China’s Xi declares an ‘overwhelming victory’ over graft: state media


December 15, 2018

BEIJING (Reuters) – Chinese President Xi Jinping has declared an “overwhelming victory” in his fight against graft within the ruling Chinese Communist Party, while still vowing that the campaign to weed out deep-seated corruption will continue, state media reported.

Xi has pledged to wage war on graft until corruption of all kinds has been expunged at all levels of the Communist Party, from high-level “tigers” to low-level “flies”.

He proclaimed during a twice-a-decade meeting of the top party leadership in October 2017 that his fight against graft had achieved “overwhelming momentum”.

However, Xi announced at a meeting of the party’s Politburo on Friday that the fight had now obtained an “overwhelming victory”, state broadcaster CCTV reported.

The shift from “momentum” to “victory” reflects an important judgment from the party leadership, CCTV said.

China’s powerful graft watchdogs handled 464,000 cases and punished 406,000 people in the first nine months of 2018.

“We must forcefully reduce the number of cases and effectively stop them from growing,” the Politburo said, according to CCTV.

Xi said efforts to overhaul China’s extensive anti-graft architecture must continue to modernize the systems of oversight for party members and state employees.

China’s new National Supervisory Commission was formally established in March, extending the graft fight to all state employees and giving legal backing to the party’s controversial internal investigation and detention techniques.

Some Chinese academics have voiced concerns that the reforms will roll back years of work by legal reformers to protect the rights of suspects during investigations.

Reporting by Christian Shepherd; Editing by Paul Tait

Source: Reuters “China’s Xi declares an ‘overwhelming victory’ over graft: state media”

Note: This is Reuters’ report I post here for readers’ information. It does not mean that I agree or disagree with the report’ views.

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China hails ‘mutual respect’ as it loops Portugal into belt initiative


Sergio Goncalves, Catarina Demony December 5, 2018

LISBON (Reuters) – China will always stick to “mutual respect” in its efforts to deal with global challenges, President Xi Jinping said on Wednesday in Lisbon, where he signed agreements to link Portugal to Beijing’s belt and road initiative.

Portugal was Xi’s last stop on a trip that included a meeting of G20 leaders in Buenos Aires, where China and the United States agreed to negotiate a solution to their trade war.

“Even though the world is facing many challenges, China will always adhere to mutual respect and peaceful development, promote peace and stability,” Xi said in a short speech.

He said that during his trip he had felt people’s aspirations for “peace, stability, prosperity and a better life”.

His comments came on the back of growing caution in parts of Europe about Chinese investment in strategic sectors such as energy and ports, with governments wary that the security of infrastructure could be compromised or that innovations that have had years of research could be lost.

By contrast, Portugal, which had to be bailed out by the international community during the global financial crisis, has been open to such acquisitions in recent years.

Chinese companies have invested about 10 billion euros in Portugal in recent years, making it one of the biggest recipients of Chinese investment in Europe.

During Xi’s visit, Portugal and China signed a memorandum of understanding on cooperation on Beijing’s belt and road initiative – which promotes expanding land and sea links between Asia, Africa and Europe, with billions of dollars pledged for infrastructure development.

The memorandum on the belt and road initiative covers a wide range of sectors, especially digital connectivity and electric mobility, a statement from the Portuguese prime minister’s office said.

Beijing sees Portugal as an important partner in its project because its location makes it the closest point in Europe for ships sailing through the Panama Canal from Asia.

A separate memorandum was also signed between Portugal’s export promotions agency AICEP and COFCO, a state-owned Chinese food processing holding company which also has interests in transportation and trade. Under the agreement, COFCO will establish a global shared service center in the northern Portuguese port of Matosinhos.

Other agreements confirmed previously announced deals, such as development of micro satellites to collect data in agriculture, fishery and oceanography, and the development of 5G networks in Portugal by China’s Huawei and telecoms firm Altice..

