Hong Kong braces for protests as China rules out full democracy


A pro-democracy protester carries a placard which reads 'Communist Party, you lie!' as he sits with other protesters during a campaign to kick off the Occupy Central civil disobedience event in front of the financial Central district in Hong Kong August 31, 2014.  Credit: Reuters/Bobby Yip

A pro-democracy protester carries a placard which reads ‘Communist Party, you lie!’ as he sits with other protesters during a campaign to kick off the Occupy Central civil disobedience event in front of the financial Central district in Hong Kong August 31, 2014.
Credit: Reuters/Bobby Yip

Pro-democracy activists vowed on Sunday to bring Hong Kong’s financial hub to a standstill after China’s parliament rejected their demands for the right to freely choose the former British colony’s next leader in 2017.

The Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress (NPC) endorsed a framework to let only two or three candidates run in the 2017 leadership vote. All candidates must first obtain majority backing from a nominating committee likely to be stacked with Beijing loyalists.

The relatively tough decision by the NPC – China’s final arbiter on the city’s democratic affairs – makes it almost impossible for opposition democrats to get on the ballot.

“This is a legal, fair and reasonable decision. It is a dignified, prudent decision, and its legal effect is beyond doubt,” Li Fei, deputy secretary general of the NPC standing committee, told reporters after the decision.

Hundreds of “Occupy Central” activists, who demand Beijing allow a real, free election, prepared to stage a small protest late on Sunday to formally launch a campaign of civil disobedience that will climax with a blockade at some time of the city’s important Central business district.

“Today is not only the darkest day in the history of Hong Kong’s democratic development, today is also the darkest day of one country, two systems,” said Benny Tai, a law professor and one of Occupy Central’s main leaders, referring to the formula under which capitalist Hong Kong, with a population of around 7.2 million, was returned to Communist Chinese rule in 1997.

The Occupy movement said in a statement that “all chances of dialogue have been exhausted and the occupation of Central will definitely happen.” It gave no timeframe for its action.

A spokesman for Hong Kong Exchanges and Clearing (0388.HK), which operates the Hong Kong Stock Exchange, said contingency planning was taken very seriously. “We have long had a specialist team that coordinates group response plans for scenarios that put at risk the continuing operation of the exchange or threaten the well-being or safety of our staff.”

Hong Kong’s current chief executive Leung Chun-ying said Beijing’s decision represented a major step forward in Hong Kong’s development.

“Universal suffrage for the (chief executive) election through “one person, one vote” by Hong Kong people is not only a big step forward for Hong Kong, but also a historic milestone for our country,” he said, adding people should express their opinion through peaceful and legal methods.

Political reform has been a constant source of friction between Hong Kong’s pro-democracy movement and the mainland since Britain returned the city to China 17 years ago.

In nearby Macau, another special administrative region, leader and sole candidate Fernando Chui was “re-elected” on Sunday by a select panel of 400 largely pro-China loyalists in the tiny but wealthy former Portuguese colony.

GIRDING FOR ACTION

Scores of police vehicles and hundreds of officers were deployed outside Hong Kong government headquarters as people began to gather late on Sunday, braving heavy rain at times, with some chanting slogans.

Key government buildings, including the Chief Executive’s office and a People’s Liberation Army barracks nearby, were also ringed by high fences and barricades.

“It (the NPC decision) leaves no room for us to fight for a genuinely democratic system, and we will begin our campaign for peaceful, non-violent struggle,” said Joseph Cheng, the convener of the Alliance for True Democracy, a coalition of groups advocating universal suffrage in Hong Kong. “We want to tell the world we haven’t given up. We will continue to fight.”

The United States responded cautiously. Commenting on the planned protest, a U.S. official who declined to be identified by name said Washington supports Hong Kong’s “traditions and Basic Law protections of internationally recognized freedoms, including the freedom of peaceful assembly and freedom of expression.”

The official also said “the legitimacy of the chief executive will be greatly enhanced if “the election provides the people of Hong Kong a genuine choice of candidates representative of the voters’ will.”

