visiting Tokyo’s Yasukuni Shrine, which they see as a symbol of Japan’s wartime aggression as it honors convicted war criminals as well as others who died in battle.

“We Chinese have long held the belief that we should not do onto others as we do not wish they do onto us … China needs peace like humans need air and plants need water,” he said.

Source: Reuters “China’s Xi says Japan’s wartime atrocities ‘fresh in our memory’”

Related post:

  • Will China Make Diaoyus (Senkakus) Japan’s Crimea? Dated March 29, 2014
  • China’s behaviour over Diaoyus similar to Russian annexation of Crimea, says senior Japanese official dated March 25, 2014
  • China: Signals of Imminent War with Japan dated November 11, 2013
  • War of Words over ADIZ Goes on and May Lead to Hot War despite Biden Visit dated December 6, 2013
  • China Does Not Budge in its Brink of War Policy on Air Defense Identification Zone dated December 5, 2013
  • China advises nationals living in Japan to register with embassy in Tokyo dated November 26, 2013