State-owned China Three Gorges has already launched a bid for utility EDP, Portugal’s biggest company by assets, where it already holds a 23 percent stake. Xi made no mention of the bid, which is expected to run into 2019.

Reporting by Sergio Goncalves and Catarina Demony; Writing Axel Bugge, Editing by Andrei Khalip and Alison Williams

Source: Reuters “China hails ‘mutual respect’ as it loops Portugal into belt initiative”

Note: This is Reuters’ report I post here for readers’ information. It does not mean that I agree or disagree with the report’ views.


Don’t Count on the Truce Holding in Trump’s Trade War With China


Kimberly Ann Elliott |Tuesday, Dec. 4, 2018

As widely expected, U.S. President Donald Trump and his Chinese counterpart Xi Jinping declared a truce in their trade war over dinner in Buenos Aires this past weekend. According to the White House statement after the meeting, Xi committed to increase imports of American agricultural and energy products to reduce the bilateral trade deficit and to immediately begin negotiations over China’s unfair trade policies. In exchange, Trump agreed that he would not increase tariffs from 10 percent to 25 percent on $200 billion in Chinese exports as scheduled on Jan. 1, but that he could do so later if there is no broader agreement within 90 days. The Chinese statement was not so specific, saying only that it would import more from the U.S. and that the two countries would “work together to reach a consensus on trade issues,” with no mention of a deadline. Vagueness plus a tight U.S. deadline virtually guarantee that this is only a temporary truce.

This should all sound very familiar. Indeed, I’m tempted to say that it is déjà vu all over again, again. On three prior occasions, Trump administration officials announced similar deals to increase American exports and address trade barriers in China. In the most recent instance, at the end of May, chief economic adviser Larry Kudlow announced that the administration had reached a deal that would avoid the imposition of tariffs over China’s unfair trade practices, following an investigation under Section 301 of the 1974 Trade Act. He claimed that Chinese negotiators had agreed to reduce the trade deficit by at least $200 billion, and “just as important, they have to lower their tariff rates, they have to lower their non-tariff barriers. We have to have a verifiable process whereby the technology transfers and the theft of intellectual property stops.”

Chinese officials, however, denied that there had been a specific commitment to reduce the bilateral deficit and, after criticism that the deal did not address fundamental issues in the relationship, Trump reversed course and imposed 25 percent tariffs on $50 billion in Chinese exports. After China retaliated with tariffs against an equivalent amount of U.S. exports, the administration escalated the trade war, adding 10 percent levies on another $200 billion in Chinese imports, which were scheduled to increase to 25 percent at the beginning of next year. When China again retaliated, Trump threatened to raise the 10 percent tariffs to 25 percent and possibly impose tariffs on the remaining $267 billion in Chinese exports. The latter threat is in abeyance as a result of Saturday’s deal, but for how long?

The trade war has hit American farmers hard and rattled stock markets. That, along with signs that economic growth will slow next year, put pressure on the president to avoid further escalation. But in the end, Trump got essentially the same deal that Kudlow, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross and Treasury Secretary Stephen Mnuchin had announced after prior rounds of negotiations—or maybe even less. Though the Chinese denied making specific commitments for deficit reduction, earlier announcements from American officials included targets for increased exports to China of $200 billion to $250 billion. This time, there was no claim of a specific number and, according to Foreign Minister Wang Yi, China “is willing to expand imports according to the needs of the domestic market and the people, [which would] gradually ease the problem of trade imbalance.”

The fundamental problem for America’s trading partners, including China, continues to be that it is not clear what Trump’s bottom line is.