“We understand that the August 31 announcement is just one step in an ongoing process leading to a final decision on election reform in Hong Kong and will continue to watch as the process unfolds,” the official said in Washington.

On the surface, the NPC’s decision is a breakthrough that endorses the framework for the first direct vote by a Chinese city to choose its leader. Beijing is already hailing it as a milestone in democratic reform.

However, by tightly curbing nominations for the 2017 leadership poll, some democrats said Beijing was pushing a Chinese-style version of “fake” democracy.

The NPC statement said all nominations would be carried out according to “democratic procedures” and each candidate would need the endorsement of more than half of a nominating committee that will be similar in composition to an existing 1,200-person election committee stacked with Beijing loyalists.

The proposed electoral framework will still needs to be approved by two-thirds of Hong Kong’s 70-seat legislature. With pro-democracy lawmakers holding more than a third of the seats, the proposal will likely be shelved.

In that case, the next leader would likely again be chosen by a small election committee. Wang Zhenmin, a prominent legal scholar and adviser to the Chinese government, said recently that: “Less perfect universal suffrage is better than no universal suffrage,” adding that this window of opportunity in Hong Kong was an historical crossroads after “2,000 years of (Chinese) feudal history without any democracy.”

Senior Chinese officials have repeatedly warned activists against their “illegal” protests, and say they won’t back down.

Some key members of the pro-democracy movement, including media magnate Jimmy Lai, have also come under pressure in the run-up to the Chinese parliamentary decision.

China has also repeatedly warned against foreign interference, saying it will not tolerate the use of Hong Kong “as a bridgehead to subvert and infiltrate the mainland.”

The Occupy Central movement has not yet won broad support among Hong Kong’s middle class, who are concerned about antagonizing China and disruptions to business. Any strong measures by China or the Hong Kong police could change that.

Source: Reuters “Hong Kong braces for protests as China rules out full democracy”

Related posts:

  • China and Hong Kong poised for showdown over democracy dated August 31, 20144
  • Beijing Tightening Its Grip of Hong Kong by Various Means dated July 2, 2014
  • On day of Hong Kong mass protests, China’s army opens barracks to public dated July 1, 2014
  • Mass Hong Kong protest looms as democracy push gathers steam dated June 30, 2014
  • China warns of limits to Hong Kong freedom as protests loom dated June 10, 2014
  • Hong Kong recalls Tiananmen killings, China muffles dissent dated June 4, 2014

China Eyes Russia’s S-400, Taiwan Seeks New Air Defense System


China’s purchase of Russia S-400 has been much described in my posts, but Taiwan’s development of its home made missile defense is quite new and interesting. I hope readers will like it.

Peace and Freedom

By Zachary Keck
The Diplomat

China and Taiwan are both primed to invest heavily in air and missile defense systems in the coming years.

On the one hand, there have been more and more signs that China will become the first foreign customer of Russia’s most advanced anti-missile system, the S-400. China’s People’s Liberation Army already operates the Russian-made S-300 anti-missile system, and Beijing and Moscow have reportedly been negotiating over the S-400 since 2010. These talks have reportedly been slowed by a number of issues, including Russia’s concern that China would reverse-engineer the advanced anti-air and anti-missile system.

As The Diplomat noted back in April, the two sides have reportedly made progress on overcoming these issues this year, and Russian media outlets have reported that Russian President Vladimir Putin has approved in principle the sale of between two and four S-400 air and missile defense systems to China.

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Xi Jinping Exploits Development of Military Technology to Control PLA


Xi Jinping met chiefs of general staff of Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO) member states who attend a conference of them in Beijing on August 28. Photo: Xinhua/Yao Dawei

Xi Jinping met chiefs of general staff of Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO) member states who attend a conference of them in Beijing on August 28. Photo: Xinhua/Yao Dawei

In my book Tiananmen’s Tremendous Achievements I describe Jiang Zemin exploiting the panic caused by US shocking victory in the Gulf War to modernize the People’s Liberation Army (PLA) and establish his control of PLA by replacing old generation of generals ignorant of modern military technology with well-educated generals who have mastery of new military technology.

Jiang established his position as the core of CCP (Chinese Communist Party) leadership first through his control of Chinese military. His success in transforming China’s state-owned enterprises made him the paramount leader.

Now, it is Xi Jinping’s turn to establish his control of Chinese military through the modernization in light of new development of technology.

According to Xinhua’s report, Xi presided over the 17th collective study of CCP Politburo to jointly study the new trend in world military development in order to promote innovations in Chinese military.

Prof. Xiao Tianliang of the Strategy Teaching and Research Faculty of the National Defense University gave a lecture on the issue and provided his opinions and suggestions.

Xi gave a speech when he presided over the study. He pointed out that in studying military issues, one has first to be clear of the general trend of development in the world and accurately grasp the new trend in military development. At present, the international situation is at a new turning point where division and integration of various strategic forces are quickened. The international system has entered a new period of accelerated transformation and adjustment. The development and changes in military sphere is extensive and profound amid the unprecedented great changes in the situation. They are an important part of the great development, transformation and adjustment in the world.

In military sphere, such development, transformation and adjustment center on information technology (IT) and mainly consist of innovation in military strategy, technology, principles, doctrines, capabilities, institutions and management modes with the goal to reorganize China’s military systems. The new military revolution resulting from them is so deep, quick, large-scale, extensive and great in repercussion that has been rare since the end of World War II.

Xi stressed that the new military revolution in the world is an all-round one that penetrates all levels and cover all spheres of war and military buildup. It concerns not only the swift and vigorous advance in military science and technology, but also incessant innovations in military theory and profound transformation of military systems.

He said that there was greater need than ever before to carry on the fine tradition of military innovation to strive to establish a full set of new military theory, institution, organization, weapon systems, strategy, tactics and management mode that suits information warfare and performance of missions.

Xi stressed that among the innumerable arduous tasks of military innovation, priority shall be given to:

1. Persisting in achieving the goal of making China militarily powerful;

2. Persisting in liberating thoughts and changing concepts so as to have the courage to change the fixed mindsets of mechanized warfare and establish the ideological concept of information warfare, change the fixed mindsets of maintaining traditional safety and establish the ideological concept of safeguarding the nation’s comprehensive safety and development of strategic interests, and change the fixed mindsets of fighting with a single arm of the services and establish the ideological concept of integrating and combining various arms of services in combat.

3. Persisting in grasping the key issue to promote the progress of the whole;

4. Persisting in stressing Chinese military’s special characteristics and conducting independent innovations.

He wanted in addition joint military and civilian efforts in innovation so that China’s military industry will be greatly supported by civilian industries.

When Xi has completed his transformation of Chinese military in the above mentioned manner, Chinese military will be dominated by the professional officers promoted by him. Xi will thus take full control of Chinese military.

Reuters says in its report on the speech, “The announcement by Xi could rattle many of China’s rivals, including the United States. Officials in Washington have argued for years that cyber espionage is a top national security concern, and Beijing and Washington have confronted each other publicly about the issue. In May, U.S. authorities charged five Chinese military officers with hacking into American companies to steal trade secrets.”

If the US responds to Xi’s revolutionary transformation of Chinese military in that way, the US is doomed to be defeated by China.

Accusation of hacking and cyber espionage is but a propaganda trick to reduce the impact of Snowden scandal. The US admits that it is carrying out cyber espionage against the governments and military of other nations. It accuses China of espionage for stealing trade secrets from US companies not for stealing secrets from US government and military. It is common knowledge that both the US and China are conducting espionage to steal the other’s military secrets. Accusation of that is meaningless.

However, the IT innovation that Xi regards as the core has nothing to do with hacking and cyber espionage. As far as this bloggers knows, China is making great efforts in developing quantum communications networks that are entirely secure from hacking and cyber espionage. Perhaps, there is something more advanced that this blogger is not aware of.