While there is widespread relief that there will not be another escalation in the trade war early next year, the Trump-Xi deal does not appear to do much for American farmers and consumers in the short run. The U.S. tariffs imposed last summer remain in place, and it is not clear whether the Chinese promise to import more from the U.S. involves the lifting of their retaliatory tariffs. In any case, the deal is too late for farmers who have already harvested this year’s crops. The threat to escalate if there is no substantive deal in 90 days, starting Dec. 1, also means that farmers still have to make next year’s planting decisions without knowing whether they will have a market in China or not.*

Meanwhile, trade signals from the G-20 summit that preceded the Trump-Xi meeting do not provide much comfort. The Trump administration agreed to sign on to the final summit communique reiterating the group’s support for a “rules-based international order.” That is a modest victory in light of the administration’s aversion to all things multilateral. But Trump refused to accept the usually anodyne reference to the costs of protectionism that has been a staple of G-20 statements since the first leaders’ summit in late 2008. The G-20 was created at that time to promote cooperation and prevent beggar-thy-neighbor policies, including an outbreak of trade protectionism, that could undermine efforts to mitigate and eventually recover from the Great Recession.

The fundamental problem for America’s trading partners, including China, continues to be that it is not clear what Trump’s bottom line is. Moreover, the bottom line can shift with Trump’s mood and which of his advisers has last gotten his attention. Early in his term, Trump’s susceptibility to flattery seemed to put being friends with Xi above trade concerns. Then, under fire last spring for not being tough enough, Trump shifted gears and imposed tariffs on China.

The failure to launch serious negotiations after firing the first shots in the trade war suggested that the administration—or at least parts of it—did not view the tariffs as leverage, but as an end in themselves that would contribute to “decoupling” the two economies. Unless China has some confidence that any concessions it makes will be reciprocated, it will not move beyond symbolic gestures, like importing a few more soybeans.

That is why the relief greeting the deal in Argentina will likely be short-lived. Reaching agreement by next March on the deep, structural issues that make China difficult for foreign investors and exporters is an incredibly ambitious timetable. Trump, China and everyone else are likely to be back in the exact same spot in early 2019 that they were in at the end of November.*

* Editor’s Note: The original version of this article stated that the 90-day negotiating period would begin Jan. 1 and end at the beginning of April, based on a statement by White House economic adviser Larry Kudlow. That statement was subsequently retracted by the White House.

Kimberly Ann Elliott is a visiting scholar at the George Washington University Institute for International Economic Policy, and a visiting fellow with the Center for Global Development. Her WPR column appears every Tuesday.

Source: World Politics Review “Don’t Count on the Truce Holding in Trump’s Trade War With China”

Note: This is World Politics Review’s article I post here for readers’ information. It does not mean that I agree or disagree with the article’s views.


Panama, China sign accords on Xi visit after diplomatic ties start


China’s President Xi Jinping and his Panamanian counterpart Juan Carlos Varela deliver a joint message after a private meeting as part of Xi’s first state visit to Panama, at Presidential Palace in Panama City, Panama December 3, 2018. REUTERS/Carlos Jasso

Elida Moreno December 4, 2018

PANAMA CITY (Reuters) – Panama and China on Monday signed 19 cooperation agreements on trade, infrastructure, banking, tourism and other areas on Chinese President Xi Jinping’s inaugural visit to the isthmus nation after the two countries opened diplomatic ties last year.

Xi arrived on Sunday night in Panama City for a 24-hour visit at a time when China is extending its influence in Central America, to the mounting chagrin of the United States, which has long viewed the region as its backyard.

After a private meeting, Xi and Panamanian President Juan Carlos Varela sealed the 19 accords, including one under which China will provide non-reimbursable aid to Panama to carry out various projects, though the amount was not disclosed.

The accords included an extradition treaty and memoranda of understanding on commercial, tourist, educational matters.

Varela thanked the Chinese leader for his visit, and recalled that when opening an import fair in China in November, Xi had told him China’s economy was an ocean.

“I want to complement those words by saying Panama connects two oceans, and his visit consolidates our country as China’s commercial arm and gateway to Latin America,” Varela said in a televised address.

In June last year, Panama broke diplomatic relations with Taiwan and established ties with China instead. This year, the Dominican Republic and El Salvador did the same, and other countries in the region may soon follow suit.