At least, in Chinese media reports about Chinese military drills, there are descriptions of successful fulfillment of tasks in spite of difficult information warfare situation such as interference and jamming. It gives the impression that Quantum communications (or some other kind of communications) are used by Chinese troops.

We shall see that what Xi means is China following the trend of great development, transformation and adjustment in the world while hacking and cyber espionage are nothing new.

The following is the full text of Reuters report:

China’s Xi urges army to create strategy for information warfare

Chinese President Xi Jinping has said China will spur military innovation and called on the army to create a new strategy for “information warfare” as the country embarks on military reform, state media said on Saturday.

Xi heads the Central Military Commission, which controls the 2.3-million-strong armed forces, the world’s largest, and is stepping up efforts to modernize forces that are projecting power across disputed waters in the East and South China Seas.

During a meeting with the ruling Chinese Communist Party’s Politburo, Xi said China “must vigorously promote military innovation” but warned it will be difficult.

“When you compare military innovation to other forms of innovation, the demands are greater and there will be a higher degree of difficulty,” Xi was quoted as saying.

“Faced with the severe challenges to our national security and stability and the deep-seated contradictions and problems with reform, it is even more pressing that we greatly liberate our ideas and concepts, have the courage to change our fixed mindsets of mechanized warfare and establish the ideological concept of information warfare”.

Xi said the army must “strive to establish a new military doctrine, institutions, equipment systems, strategies and tactics and management modes” for information warfare.

The announcement by Xi could rattle many of China’s rivals, including the United States. Officials in Washington have argued for years that cyber espionage is a top national security concern, and Beijing and Washington have confronted each other publicly about the issue.

In May, U.S. authorities charged five Chinese military officers with hacking into American companies to steal trade secrets.

A hacking attempt on a sensitive Canadian government computer network last month was similar to attacks mounted by an elite unit of the Chinese army based in Shanghai, according to a cybersecurity expert.

China has denied those charges, saying it is also a victim of cyber attacks.

In March, China announced its biggest rise in military spending in three years, a strong signal that it is not about to back away from its growing assertiveness in Asia, especially in disputed waters.

The spending increase appears to reflect Xi’s desire to build what he calls a strong, rejuvenated China, even though the country has not fought a war in decades.

Xi also recently urged military leaders to speed efforts to get the country’s sole aircraft carrier combat-ready.

Aside from the carrier, China is developing a range of high-tech weaponry, from stealth fighters to systems for shooting down satellites.

Source: Xinhua news carried by huanqiu.com “Xi Jinping: Grasp the new trend in military development, vigorously promote military innovations” (summary by Chan Kai Yee based on the report in Chinese)

Source: Reuters “China’s Xi urges army to create strategy for information warfare”


China and Hong Kong poised for showdown over democracy


A Chinese national flag is seen in front of the chimney of a heat supply plant in Beijing July 16, 2014.  Credit: Reuters/Kim Kyung-Hoon

A Chinese national flag is seen in front of the chimney of a heat supply plant in Beijing July 16, 2014.
Credit: Reuters/Kim Kyung-Hoon

Hong Kong is poised for a showdown with China when the Chinese parliament meets later on Sunday, with the largely rubber-stamp body likely to snuff out hopes for a democratic breakthrough in the regional financial hub at elections due in 2017.
Political reform has been a constant source of friction between Hong Kong’s pro-democracy movement and the mainland since the former British colony was handed back to Communist Party rulers in 1997.

On the surface, the National People’s Congress will likely make a landmark ruling by endorsing the framework for the first direct vote by a Chinese city to choose its leader. Beijing is already hailing it as a milestone in democratic reform.

However, Beijing will tightly curb nominations for the 2017 leadership poll to filter out any candidates it deems unacceptable, said a person with knowledge of the electoral framework. Only two or three “patriotic” candidates will be allowed on the ballot and open nominations will be ruled out. Instead, candidates must be backed by at least 50 percent of a 1,200-person “nominating committee”.