The diplomatic breaks sparked concern in Washington, which in August said that Beijing is offering economic incentives in order to dominate the countries.

However, relations between the United States and Central America have been tested by the U.S. presidency of Donald Trump.

Trump has threatened to cut aid to the region if Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador do not curtail the illegal immigration of their citizens to the United States.

Taiwan has formal ties with 17 countries, many of them small nations in Central America, the Caribbean and the Pacific.

Beijing regards Taiwan as a rebel province.

Panama, which is negotiating a free trade agreement with China, has played down the complaints of the United States, and says that its relationship with Washington is solid.

Additional reporting by Diego Ore; Writing by Dave Graham; Editing by Sandra Maler

Source: Reuters “Panama, China sign accords on Xi visit after diplomatic ties start”

Note: This is Reuters’ report I post here for readers’ information. It does not mean that I agree or disagree with the report’ views.


U.S., China agree trade war ceasefire after Trump, Xi summit


Roberta Rampton, Michael Martina December 1, 2018

U.S. President Donald Trump, U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, U.S. President Donald Trump’s national security adviser John Bolton and Chinese President Xi Jinping attend a working dinner after the G20 leaders summit in Buenos Aires, Argentina December 1, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

BUENOS AIRES (Reuters) – China and the United States agreed to a ceasefire in their bitter trade war on Saturday after high-stakes talks in Argentina between U.S. President Donald Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping, including no escalated tariffs on Jan. 1.

Trump will leave tariffs on $200 billion worth of Chinese imports at 10 percent at the beginning of the new year, agreeing to not raise them to 25 percent “at this time”, the White House said in a statement.

“China will agree to purchase a not yet agreed upon, but very substantial, amount of agricultural, energy, industrial, and other product from the United States to reduce the trade imbalance between our two countries,” it said.

“China has agreed to start purchasing agricultural product from our farmers immediately.”

The two leaders also agreed to immediately start talks on structural changes with respect to forced technology transfers, intellectual property protection, non-tariff barriers, cyber intrusions and cyber theft, services and agriculture, the White House said.

Both countries agreed they will try to have this “transaction” completed within the next 90 days, but if this does not happen then the 10 percent tariffs will be raised to 25 percent, it added.

The Chinese government’s top diplomat, State Councillor Wang Yi, said the negotiations were conducted in a “friendly and candid atmosphere”.

“The two presidents agreed that the two sides can and must get bilateral relations right,” Wang told reporters, adding they agreed to further exchanges at appropriate times.

“Discussion on economic and trade issues was very positive and constructive. The two heads of state reached consensus to halt the mutual increase of new tariffs,” Wang said.

“China is willing to increase imports in accordance with the needs of its domestic market and the people’s needs, including marketable products from the United States, to gradually ease the imbalance in two-way trade.”

“The two sides agreed to mutually open their markets, and as China advances a new round of reforms, the United States’ legitimate concerns can be progressively resolved.”

The two sides would “step up negotiations” toward full elimination of all additional tariffs, Wang said.

The announcements came after Trump and Xi sat down with their aides for a working dinner at the end of a two-day gathering of world leaders in Buenos Aires, their dispute having unnerved global financial markets and weighed on the world economy.

After the 2-1/2 hour meeting, White House chief economist Larry Kudlow told reporters the talks went “very well,” but offered no specifics as he boarded Air Force One headed home to Washington with Trump.

China’s goal was to persuade Trump to abandon plans to raise tariffs on $200 billion of Chinese goods to 25 percent in January, from 10 percent at present. Trump had threatened to do that, and possibly add tariffs on $267 billion of imports, if there was no progress in the talks.

With the United States and China clashing over commerce, financial markets will take their lead from the results of the talks, widely seen as the most important meeting of U.S. and Chinese leaders in years.

The encounter came shortly after the Group of 20 industrialized nations backed an overhaul of the World Trade Organization (WTO), which regulates international trade disputes, marking a victory for Trump, a sharp critic of the organization.

Trump told Xi at the start of their meeting he hoped they would achieve “something great” on trade for both countries. He struck a positive note as he sat across from Xi, despite the U.S. president’s earlier threats to impose new tariffs on Chinese imports as early as the next year.

He suggested that the “incredible relationship” he and Xi had established would be “the very primary reason” they could make progress on trade.

Xi told Trump that only through cooperation could the United States and China serve the interest of peace and prosperity. Washington and Beijing have also increasingly been at odds over security in the Asia-Pacific region.

At the same time, Trump again raised with Xi his concern about the synthetic opioid fentanyl being sent from China to the United States, urging the Chinese leader to place it in a “restricted category” of drugs that would criminalize it.

The White House said Xi, “in a wonderful humanitarian gesture”, had agreed to designate fentanyl a controlled substance.

Xi also said that he was open to approving the previously unapproved Qualcomm-NXP deal should it again be presented to him, the White House added.

“This was an amazing and productive meeting with unlimited possibilities for both the United States and China. It is my great honor to be working with President Xi,” Trump said in the statement.

WTO REFORMS

Earlier on Saturday, the leaders of the world’s top economies called for WTO reform in their final summit statement.

Officials expressed relief that agreement on the communique was reached after negotiators worked through the night to overcome differences over language on climate change.

The final text recognized trade as an important engine of global growth but made only a passing reference to “the current trade issues” after the U.S. delegation won a battle to keep any mention of protectionism out of the statement.

Trump has long railed against China’s trade surplus with the United States, and Washington accuses Beijing of not playing fairly on trade. China calls the United States protectionist and has resisted what it views as attempts to intimidate it.

The two countries are also at odds over China’s extensive claims in the South China Sea and U.S. warship movements through the highly sensitive Taiwan Strait.

In addition to tariffs on Chinese goods, Trump has imposed tariffs on steel and aluminum imports into the United States this year. Numerous countries have filed litigation at the WTO to contest the levies.

The United States is unhappy with what it says is the WTO’s failure to hold China to account for not opening up its economy as envisioned when China joined the body in 2001. The European Union is also pushing for sweeping changes to how the WTO operates.
G20 delegates said negotiations on the summit statement proceeded more smoothly than at a meeting of Asia-Pacific leaders two weeks ago, where disagreement on protectionism and unfair trading practices prevented a consensus.

European officials said a reference to refugees and migration – a sensitive issue for Trump’s administration – was excised to ensure consensus.

On climate change, the United States once again marked its differences with the rest of the G20 by reiterating in the statement its decision to withdraw from the Paris Agreement and its commitment to using all kinds of energy sources.

The other members of the group reaffirmed their commitment to implement the Paris deal and tackle climate change.

International Monetary Fund (IMF) Managing Director Christine Lagarde said high levels of debt accumulated by emerging market nations was a pressing concern.

U.S. officials said a call by G20 leaders for the IMF and World Bank to improve monitoring debt levels was aimed at ensuring that developing economies did not become to heavily indebted to China in return for infrastructure projects.

U.S. officials have warned about China’s increasing influence across swaths of the developing world, including Latin America. G20 summit host Argentina is expected to sign a series of deals with China on Sunday during a one-day state visit by Xi.

Apart from trade and climate change, Russia’s seizure of Ukrainian vessels drew condemnation from other G20 members, while the presence of Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman at the summit raised an awkward dilemma for leaders.

Saudi Arabia’s de facto ruler arrived amid controversy over the killing of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi, though Saudi officials have said the prince had no prior knowledge of the murder.

The leader of the OPEC heavyweight had a series of bilateral meetings at the summit, including a closely watched encounter with Russian President Vladimir Putin.