That committee is meant to be “broadly representative” of Hong Kong interests, but will be similar in composition to an existing election committee stacked with pro-Beijing loyalists.

It’s a formula that will rile Hong Kong’s pro-democracy activists, who plan to blockade the city’s Central business district in the coming weeks.

On Saturday, Hong Kong’s public broadcaster RTHK said 5,000 police will be deployed for the “Occupy Central” protest, heightening the sense of unease. The city’s 28,000-strong police force is already on high alert.

An initial protest planned for Sunday evening will be the start of what activists and lawmakers have described as a “full-scale, wave after wave” civil disobedience campaign.

Hong Kong’s democracy advocates remain deeply distrustful of Beijing despite assurances from the mainland.

“Even if we accept a fake democracy model, there’s no assurance at all, that for the next vote, there’ll be real democracy,” said Lee Cheuk-yan, a pro-democracy lawmaker.

Wang Zhenmin, a prominent legal scholar and Chinese government adviser who was flown to Hong Kong by the Chinese Ministry of Foreign Affairs to talk about the 2017 election, said it is time for “practical and realistic steps”.

“Less perfect universal suffrage is better than no universal suffrage. Leave some room for future growth,” he said.

WON’T BACK DOWN

The proposed electoral framework will still have to be endorsed by two-thirds of Hong Kong’s 70-seat legislature. With pro-democracy lawmakers holding more than a third of the seats, the proposal will likely be shelved. “We will not accept such a model of fake democracy, and we will vote it down,” Lee said.

Senior Chinese officials have repeatedly warned activists against their “illegal” protests and say they won’t back down.

Some key members of the pro-democracy movement, including media magnate Jimmy Lai, have also come under pressure in the run-up to the Chinese parliamentary decision.

On Friday, China also repeated its warning against foreign interference, saying it will not tolerate the use of Hong Kong “as a bridgehead to subvert and infiltrate the mainland”.

The Occupy Central movement has not yet won broad support among Hong Kong’s middle class, who are concerned about antagonizing China and disruptions to business, but strong measures by China or the Hong Kong police could change that.

“If police use tear gas or water cannon … this (use of) disproportionate force on protesters will generate more support for our civil disobedience campaign,” said Benny Tai, a law professor and one of Occupy Central’s main leaders.

Tai and several other Occupy Central organizers, fearful of arrest, declined to be specific about the timing of their plans but said they also won’t back down. Other action could include a boycott of university classes, wildcat street protests, strikes and a mass refusal to pay taxes.

Major companies and banks in Central, including HSBC, have held drills and have contingency plans for a possible shutdown in coming weeks or months. Ratings agencies and banks have also noted the possibility of China tensions affecting the city’s longer term economic outlook.

Also on Sunday, Fernando Chui is widely expected to be “re-elected” as chief executive of nearby Macau, the tiny but wealthy former Portuguese-run enclave, after the pro-China government stifled an unofficial referendum on democracy.

Chui is the only candidate in the election by a select panel of 400 largely pro-China loyalists. Macau, a casino hub, was returned to China in 1999.

Source: Reuters “China and Hong Kong poised for showdown over democracy”

Related posts:

  • Beijing Tightening Its Grip of Hong Kong by Various Means dated July 2, 2014
  • On day of Hong Kong mass protests, China’s army opens barracks to public dated July 1, 2014
  • Mass Hong Kong protest looms as democracy push gathers steam dated June 30, 2014
  • China warns of limits to Hong Kong freedom as protests loom dated June 10, 2014
  • Hong Kong recalls Tiananmen killings, China muffles dissent dated June 4, 2014

China Building Artificial Island Quickly on Johnson South Reef


The artificial island at Johnson South Reef

In mid May, the Philippines protested against China for China’s reclamation of land at Johnson South Reef. An area of 0.09 square km had already been reclaimed.

I pointed out in my previous posts that China is carrying out reclamation to build not only military but also fishing, fish farming and tourism bases on the islands and reefs in the South China Sea. What counts is not who has taken the islands there but how the islands and reefs are exploited to bring benefit to the claimant.

It seems China is carrying out construction of its facilities at high speed to exploit the islands, reefs and waters there.

According to Philippine Star’s report on August 28, Philippine air reconnaissance found that a heart-shaped white artificial island has been built on Johnson South Reef to replace the reef.

There is a blue building at the center of the island and a dock being built in the area of reclamation. China seems to have switched from reclamation to planting trees and other plants there including coconut and palm trees. The trees are all grown-up ones transplanted from elsewhere. That is wise as only grown-up trees are strong enough to resist typhoons and protect the buildings and people there.

In addition, according to Philippine fishermen passing by, a dam is being built on the west side of the artificial island. Inside the island, air reconnaissance has found building materials and various kinds of heavy construction machinery.

Source: China Daily “Philippine media: China has built an artificial island on Johnson South Reef: Heavy machinery can clearly be seen from sky” (summary by Chan Kai Yee base on the report in Chinese)

Related posts:

  • China says can build what it wants on South China Sea isles dated August 4, 2014
  • China Building Military Base for Exploiting Oil, Gas, Fish Resources in South China Sea dated June 19, 2014
  • China Taking Offensives at South China Sea in Earnest and with Vigor dated June 7, 2014
  • Design of China’s Military Base to Be Built on Reef in South China Sea dated May 25, 2014

US Steps Up, China Calls for Stop of Close-in Reconnaissance of China’s Nuke Subs


A Chinese J-11 fighter jet is seen flying near a U.S. Navy P-8 Poseidon about 215 km (135 miles) east of China’s Hainan Island. DoD Photo

A Chinese J-11 fighter jet is seen flying near a U.S. Navy P-8 Poseidon about 215 km (135 miles) east of China’s Hainan Island. DoD Photo

In my post yesterday, I posted the full text of Wall Street Journal report titled “U.S.-China Rivalry Simmers Underseas” that believes the underlying cause for a Chinese J-11 fighter jet’s dangerous intercept of a US P-8 anti-submarine aircraft is US urgent desire to know about the secrets of China’s strategic nuclear submarines and China’s desperate efforts to keep the secrets.

Since the US learnt from China’s disclosure of the deployment of China’s third-generation Type 096 and successful development of its fourth-generation Type 098 strategic nuclear submarines, it has sent six of its most advanced P-8 anti-submarine aircrafts to Asia for the purpose of detecting and tracking 096 submarines. However, once such a submarine has entered a vast ocean, detection is very difficult if not impossible. At least, the US has so far failed to detect any.

The US has to send its P-8 close to China’s nuclear submarine base to detect the submarine and find its weak point to detection. Then it can find a way to detect the submarine.

China certainly would not allow the US to know its top secret; therefore, naturally, it would send its best pilot to intercept P-8. The pilot’s dangerous moves proved his amazing skill.

Therefore, such dangerous intercept was indeed conducted to protect China’s secrets instead of downing a B-8 to tap its secrets.

That was why at a press conference on August 28, Chinese Ministry of Defense spokesman Yang Yujun called on the US to stop close-in surveillance flights.

This blogger believe that the US certainly will not stop as such surveillance flights have been its routine practice all around the world. Since the US does not enter China’s territorial airspace, China cannot shoot down US surveillance aircrafts. Its only alternative is the kind of dangerous intercept it carried out on August 19.

That being the case, there may well be a repletion of 2001 Hainan Island incident in which a Chinese fighter jet clashed with a US reconnaissance aircraft.

The following is the full text of USNI’s report on Chinese spokesman’s response to question about the dangerous intercept:

Chinese MOD Calls for a Stop of U.S. ‘Close-In’ Surveillance Flights

China called on the U.S. military to stop its “wide in range, highly frequent and close in distance,” surveillance missions on the edge of the Chinese mainland, People’s Liberation Army officials said in a Thursday Beijing press conferences.

“These behaviors of U.S. military ships and aircraft could easily cause misperception and miscalculation or even air and sea accidents,” Yang Yujun, spokesman for the Chinese Ministry of Defense (MOD), said in response to questions.