Reporting by Roberta Rampton, Michael Martina, Matt Spetalnick, Maximilian Heath, Scott Squires, Cassandra Garrison, Daniel Flynn and Kylie Maclellan in Buenos Aires; Dave Shepardson and Humeyra Pamuk in Washington, Ben Blanchard in Beijing and John Ruwitch in Shanghai; writing by Matt Spetalnick and Daniel Flynn; editing by Ross Colvin, Alistair Bell, Jonathan Oatis and Will Dunham

Source: Reuters “U.S., China agree trade war ceasefire after Trump, Xi summit”

Note: This is Reuters’ report I post here for readers’ information. It does not mean that I agree or disagree with the report’ views.


Trump, meeting China’s Xi, voices hope for progress on trade dispute


U.S. President Donald Trump, U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, U.S. President Donald Trump’s national security adviser John Bolton and Chinese President Xi Jinping attend a working dinner after the G20 leaders summit in Buenos Aires, Argentina December 1, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

Roberta Rampton, Cassandra Garrison December 1, 2018

BUENOS AIRES (Reuters) – U.S. President Donald Trump told Chinese President Xi Jinping on Saturday he hoped they would achieve “something great” on trade for both countries as they opened a high-stakes summit aimed at defusing a damaging tariffs war between Washington and Beijing.

With the United States and China locked in an economic dispute that has unnerved global financial markets and weighed on the world economy, Trump and Xi sat down with their aides for a working dinner at the end of a two-day gathering of world leaders in Buenos Aires.

Their closely watched meeting came shortly after the Group of 20 industrialized nations backed an overhaul of the global body that regulates international trade disputes, marking a victory for Trump, a sharp critic of the organization.

Trump struck a positive note as he sat across from Xi, despite the U.S. president’s earlier threats to impose new tariffs on Chinese imports.

“We’ll be discussing trade and I think at some point we are going to end up doing something great for China and great for the United States,” Trump said when a small pool of reporters was briefly allowed into the room.

He suggested that the “incredible relationship” he and Xi had established would be “the very primary reason” they could make progress on trade, though he offered no specifics on how they might resolve the main issue dividing their countries.

Xi told Trump that only through cooperation could the United States and China serve the interest of peace and prosperity. The world’s two biggest economies have also increasingly been at odds over security in the Asia-Pacific region.

At the same time, Trump again raised with Xi his concern about the synthetic opioid fentanyl being sent from China to the United States, urging the Chinese leader to place it in a “restricted category” of drugs that would criminalize it.

Earlier on Saturday, the leaders of all the world’s top economies called for reforms to the crisis-stricken World Trade Organization in a final statement from their summit.

Officials expressed relief that agreement on the summit communique was reached after negotiators worked through the night to overcome differences over language on climate change.

The final text recognized trade as an important engine of global growth but made only a passing reference to “the current trade issues,” after the U.S. delegation won a battle to keep any mention of protectionism out of the statement.

In addition to tariffs on Chinese goods, Trump has imposed tariffs on steel and aluminums imports into the United States this year. Numerous countries have filed litigation at the WTO to contest the levies.

The United States is unhappy with what it says is the WTO’s failure to hold Beijing to account for not opening up its economy as envisioned when China joined the body in 2001. The European Union is also pushing for sweeping changes to how the WTO operates.

“Notwithstanding our differences, we have been able to agree a path forward at the G20,” French President Emanuel Macron told a news conference. “The United States has endorsed a clear multilateralist text.”

G20 delegates said negotiations on the final summit statement proceeded more smoothly than at a meeting of Asian leaders two weeks ago, where disagreements on protectionism and unfair trading practices prevented a consensus.

European officials said a reference to refugees and migration – a sensitive issue for Trump’s administration – was excised to ensure consensus.

On climate change, the United States once again marked its differences with the rest of the G20 by reiterating in the statement its decision to withdraw from the Paris Agreement and its commitment to using all kinds of energy sources.

The other members of the group reaffirmed their commitment to implement the Paris deal and tackle climate change, taking into account their national circumstances and relative capabilities.

U.S.-CHINA SUMMIT

With the United States and China clashing over commerce and security, global financial markets next week will take their lead from the results of Saturday’s talks between Trump and Xi.