Therefore, we do urge the U.S. side to decrease these close-in reconnaissance activities against China towards a complete stop.”

Yang said the U.S. ships and aircraft “often [show] up without being invited or even broke in our exercise or training zones which have been announced in advance.”

The most recent comments follow an incident in which a Chinese Shenyang J-11BH fighter buzzed a P-8A Poseidon off the coast of Hainan Island in the South China Sea on Aug. 19.

The fighter, “made several passes, three different occasions, crossed under the aircraft with one pass having only 50-100 feet separation,” Rear Adm. John Kirby said on Aug. 22.

“The Chinese jet also passed the nose of the P-8 at 90 degrees with its belly toward the P-8 Poseidon, we believe to make a point of showing its weapons load-out.”

Kirby went on to say that the Chinese conduct was, “unprofessional.”

Source: USNI “Chinese MOD Calls for a Stop of U.S. ‘Close-In’ Surveillance Flights”

Related post:

  • Dire US Ignorance of China’s Advanced Strategic Nuclear Submarines dated August 29, 2014
  • China Completes Deployment of Six 096 Nuclear Submarines with JL-3 SLBMs dated March 30, 2014

China Surpasses US in Hypersonic Weapons


The Advanced Hypersonic Weapon concept conducts its first flight in 2011 (Army photo)

The Advanced Hypersonic Weapon concept conducts its first flight in 2011 (Army photo)

National Defense magazine publishes an article by Valerie Insinna titled “US, China in Race to Develop Hypersonic Weapons”, stating that only two countries in the world China and the US have succeeded in testing their hypersonic weapons. The article fails to describe the application of such weapons, but focus on defense against such weapons.

There are detailed descriptions about China’s hypersonic glide vehicle (HGV) in my book. I have only to point out:

1. Chinese HGV has achieved a speed of Mach 10 while the US one, only Mach 5.

2. China will develop HGV with the speed of Mach 22 launched from its space-air bomber.

Mach 10 means 3.3 km per second. If launched from the height of 100 km low orbit of a satellite, it takes 30 seconds, an HGV reaches its target. Rich Fisher’s rail gun needs 2 minutes; therefore, there is no defense against a Mach 10 HGV.

If the HGV flies at a speed of Mach 22, it takes only 12 seconds!

That is why China adopts the Space Era Strategy to develop integrated space and air capabilities. The US, however, sticks to its outdated strategy of Air-Sea Battle. It focuses on defense instead of attack and is, therefore, doomed to defeat.

ICBM was first developed in early 1960s, but even now more than 50 years later, we still cannot 100% intercept it. Our interception system will be regarded as very good if the rate of interception is 50%.

The US has not yet been able to produce workable HGV, but focus on development of weapons to defend it. Why? Because it has to protect the major weapons of its Air-Sea Battle—its very expensive nuclear aircraft carriers.

In space era, aircraft carrier is obsolete.

The following is the full text of the magazine’s article:

US, China in Race to Develop Hypersonic Weapons
By Valerie Insinna

On the heels of reports that China had successfully completed a second ultra-high-speed missile flight test, the Defense Department announced on Aug. 25 that it had aborted a test of its own hypersonic weapon.

The military is investigating the “anomaly” responsible for the test failure, but analysts told National Defense that the incident was not a major setback for the program.

“It’s a glitch. These are weapons that operate under fantastic stresses,” said Rick Fisher, a senior fellow at the International Assessment and Strategy Center. “Failure is not necessarily a bad thing, especially if data can be gathered so that you learn from your mistake.”

“These weapons are traveling at such fantastic speeds and they are required to be capable of such accuracy that it is simply going to require an extensive development program to achieve a point where they can be considered ready for the field,” he added.

The Aug. 25 test of the advanced hypersonic weapon was aborted because of an unspecified flight anomaly, according to a Defense Department news release. “The test was terminated near the launch pad shortly after liftoff to ensure public safety. There were no injuries to any personnel,” the release read.