Ahead of what was seen as the most important meeting of U.S. and Chinese leaders in years, both sides said differences remained, and the outcome of the talks were uncertain.

Beijing hopes to persuade Trump to abandon plans to hike tariffs on $200 billion of Chinese goods to 25 percent in January, from 10 percent at present. Trump has threatened to go ahead with that and possibly add tariffs on $267 billion of imports if there is no progress in the talks.

A Chinese foreign ministry official in Buenos Aires said there were signs of increasing consensus ahead of the discussions but that differences persisted.

Trump has long railed against China’s trade surplus with the United States, and Washington accuses Beijing of not playing fairly on trade. China calls the United States protectionist and has resisted what it views as attempts to intimidate it.

The two countries are also at odds militarily over China’s extensive claims in the South China Sea and U.S. warship movements through the highly sensitive Taiwan Strait.

International Monetary Fund Managing Director Christine Lagarde said high levels of debt accumulated by emerging market nations was a pressing concern.

“There is an urgent need to de-escalate trade tensions, reverse recent tariff increases, and modernize the rules-based multilateral trade system,” she said.

U.S. officials said a call by G20 leaders for the IMF and World Bank to improve monitoring debt levels was aimed at ensuring that developing economies did not become to heavily indebted to China in return for infrastructure projects.

U.S. officials, including Vice President Mike Pence, have warned about China’s increasing influence across swaths of the developing world, including Latin America. G20 summit host Argentina is expected to sign a series of deals with China on Sunday during a one-day state visit by Xi.

Apart from trade and climate change, Russia’s seizure of Ukrainian vessels drew condemnation from other G20 members, while the presence of Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman at the summit raised an awkward dilemma for leaders.

Saudi Arabia’s de facto ruler arrived amid controversy over the killing of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi, though Saudi officials have said the prince had no prior knowledge of the murder.

While Prince Mohammed was largely sidelined by other leaders at public events, the leader of the OPEC heavyweight had a series of bilateral meetings, including a closely watched encounter with Putin.

Reporting by Roberta Rampton, Michael Martina, Matt Spetalnick, Maximilian Heath, Scott Squires, Cassandra Garrison, Daniel Flynn and Kylie Maclellan in Buenos Aires; writing by Matt Spetalnick and Daniel Flynn; editing by Ross Colvin, Alistair Bell and Jonathan Oatis

Source: Reuters “Trump, meeting China’s Xi, voices hope for progress on trade dispute”

Note: This is Reuters’ report I post here for readers’ information. It does not mean that I agree or disagree with the report’ views.


China looking to boost agricultural exports to India, President Xi tells PM Modi


December 1, 2018

MUMBAI (Reuters) – China was looking to boost agricultural exports to India while increasing imports of rapeseed and soymeal from the country, President Xi Jinping told Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi on the sidelines of a G20 meeting on Friday.

China’s Xi also indicated greater trade in the pharmaceuticals sector between the two nations, India’s foreign secretary Vijay Gokhale, who was traveling with Modi, said, detailing the deliberations between the two leaders.

“On the economic side, President Xi Jinping referred to enhanced imports of rice and sugar from India and spoke of possibility of greater imports of soymeal and rapeseed,” he said.

The meeting at the G20 summit was the fourth between Xi and Modi this year as the leaders looked to build on a thaw in ties between the two countries after a military standoff on their disputed border last year, officials told Reuters on Thursday.

India’s commerce ministry and a six-member Chinese delegation signed an agreement on Wednesday allowing Beijing to inspect imports of Indian fish meal and fish oil in an effort to ease market access for exports of various farm products.

Reporting by Nidhi Verma and Abhirup Roy, editing by Louise Heavens

Source: Reuters “China looking to boost agricultural exports to India, President Xi tells PM Modi”

Note: This is Reuters’ report I post here for readers’ information. It does not mean that I agree or disagree with the report’ views.