Testers made the decision to destroy the rocket within four seconds of its launch at the Kodiak Launch Complex in Alaska, said Maureen Schumann, a Pentagon spokeswoman. She was not able to provide additional information on what the anomaly was or how it was detected.

The advanced hypersonic weapon is just one of the technologies under development in the conventional prompt global strike program, she said. The goal is to create a menu of precision strike options that would be able to hit anywhere in the world in under an hour.

U.S. program officials are conducting an investigation to determine the cause of this Monday’s test failure, said Schumann. The investigation will likely take “weeks or months” to finish and will inform future tests and scheduling.

The August test was the second flight of the advanced hypersonic weapon, Schumann said. “The objective of the test was to develop and demonstrate hypersonic boost glide enabling technologies and collect data on flight vehicle and test range performance for long-range atmospheric flights.”

The United States may not be the only country that has been testing high-speed weapons this month. China conducted the second test flight of its hypersonic glide vehicle — called the Wu-14 — on Aug. 7, unnamed U.S. officials told the Washington Free Beacon.

Schumann would not confirm whether the Chinese military had executed a second Wu-14 test in August. Earlier this year, the Pentagon confirmed the Wu-14’s first flight test in January.

Based on the available evidence, including Chinese reports circulating the internet, it seems probable that there was a second Wu-14 test recently, Fisher said.

“China and the United States are seeking to develop the same range of hypersonic weapons, both boost-glide or hypersonic glide vehicles, and future air-breathing hypersonic vehicles, such as scram jets,” Fisher said.

The U.S. program appears to have progressed further, “but the Chinese program may be better funded and have greater depth in terms of the commitment of intellectual and development resources,” he said.

Mark Gunzinger, senior fellow at the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments, said he is skeptical that China’s development of hypersonic weapons has matured past that of the United States.

“We hear about the successes and not the failures” of the Chinese program, he said. “They could have had dozens of failures that we know nothing about, at least in public.”

Hypersonic weapons could be operational within a decade, Gunzinger said. The challenge, especially in a budget-conscious environment, will be figuring out how to drive down manufacturing costs.

“Can we find a sweet spot in hypersonic weapons where the price point is right and we can buy enough of them?” he asked.

One of the reasons why hypersonic weapons are so highly coveted is because they are difficult to shoot down, Fisher said. Directed energy weapons, such as a hypersonic capable rail gun or laser, could offer a way to counter hypersonic missiles.

“If you have two to four rail guns for example, [and] you get maybe a two-minute warning that a hypersonic warhead is coming at you, that’s enough time to put into the sky clouds of hypersonic rail gun rounds that are designed like shotgun shells,” he said. “They’ll release into the air 100 to 200 tungsten pellets. Even if the hypersonic warhead is maneuvering, you’re likely to knick it with one of these pellets, and that alone will make the warhead tumble out of control.”

The United States appears to be further along in its efforts to develop directed energy weapons, although China’s program is not particularly transparent, Fisher said.

The Navy in April unveiled a high-speed electromagnetic rail gun capable of launching projectiles at speeds up to 5,600 miles per hour. The service has also tested its laser weapons system at sea, proving that it could shoot down small unmanned aircraft.

That laser currently lacks the power and range necessary to destroy a hypersonic glide vehicle, but it could become powerful enough in the next decade to shoot down such weapons, Fisher said. A hypersonic speed capable rail gun is possible in the early 2020s, he added.

Gunzinger said it may be too difficult to intercept a hypersonic missile with a high-powered laser, but rail guns could be well suited for those missions.

The advanced hypersonic missile was developed by Sandia National Laboratory and the Army. Its first flight test took place in November 2011 and was successful, with the missile traveling from Hawaii and hitting a target at the Reagan Test Site on Kwajalein Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands.

Source: Chan Kai Yee “Space Era Strategy: The Way China Beats The US”

Source: National Defense magazine “US, China in Race to Develop Hypersonic Weapons”
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